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Ragui Rai: My Land and Its People
Ragui Rai: My Land and Its People
by Raghu Rai
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £101.99

5.0 out of 5 stars worth having!, 27 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is stunningly good. It is not the plushest of Rai's monographs - there are larger and more expensively produced volumes, with even better printing, but it is nevertheless a gem. There is work here that I had never seen before and the quality of the selected images is consistently high. If you like Ragu Rai's B&W work, get this!


Ladakh
Ladakh
by David Vaala
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £49.49

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 27 Jun 2013
This review is from: Ladakh (Hardcover)
Having already been to Ladakh several times I found this book a real disappointment. This was partly my own fault as I was hoping that someone who had managed to get his book of photographs from the area published would have spent enough time travelling in the region to give me some new insights into some off the beaten track places. No such luck! I was also hoping for a book of both landscapes and portraits of the local people in their environment. Unfortunately, only about a quarter of the book is landscapes and the rest of the book - pictures of people - are either very static and posed, or of masked temple dancers - again static and posed. Obviously, it did not meet my expectations - not the photographer's fault.

However, the quality of both the photographs and print quality is mediocre at best and the design layout is chaotic and distracting. By far the best photo and printing is on the cover; it's rapidly down hill from there. The landscapes are often drab and the lighting is uninteresting - he was there, so he took the photo! Some pictures - both landscapes and portraits - are not even very sharp. The portrait work is particularly uninteresting: direct poses, repetitively either next to windows or in bright sunlight, and lacking any atmosphere from the surroundings. There are many, many photographers, many of them amateurs, who produce far more polished work. You are likely to see much better and more varied photography in travel guides. This photographer seems to have made no effort to explore the region and has simply photographed all the typical tourist destinations in a clichéd way - albeit without the tourists. I sent the book straight back.


Wild Goose and Riddon: The Dartmoor Photographs of Chris Chapman
Wild Goose and Riddon: The Dartmoor Photographs of Chris Chapman
by Chris Chapman
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning!, 20 July 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
One of the very best monographs on on any area of England. This obscurely titled book is a record of the work of a Lancashire lad who moved south to Dartmoor in the 70's and began diligently to record what he saw there. Predominantly 35mm, but with some medium format, these are exquisitely printed, rich-toned images of a way of life that is disappearing or has already gone. Chris Chapman was a friend of the late James Ravilious; both were working over similarly long periods at more or less the same time in areas that were next door to each other. They often talked about their projects and shared ideas, and each took a keen interest in the creative possibilities of the B&W medium. Unfortunately, almost scandalously, Ravilious has never had his photographs reproduced in such a representative format that does justice to the excellence of his work. That is not the case with the present volume, which really shows Chapman's work off in the way that it deserves. What we have here is an unsentimental but sensitive view of local characters in, and deeply marked by, their land, their traditions and their livelihoods, captured with incisive photography. If you can get hold of a copy, don't hesitate!


Sinan (Makers of Islamic Civilization)
Sinan (Makers of Islamic Civilization)
by J. M. Rogers
Edition: Paperback

5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why not do some research?, 14 Feb 2010
From the first pages of the book - "Sinan was, of course, a Muslim building for Muslim patrons." Well, with sublime disregard for Sinan's origins Rogers wades into his revisionist history. Unfortunately, he is wrong, but prefers not to investigate the matter - from Wikipaedia "Sinan was born with the name Joseph as an Armenian or Rūm Christian in 1489, in a small town called Agirnas (present-day Mimarsinanköy) near the city of Kayseri." Actually Rūm is just the Turkish nationalist word for Greek. Turks don't like to think that there are other nationalities - Kurds, Armenians, Greeks living within their boundaries, so historically they have tried to deny their existence, or worse, eliminate them. The normal Turkish policy was to force non-Muslims - Armenians and Greeks to convert and to encourage them to change their names so that they sounded more Turkish, and if they were talented, like Sinan obviously was, claim them for their own.

All Armenian surnames end - ian, so Golbenkian, Sarafian etc. Sinan is close. Anyone who has been to Kayseri and the surrounding villages knows that this was for centuries an Armenian city - at least until all the Armenians were driven out and murdered - there is still plenty of Armenian architecture there. Unfortunately, none of this fits with Rogers' desire to eulogise Muslim architecture. Nor does the fact that almost all Ottoman architecture within modern day Turkey was designed by Christian architects - either Greek or Armenian. The Turks had swept down from the steppes of central Asia, where they had no architects.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 10, 2012 2:30 PM GMT


Bert Teunissen: Domestic Landscapes: A Portrait of Europeans at Home
Bert Teunissen: Domestic Landscapes: A Portrait of Europeans at Home
by Bert Teunissen
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and fascinating, 26 Jun 2008
First off the book is captioned wrongly, the photographer is Bert Teunissen and the book is a MONOGRAPH of his superb photographs.

These are superbly executed 4x5 photographs from a really interesting project. Teunissen spent a number of years travelling to various parts of Europe to photograph the beautifully, naturally lit interiors of unrennovated houses along with their elderly inhabitants centre stage. The result is a glimpse into the recent past, which will soon be gone forever. The images are by turns moving and intriguing. That many people obviously live in these sometimes beautifully simple and spartan houses, without modern conveniences, in order to remain connected with a reminder of their past raises the viewer's curiosity in a way that simple interiors would not. Well worth the space on any photographers bookcase. 5 star plus.


Adobe Photoshop CS3 for Photographers: A Professional Image Editor's Guide to the Creative use of Photoshop for the Macintosh and PC
Adobe Photoshop CS3 for Photographers: A Professional Image Editor's Guide to the Creative use of Photoshop for the Macintosh and PC
by Martin Evening
Edition: Paperback

2 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 26 Jun 2008
Badly written, awful explanations - a truly disorganised thinker, unable to explain relatively simple things simply or clearly.


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