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The Tyranny of Health: Doctors and the Regulation of Lifestyle
The Tyranny of Health: Doctors and the Regulation of Lifestyle
by Michael Fitzpatrick
Edition: Paperback
Price: 26.76

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars medical nemesis, 19 Mar 2007
see also Ivan Illich and Skrabenek on these themes. A doctor in the East End charts the development medicine over the past 10 years from one based on professional autonomy of the doctor to the doctor becoming an arm of state policy and coercsion.


The Hallelujah Revolution: The Rise of the New Christians
The Hallelujah Revolution: The Rise of the New Christians
by Ian Cotton
Edition: Hardcover

3.0 out of 5 stars 3 stars for amusement value rather than facts offered, 19 Mar 2007
Religious revival is explored in its historical context and explanations sought in the configuration of the brain, we now live in a right hemisphere dominated world that is touchy feely etc, this same brain predominance is also responsible for certain people feeling depressed, bottoming out and reaching a cartharsis in some type of religious experience. Its all so simple really.


The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudice Among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939
The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudice Among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939
by John Carey
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.69

10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The 'Intellectual Elites' view YOU the masses with fear & suspicion., 27 Feb 2002
Carey is an excellent author (and speaker) he never gets over heated, pompous or partisan.
This book outlines how the intellectual elite of the 1930s viewed thier fellow man, mainly with contempt from what I can make out. Bernard Shaw, D H Lawrence the Bloomsbury set, Graham Green were all vexed by the growing population of those not of their class; they became enamoured of Nietzsche,and his view of the masses as also contemptuous and too numerous. The Masses are considered to be like a plague particularly with regard to urbanization (caused by the population explosion and the resulting loss of the green fields of England gobbled up by Suburbia. In fact to be labeled 'Suburban' or a 'Clerk' by the 'intelligensia' is the highest insult).
The upsurge in culture for the newly literate 'mass man' was also despised:-the penny dreadful and Daily Mail. Many of the 'intellectuals' in their writings loath the masses so much they favour extermination (Shaw and Lawrence for example)but don't go into details as to how this should be accomplished. To them the Masses were somehow not quite as human as they the intellectuals were and so made good candidates for a cul. The book forms a good backdrop to studying trends in the 1930s and the intellectual life that resulted from it. If anyone doubts that their literary heroes could think such things the Eugenics movement and its supporters is well documented in other sources.
Along similar lines to this book is 'Our Culture what's left of it' by Theodore Dalrymple which has chapters on D.H. Lawrence and Woolf which are excellent and argue in a similar direction to Carey. If one goes on to YouTube you can find footage of G.B. Shaw talking about 'humane killing' with gas ovens.


Haven in a Heartless World: The Family Besieged (Norton Paperback)
Haven in a Heartless World: The Family Besieged (Norton Paperback)
by Christopher Lasch
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The State Versus the Family, 27 Feb 2002
For anyone who has read Ivan Illich, there is plenty in this book to study his themes further.
The introduction is a good overview of Lasch's arguments, the main body of the work deals with analysis of various sociologist's commentaries, who have studied the family - and as most sociologists deal in double Dutch, to my way of thinking, this can be a bit heavy going in places.
One of the ideas of the book is that industrialization has been a force over the past 200 years for the disintegration of the family. By steadily taking functions away from the family it has left it little ground to occupy. (here for themes on the loss community and see Ivan Illich's "Tools for Conviviality") Functions once performed by the family such as production, care of the sick, education, health and childbirth have all become the province of the state. More sinister still the state seeks to take from the family its mediating role as transmitter of culture and values (for themes along these lines see "The twilight of American Culture" By Morris Berman and Orwell's 1984) The state wishes to deal directly with the masses and not have its message filtered or warped through the mesh of the family. P18 "Having monopolized the knowledge necessary to socialize the young, the agencies of socialized reproduction then parceled it out piecemeal in the form of parent education - old functions (of the family) of child welfare and training have passed over into the hands of sociologists, Psychiatrists, Physicians, home economists and other scientists dealing with problems of human welfare. Having first declared parents incompetent to raise their offspring without professional help, social pathologists "gave back" the knowledge they had appropriated ...in a mystifying fashion that rendered parents more helpless than ever...more dependent on expert opinion" To breakdown discredit or reduce the influence of the family is the goal of social engineers. P102 "The mental health movement and more broadly the "helping professions" positioned themselves in the vanguard of the revolt against old-fashioned middle class morality. Their (Professionals) ideology anticipated the needs of a society based not on hard work but on consumption and the search for personal fulfillment".
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 30, 2009 5:46 PM GMT


The Quest for Cosmic Justice
The Quest for Cosmic Justice
by Thomas Sowell
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Liberal's plan for world domination, 25 Feb 2002
Thomas Sowell is such a clear and concise writer. His books tend to be short and pithy, no waffle is to be found, argument and evidence present only - in abundance. His writing is also devoid of the sort of sanctimonious "asides" one is apt to come across in some other authors.
Cosmic Justice is that state of affairs aimed at by our social engineers. Equality world wide to name but one vision. To this end various tinkerings with education and the law seek to raise some men up (positive discrimination) and level others down. The net result is the erosion of real freedoms, enshrined in the constitution for all and a worsening state for those the social visionaries claim they want to help.
Through the apparatus of the state the social visionaries want to stamp their view of what the world ought to be - and they are not hampered by the facts, an understanding of economics or human nature, they will force their view on everyone no matter what.


The Corrosion of Character: Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism
The Corrosion of Character: Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism
by Richard Sennett
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.09

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The new world of work, 23 Feb 2002
This book rang a bell with me because I can see the trends it describes unravelling in my own place of work.
Team working and flat structures are both attacked as one method by which bosses retain power over workers but shed responsibility. Every one is on their own in the world of new working methods and only the bosses really benefit. The old heirarchies are not eulogised but by comparison for Sennett are a lot better than the present state of affairs.The fallout affects the families and other relationships of the workers -there is no trust left and no long term goal to work towards.


Conveyancing Fraud
Conveyancing Fraud
by Michael Joseph
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book which is about much more than conveyancing, 14 Jan 2000
This review is from: Conveyancing Fraud (Paperback)
Although published in 1995 I was still able to use this book to do my own conveyancing saving myself 1500.
This book will show you how to do your own conveyancing and more importantly the logic/illogic behind all the rules, he has also written a book called "Lawyers are bad for your health" which is all about what the title suggests and looks into other professions as well. The author is sadly now dead (d1995)I believe it to be quite unique in its shocking look behind the scenes.I've looked for other books on the subject but their approach is still very much to 'kowtow' to the professions.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 29, 2011 2:08 PM BST


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