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{ Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith Paperback } Reeves, Michael ( Author ) Jul-18-2012 Paperback
{ Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith Paperback } Reeves, Michael ( Author ) Jul-18-2012 Paperback
by Michael Reeves
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Delighting in the Trinity, 8 Dec. 2013
My full review found here: [...]

Reeves's basis is: What is the point of the Trinity? Why does it matter if we have one or not? How does what I know about the Trinity affect my daily living?

When we look at Michelangelo's painting "The Creation of Adam" in the Sistine Chapel, we see Adam limply holding his hand out, being supported by his knee. But to whom? As we continue to scan the painting, we see that he is barely holding his hand out to God who is reaching out, almost straining, to make contact with Adam.

All of humankind has this kind of meager attitude (less actually) toward God. But the Father, overflowing in love, created us and sent His Son to die and share in what He has so that we could be co-inheritors with Christ and be reunited with God who then gives us even more: His Spirit, who "not only enables us to know and love Christ; he also gives us the mind of Christ, making us like him" (pg. 95). And the best we can do is lift up a finger, as if even pointing to God is going too far.

This book is about the love of the Trinity for mankind and how it is so unexpected, undeserved, unmerited, and how God continues to show His mercy on us even still.

-------
This book is 130 pages, but really it's only 121. It's such a short read!

Reeves says that the Trinity isn't an oddity (for it is who God is, and God isn't odd), but many of the images people use to describe God (eggs, water, a shamrock, even bacon) make the Trinity seem anything but `normal.'

It's a simple read: I read this book before I arrived in York for my last Bible College semester Spring '13. I read the first 2 chapters at home, and then the other 5 on the plane ride over to the UK. It was so interesting I couldn't put it down, but it was so simple I didn't want to put it down!

It's a deep read: But simple doesn't equal childish. This book can be understood by high schoolers to scholars to pastors to teachers to moms and dads. It's not a book on being able to spit out facts on the omniscience of the Holy Spirit and how the hypostatic union of Christ works. It's not about brainy knowledge. It's about a true relationship, and the more we see how much God loves us (though we'll never scratch the surface), the more we want to be enveloped in that love and spend time with Him and live in a way that pleases Him.

This does not replace the Bible (of course), but it is a helpful and practical supplement.


[ DELIGHTING IN THE TRINITY: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CHRISTIAN FAITH ] BY Reeves, Michael ( Author ) [ 2012 ] Paperback
[ DELIGHTING IN THE TRINITY: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CHRISTIAN FAITH ] BY Reeves, Michael ( Author ) [ 2012 ] Paperback
by Michael Reeves
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Delighting in the Trinity, 8 Dec. 2013
My full review found here: [...]

Reeves's basis is: What is the point of the Trinity? Why does it matter if we have one or not? How does what I know about the Trinity affect my daily living?

When we look at Michelangelo's painting "The Creation of Adam" in the Sistine Chapel, we see Adam limply holding his hand out, being supported by his knee. But to whom? As we continue to scan the painting, we see that he is barely holding his hand out to God who is reaching out, almost straining, to make contact with Adam.

All of humankind has this kind of meager attitude (less actually) toward God. But the Father, overflowing in love, created us and sent His Son to die and share in what He has so that we could be co-inheritors with Christ and be reunited with God who then gives us even more: His Spirit, who "not only enables us to know and love Christ; he also gives us the mind of Christ, making us like him" (pg. 95). And the best we can do is lift up a finger, as if even pointing to God is going too far.

This book is about the love of the Trinity for mankind and how it is so unexpected, undeserved, unmerited, and how God continues to show His mercy on us even still.

-------
This book is 130 pages, but really it's only 121. It's such a short read!

Reeves says that the Trinity isn't an oddity (for it is who God is, and God isn't odd), but many of the images people use to describe God (eggs, water, a shamrock, even bacon) make the Trinity seem anything but `normal.'

It's a simple read: I read this book before I arrived in York for my last Bible College semester Spring '13. I read the first 2 chapters at home, and then the other 5 on the plane ride over to the UK. It was so interesting I couldn't put it down, but it was so simple I didn't want to put it down!

It's a deep read: But simple doesn't equal childish. This book can be understood by high schoolers to scholars to pastors to teachers to moms and dads. It's not a book on being able to spit out facts on the omniscience of the Holy Spirit and how the hypostatic union of Christ works. It's not about brainy knowledge. It's about a true relationship, and the more we see how much God loves us (though we'll never scratch the surface), the more we want to be enveloped in that love and spend time with Him and live in a way that pleases Him.

This does not replace the Bible (of course), but it is a helpful and practical supplement.


Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith
Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith
by Michael Reeves
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delighting in the Trinity Review, 8 Dec. 2013
My full review found here: [...]

Reeves's basis is: What is the point of the Trinity? Why does it matter if we have one or not? How does what I know about the Trinity affect my daily living?

When we look at Michelangelo's painting "The Creation of Adam" in the Sistine Chapel, we see Adam limply holding his hand out, being supported by his knee. But to whom? As we continue to scan the painting, we see that he is barely holding his hand out to God who is reaching out, almost straining, to make contact with Adam.

All of humankind has this kind of meager attitude (less actually) toward God. But the Father, overflowing in love, created us and sent His Son to die and share in what He has so that we could be co-inheritors with Christ and be reunited with God who then gives us even more: His Spirit, who "not only enables us to know and love Christ; he also gives us the mind of Christ, making us like him" (pg. 95). And the best we can do is lift up a finger, as if even pointing to God is going too far.

This book is about the love of the Trinity for mankind and how it is so unexpected, undeserved, unmerited, and how God continues to show His mercy on us even still.

-------
This book is 130 pages, but really it's only 121. It's such a short read!

Reeves says that the Trinity isn't an oddity (for it is who God is, and God isn't odd), but many of the images people use to describe God (eggs, water, a shamrock, even bacon) make the Trinity seem anything but `normal.'

It's a simple read: I read this book before I arrived in York for my last Bible College semester Spring '13. I read the first 2 chapters at home, and then the other 5 on the plane ride over to the UK. It was so interesting I couldn't put it down, but it was so simple I didn't want to put it down!

It's a deep read: But simple doesn't equal childish. This book can be understood by high schoolers to scholars to pastors to teachers to moms and dads. It's not a book on being able to spit out facts on the omniscience of the Holy Spirit and how the hypostatic union of Christ works. It's not about brainy knowledge. It's about a true relationship, and the more we see how much God loves us (though we'll never scratch the surface), the more we want to be enveloped in that love and spend time with Him and live in a way that pleases Him.

This does not replace the Bible (of course), but it is a helpful and practical supplement.


Against the Gods
Against the Gods
by John D. Currid
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Against the Gods of the Ancient Near East, 8 Dec. 2013
This review is from: Against the Gods (Paperback)
Read my full review at [...]
or
[...]

This book is about the relationship between the writings of the Old Testament and other ANE (ancient Near Eastern) literature. If you've never heard of this field of study, you may be surprised to hear that it (as with anything that has to do with the Bible) is a heavily debated topic: how does the Bible relate with ANE literature? Some believe ANE studies are actually a danger to Scripture. Others say the Old Testament is not unique, but merely another book of ANE myths simply retold to another audience.


The context of much of the Old Testament is set in the ANE culture, yet the Old Testament (and the Bible as a whole) is grounded in monotheism. So what is the Old Testament's relationship to ANE literature?

Currid's objective is to show that the idea of polemics in literature is not foreign to the Old Testament, it was very common in ANE culture, and the Old Testament writers used it well. It's purpose is to emphatically demonstrate the distinctions between the worldviews of the Hebrews and the rest of the ANE.


The Chocolate Milk
+ Currid looks at the parallels in the ANE/Bible stories before giving the contrasts. It actually builds suspense because, even though I know he's going to prove his point, it leads me to try to figure out how he'll dig himself out of the hole he's in. [Spoiler: he does].

+ Currid sets out to prove the authenticity of the Bible's polemics. Just because there are parallels between an ANE myth and the Bible doesn't mean that both are myths. There's no reason one cannot be myth and the other true history. Just because TV has "Desperate Housewives" doesn't mean that newspaper stories of adultery are fake. So even the stories of a "spurned seductress" in ANE myths doesn't mean there can't be a true account in Genesis [38, with Joseph and Potiphar's wife].

+ The real highlight of the book was the Polemical Angle at the end of almost every chapter.
For example: At the end of chapter 3 Currid shows what it meant for Genesis 1-2 as a creation story to be a polemic against other ANE myths.


The Spoiled Milk
- This book is short. Not bad, but I felt like Currid spent more time talking about ANE parallels than polemics. And that was the main reason why I bought the book: the polemics.

- I'd rather know the biblical details than the ANE geographical details of where ANE literature was found, how much of it was found, the different kinds of lists found, etc (ex: Atrahasis at Ugarit, p. 53; Hittite Tales, p. 83; information about what the "Walls of the Ruler" is p.91). This is fine, but considering the size of the book, the polemical paragraphs were too short and too few.

- In almost every chapter (meaning over and over) Currid would state the same 3 differences between the ANE account and the biblical account:
1. Myth vs historical fact.
2. Theology (poly vs mono) (one God to rule them all).
3. The importance of humans in the Bible narrative vs ANE myths.
+
At least, these were usually worded differently in each chapter, and there was still the P/A section in the end.

- One big downside for me was in Chapter 10 (The Parting of the Waters of the Red Sea). Instead of spelling out the arguments on how God hardened Pharaoh's heart, Currid doesn't want to repeat himself and instead points us to the "relevant literature" (an article he wrote in Bible Review [1993]).


- 
I understand there may be page number restrictions, but I don't want to have to search out a magazine from 20 years ago when I could read it in the book, especially when I can't seem to find the copy on the internet (for free, at least).


- Considering Pharaoh's hardened heart is a well-known, difficult Bible passage, and seeing how it relates to Egypt literature is very important to understand the meaning, I don't think anyone would mind if Currid repeated himself here. (And swapped it with a few ANE readings...)

This book was promising, but left me disappointed.

Recommended?
No. Not to most people.
If you're a teacher who wants to know more about ANE parallels with the Bible, or a student who has a Bible-bashing college history teacher, then sure, this book would be of help.
But most people just won't want to read this book, especially when there's more ANE information than polemical detail available.


P.S. Thanks to Netgalley.com and Crossway for allowing me a free copy to read and review! The words expressed above are my own opinion of the book. Any page numbers are from the Adobe Digital Editions version.


Resisting Gossip: Winning the War of the Wagging Tongue
Resisting Gossip: Winning the War of the Wagging Tongue
Price: £7.27

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Could You Really Resist Gossip?, 8 Dec. 2013
Read my full review here: [...]

"Without wood a fire goes out;
Without gossip a quarrel dies down" (Prov. 26:20).

"Only you can prevent forest fires" (Smokey the Bear).

In Resisting Gossip author Matthew Mitchell says that he wished to find a one-size-fits-all solution to gossip. But gossip is messier than that. However, God's wisdom is greater than the challenge. Gossip is a broad, tricky, and a pernicious problem that needs to be dealt with quickly when it crops up. Christian Living books should not provide a single fix-all for every problem. There is no one way to handle gossip. But most importantly in this book Mitchell goes for the heart of the problem. And the heart of the problem is the problem of the heart.

Mitchell gives practical, positive, spiritual advice on not only avoiding gossiping, but what to do if you become a victim of gossip. Mitchell carefully defines gossip and it's many prevalent forms (no one is exempt here, not even you).

The Chocolate Milk
+ The author presents his material in a clear and accessible way. He is honest about his own failures and successes, and humbly opens himself to the reader.. And this vulnerability helps the readers do the same, especially as Matt consistently applies the Gospel to all of us throughout the book.

+ Mitchell uses Scripture to back up his points and avoids easy/moralistic/legalistic solutions.

+ He uses a lot of references from Proverbs. It's one thing to read through Proverbs and read all the verses on gossip. It's another to see them all throughout this book as the main book to be referenced. Let me tell you, there are verses a'plenty on gossip in Proverbs (which is good, and convicting).

+ There are 5-6 Discussion questions at the end of each chapter for either group discussion or personal reflection. While I didn't go through every question and answer them myself, they seem to be good at making you think on how gossip is wrong, what you would do if you were on either side of the equation, how the gospel and the love of Christ are better than gossip, etc. They make you think, and that forces you to think about your actions and their consequences the next time you want to open your mouth and speak.

+ The book supports not just the negative prohibition of the tongue, but the positive use of it too. It would have been easy to stay just on the negative, but the true solutions are all related to the development of the positive use of the tongue (and the heart). It's like Jesus' command to "do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Other leaders (religious or otherwise) in the world have given the same pronouncement in the negative "Do not do to others what would anger you if done to you by others" (Isocrates). Knowing the negative is great, but having to follow the positive takes great effort.

+ The book is well-organized making it easy to follow along and read. It's encouraging to know where the book is heading, and to be able to follow along, especially with an important subject like this.

The Spoiled Milk
This book was good for the topic it's on. Really good. It was revealing, convicting, and all around encouraging to have some wisdom on this topic, to see more of the ins and outs of gossip, and to know what not to do and how to help instead. To speak good of others over bad (even if it's true!) because you love them (even if you don't feel like you do). So for this book, there isn't much wrong to say (except for one thought:

- Maybe he could have used more real world examples, maybe they were just enough. I thought the amount was good, but more would always be nice too.

+ Yet, it seemed the examples he did use were relevant. They weren't thought of just so he could put them in a book, but they really fit the situation.

Recommended?
Heck, yes. I didn't find myself very prone to gossip, but this book goes deeper than average gossip. Mitchell pinpoints everyone. You will look at gossip differently than you did before this book.


Finding the Will of God?: A Pagan Notion?
Finding the Will of God?: A Pagan Notion?
by Bruce K. Waltke
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does One Have to 'Find' God's Will?, 8 Dec. 2013
Full Review Here: [...]

The Gist
Waltke asks if we can we ever know God's will? He examines many practices that some Christians pass off as divine guidance: following hunches, casting lots, looking for signs, dreams, audible words from the Lord, etc. He doesn't completely discount these things. God could certainly speak to us in a dream, audibly, or by the flip of a coin if He wanted to, but this is not always the case. In fact, it is not usually the case. Waltke points out that the `wisdom' in James 1:5 isn't speaking about a `special revelation' on a certain decision, but wisdom is a way of life: purity, peacefulness, and gentleness (James 3:13-17).

Waltke spends chapters 2-3 talking about the ways pagans sought, through divinations, the will of the gods, and how God's will was (rightfully) sought in the OT. In chapter 4 he says that we don't need to do those things anymore. I won't talk about them much so as to not give too much more away, but he elaborates on God's program of guidance: Reading your Bible, prayer, developing a heart of God, seeking wise counsel, looking for God's providence (sometimes circumstances do/don't go in a certain way), if the situation makes sense, and divine intervention.

Recommended?
Totally. Waltke talks about the wrong ways to look for God's will and the correct, "common sense" ways to do it. The point isn't just to come to God when you're in a tough spot, get the answer, and then go on with life. It's to have an ongoing relationship with God. Life will always be filled with tough decisions, gray areas, and seemingly impossible paths. What do you do? Well, following Waltke's advice won't clear all of life's difficulties, but as you are conformed to Christ the more likely you are to know and make the right choices.

My only wish is that Waltke says after Pentecost in Acts 2, no one ever sought the Lord's will. I would have liked for Waltke to have elaborated more on different times in Acts when Paul (and Barnabas) sought the Lord. But the reason is probably that Paul probably didn't have to because he and Barnabas didn't try to "divine" the will of the Lord. They simply walked with the Lord, fasted, prayed, and used some common sense here and there.

Only by walking with Him will we have the heart of God and know what pleases Him.


From Heaven He Came and Sought Her
From Heaven He Came and Sought Her
by David Gibson & Jonathan Gibson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £32.03

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Resource on Definite Atonement, 8 Dec. 2013
My entire review is on my blog found at this link:
[...]

What this book has been set forth to do is provide an updated resource for the legitimacy of definite (limited) atonement. In case you're unsure of what that means, it views the atonement through the lens of election, "teaching that Christ died only for the elect, to secure infallibly the salvation of the elect" (p37).

The book is divided into 4 main sections:
I. Definite Atonement in Church History which goes over definite atonement's controversies and nuances in church history
II. Definite Atonement in the Bible shows to prove definite atonement's presence or absence in the Bible
III. Definite Atonement in Theological Perspective: What are definite atonement's theological implications?
IV. Definite Atonement in Pastoral Practice What is a pastor to do with the consequences of definite atonement?

Clearly, I cannot give this book an "adequate" review (consider it's size. It's massive! It's 704 pages (front-to-back) with 23 different essays from different authors. I actually did not read any essay in the Church History section. However, I read all but one of the other essays in this book. I will comment mainly on the section titled "Definite Atonement in the Bible", and loosely on the remaining two sections.

***Definite Atonement in the Bible***

This was easily my favorite part of the book. There were 6 essays, dealing with how D.A. is seen in the Pentateuch (Genesis-Deuteronomy), in Isaiah's suffering Servant, in the Synoptic Gospels and Johannine literature, in the Pauline epistles, in Paul's theology of salvation, and in the Pastoral and General epistles.

D.A. in the Pentateuch was intriguing. I had come to the understanding that D.A. could easily be refuted because even though Israel underwent the Day of Atonement, not all of Israel was saved. However, I realized it was more tricky than that because Israel was called "out of the world" by God. Ah, there's that election status. Alright Williamson (author), you got me there.

In the Suffering Servant, J. Alec Motyer [Tyndale] does a fantastic job explaining how D.A. is seen in Isaiah 53 [and the surrounding chapters]. I say "fantastic" not because I necessarily agree with him, but because he is so clear (which, unfortunately, not every author is. Just wait until I get to the Theological section). Motyer goes through the dimensions of salvation seen in the Suffering Servant passage, along with the "many" intended recipients of salvation and what "many" means in context.

Harmon does a good job showing D.A. in the Synoptics, but his real focus is seen in the Johannine literature where he points to and elaborates on many of Jesus' discourses (Bread of Life [Jn 6:22-58], High Priestly Prayer [Jn. 17:1-26], and the Throne Room Vision [Rev. 4:1-5:14]). He shows how Christ died for His people, how Jesus died for the "world", and what those "universal" texts (may) mean. He does a good job (though I was hoping for more) of explaining 1 John 2:2 and shows a parallel between it and John 11:52 giving more backdrop to the situation.

Gibson's first chapter on the meanings of Christ dying for "me," for "us," for "the church," for "His people," for "all," for the "world," was particularly interesting, including the section on the "Perishing" texts [Rom. 14:15; 1 Cor. 8:11; and Acts 20:28-30] which was particularly illuminating.
However his next essay was a bit more obtrusive. Maybe that's harsh, because it was good. However, I felt like there were so many side-roads or new discussions popping up that I felt lost at times. "Karl Barth? Who invited you?" His thoughts on the Trinity and D.A. were helpful, though the format still led to some confusion.

Finally, Thomas Schreiner. He covers topics such as how God desires to save all [1 Tim. 2:1-7]; God is the Savior of all, especially of those who believe [1 Tim. 4:10]; the false teachers who fell away from Christ who "bought them" [2 Pet. 2:1], and more. After reading Gibson, Schreiner was a breath of fresh air. He is a very clear and coherent writer. Though, I will say that there are times when he gives ideas that sound right, and in the next paragraph scraps the whole idea. But aside from that, I appreciated his input into this topic (D.A. in the Pastoral/General epistles).

What I liked about this section is that the authors go to the source itself (the Bible), and show you what they believe it says. You can take it or leave it from there. You can look for yourself in your own Bible and see if you agree or not, why or why not, and what you think about their conclusions. But a least you can see who they arrived there.

***Definite Atonement in Theological Perspective***

Quite frankly, this section was hit or miss for me. I didn't read Macleod's essay (the first), but I read all of the others. I found every one of them (except for Wellum's "The New Covenant Work of Christ") to be difficult to read. While I think it is an accurate statement that I don't know enough about this subject as a whole (which is why I requested this book), I found many of the authors in this section weren't always clear in the subjects they were talking about. If they interacted with other scholars and discussions, I frequently found myself entangled in a mess of who's who on what's what? I wasn't always sure which side of the debate the author was vying for.

Wellum's essay on Christ's New Covenant work was a a sigh of relief! Finally, an essay I understood and could take something away from. I felt like I didn't have to work to understand this chapter. Wellum shows the connections between Christ's atonement for His people and His High Priestly ministry for His people (Priesthood, typology, the old and new covenants) and how Christ fulfills the office of the OT High Priest. I found this to be a very good mixture between the Theological Perspective and the Biblical Exegesis.

***Definite Atonement in Pastoral Practice***

Strange's chapter was fairly good, yet in the end I felt like I was left on a cliffhanger. I'm not really sure if all the ends were tied at the conclusion or not on unlimited atonement, the universal call to evangelize, and those who will never hear.

Ferguson's essay dealt with Jesus's teaching on D.A. in John 10, which was an interesting read. However, I felt he spent more time talking about the other sides deficiencies rather than the assurance that DA provides. Campbell? Federal theologians? Older Calvinism? How does help me to assure my flock if I'm a pastor? His conclusion made sense, but it felt like I took the long road there and was then left wanting.

John Piper. Of course Piper's essay will be good. He broke his essay down into mini-sections, and when I was reading Piper's view, I knew it was his view of D.A. When he spoke on Driscoll's view or Ware's view, I knew he was talking about Driscoll or Ware. There was no confusion. I never stopped to think, "Wait, who/what is he talking about? How did I get here?" And for that I am thankful.

Two points I was glad to see Piper touch one were as such:
1). Piper goes to explain how one, believing in D.A., could preach a sincere and valid Gospel to the entire, unevangelized world.
2). Piper explains how one who was atoned for my Christ's blood could be under the wrath of God before being saved. If they are really atoned for, how are they still under the wrath of God at all (even before salvation)? Piper gives a pretty good explanation. Not perfect or amazing, but it makes sense to a degree.

***Summary***

All in all, this is a huge book. You will see a lot of names. You will see a lot of Greek in the Bible exegesis section #2 (though not an overwhelming amount). This is a book geared more toward Bible college, seminary, scholars, and not the layman (unless you really know your stuff). Though I wish some scholars could have been more clear or concise in their writing, I understand this is a tough subject to write on, and I am but one reader trying to understand the aspects of this doctrine so that I can better speak with and understand those around me. I won't understand everything. This book is an incredible resource that will hold for years to come on the doctrine of Definite Atonement. Now, I'm waiting for the other side (Unlimited Atonement) to come out with a book so I can see their position. We'll see.

[A big "thank you" to NetGalley and Crossway for allowing me to read and review this book before it came out. I was not obligated to give a positive review in return for reviewing my copy].


Is God anti-gay? (Questions Christians Ask)
Is God anti-gay? (Questions Christians Ask)
Price: £2.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Is God, in fact, anti-gay?, 8 Dec. 2013
See my full review here: [...]

Homosexuality is a hot topic in the church and in some of our countries today today. What does the Bible say on homosexuality? And do the Christians in the church accurately reflect what it teaches? We need to remember that we are dealing with real people who have real struggles and issues just like the rest of us.

The author, Sam Allberry, is the associate pastor of St. Mary's Church in Maidenhead, UK. He writes this book because it is well needed in a time like this. He clearly explains what the Bible says about marriage, sexuality, same-sex attraction (SSA), and how Christians should respond. Allberry writes this book from his own experience as one who had and still has same-sex attractions.

Summary

Allberry starts with the center. He keeps the main thing the main thing. What is the Gospel, and what does it say I should do? The Gospel declares that Jesus has come to save us from bondage, and that we are to 'turn' in repentance toward Him, which means we were not heading in the right direction in the first place.

Allberry then moves to chapter one with a Bible view of marriage and sex.

Chapter two continues with the Bible's view of homosexuality [Gen. 19; Lev. 18 and 20; Rom. 1:18-32; 1 Cor. 6:9-10; 1 Tim. 1:8-10] all the while explaining what each text means in context and some different issues within them.

Chapter three is on homosexuality and the Christian and what happens when a Christian is struggling with same-sex issues, or when a homosexual becomes a Christian but is still struggling?

Chapter four is on homosexuality and the church and what you should focus on if a homosexual couple starts coming to your church? Their spiritual needs come first: they need Jesus.

Chapter 5 is on homosexuality and the world. How do you respond when your friend comes out and tells you they're gay? How do you then share Christ with them? How could you be the most loving and effective witness to the world on this issue?

Allberry ends with a conclusion stating that "Jesus is the bread of life. He - and he alone - is the one who satisfies" (p. 82).

The Chocolate Milk (what I liked)

+Almost every chapter ends with a gray box with a significant question that many have asked before: "Surely a same-sex partnership is OK if it's committed and faithful?", "Aren't we just picking and choosing which Old Testament laws apply?", "Can't Christians just agree to differ on this?", along with others. Each section is answered in a few paragraphs, but the depth of the answer given is perfectly adequate for the posed question. They are not easy question, but the answers are spot on and complete.

+This is a simple book to read. It's only 83 pages, and it's very Christ-focused. There are some hard truths, but they are not written out of hatred. Allberry understands what life is like living with SSA, denying himself, and saying "Yes" to Jesus. These are hard truths to accept, but these are also hard truths that he himself is accepting and living life accordingly.

Recommended?

Yes.

Allberry covers a lot of ground in such a small book, and in doing so he shows God's heart toward homosexuals, gays, lesbians, those who have same-sex attraction, and it's the same heart he has toward all who sin. God loves us, and He is not "anti-gay." Allberry writes for the benefit of those who experience SSA that God does love them, and for the benefit of those who don't share in experiencing SSA to know how to love and minister to those who do.

Homosexual lifestyles are becoming more common place, and Christians need to know how to say more than, "That's sin." But then what? How is that person supposed to live in light of that? We need to be more helpful in lovingly showing others how to live in light of the Gospel of Jesus. It is good news. Right?

[A big "thank you" to Dean Faulkner at Good Books UK for sending me a free copy to review. I was not obligated to give a positive review in return for reviewing my copy.]


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