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Chris Minter

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How to Run A Government: So that Citizens Benefit and Taxpayers Don't Go Crazy
How to Run A Government: So that Citizens Benefit and Taxpayers Don't Go Crazy
by Michael Barber
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.59

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thought-provoking and recommended guide to staying sane in public service, 5 May 2015
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This book by Sir Michael Barber manages to be at the same time a reminder of how good his book 'Instruction to Deliver' was; an antidote to the 'blunders of government' because it is positive about the fact that governments actually can deliver (even if its hard) - and it also functions as both a manual for mental survival for all public sector seniors and a helpful guide to private sector managers about why 'the government' seems so crazy at times. As I mellow as a manager I find I agree less with Sir Michael on the need for confrontation with the professional vested interests and the scepticism on 'consultation' but his message here is clear and readable and is essential reading for anyone who wants to make an impact in what is a notoriously difficult arena in which to thrive.


Eminence: Cardinal Richelieu and the Rise of France
Eminence: Cardinal Richelieu and the Rise of France
by Jean-Vincent Blanchard
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.34

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening biography of a complex statesman, 8 Jan. 2013
Like many readers I first discovered Cardinal Richelieu cast in rather murky perspective by Dumas and this book (one of very few modern english language books on Richelieu) brings him clearlyinto the light in his historical context and illustrates how he used the power of his 'Eminence' to create the conditions for the the France we know today. Reading this book you can begin to understand how his contribution lead to the later glories of the 'Sun King' and the later blood-thirsty revolution. Perhaps we do not see enough here of the cleric and the bishop in Richelieu's complex make-up but he certains comes across as an impressive, yet human, figure in this great new biography by Blanchard. I loved it.


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