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Athletic Ability And The Anatomy Of Motion
Athletic Ability And The Anatomy Of Motion
by Rolf Wirhed Fil Lic
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The body is a marvelous thing, 31 July 2007
If you are a sportsman or just interested in keeping fit then this book is most useful.
It is an uncomplicated guide to the anatomy and function of the muscles and ligaments.
Good clear line drawings with the working parts highlighted in red help explain 1)what is going on during motion 2)what can go wrong 3)how to exercise effectively 4) how to stretch effectively and the reasons behind it all.
There is a useful section in the back with the name of every muscle; its place of origin and place of insertion.


True Blue: The Oxford Boat Race Mutiny
True Blue: The Oxford Boat Race Mutiny
by Daniel Topolski
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating true story, 31 July 2007
This was an excellent book by the coach of the Oxford squad in the 1980s Daniel Topolski, they do say truth is strager than fiction, and this book shows its alot more interesting also.
Its a very English moral tale: 'winning is best done by being part of a team and the quest for self glory is not a noble one'. It also quite nicely lays bare the bullying tactics and power play that the Americans are so adept at, fortunately they don't get to be the winners in this story.


C. S. Lewis: A Biography
C. S. Lewis: A Biography
by A. N. Wilson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars C.S.Lewis the man rather than Lewis the icon, 31 July 2007
I found this book un-put-downable, unlike other reviewers here I have not read any other biographies of C.S. Lewis however I have read alot 'per se' and I found Wilson's writing excellent.
I got the impression he was trying to get at the truth of the man and trying to be as impartial as possible. I felt he greatly admired Lewis and his distinctive 'voice' in his writing. Every aspect of his life from his relationship with women to his relationship with God was examined and analysed closely and honestly.I felt it was a compassionate look at Lewis the man rather than Lewis the icon.


Drink and the Victorians: Temperance Question in England, 1815-1872
Drink and the Victorians: Temperance Question in England, 1815-1872
by Brian Harrison
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Today is yesterday, 31 July 2007
If you want to understand the nature of the drinking culture today and you dont want to do any actuall field work, this book is a perfect reflection of the English character. It is a fat book full of detailed analysis and lots of foot notes. It helps if you are interested in 1) history 2) particular histories. It deals with the question of how much drink has played in English life from about the 1700s. It covers extensively the Temperance movement of the 19th and 20th centuries. In a way it is Hogarth in literarary form.


The Diseases of Civilization (Paladin Books)
The Diseases of Civilization (Paladin Books)
by Brian Inglis
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This should be in print, 31 July 2007
This book came across my desk while I was working in reservations at our local library, it was entirely by accident that I read it but I am very glad I did.
It is a densely packed and closely argued book dealing with that most `dodgiest' of professions medicine and its adjuncts. It places medicine and what it has apparently achieved in its historical context, and asks the question, has medicine achieved all that it claims to have achieved? The answer being no. Not only has it failed miserably in its aims and claims but it actually does harm.
Brian Inglis provides a wealth of bibliographic data and numerous citations from all sorts of journals that make it possible to look into this subject if you want to in a lot more depth.


The Long Emergency: Surviving the Converging Catastrophes of the 21st Century
The Long Emergency: Surviving the Converging Catastrophes of the 21st Century
by James Howard Kunstler
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "To our grandfathers and grandchildren, the cavemen....", 31 July 2007
Of all the books I've read and the websites I've browsed on the subject of Peak Oil this has to be the best. This was the book that got me going on the topic of oil depletion and everything I've subsequently read always has its echo (that is Kunstler has said it first) in this work.
I like Kunstler's writing style he eases metaphors and picturesque language into his writing making difficult topics easier for someone like me who is non-scientifically trained to understand.
This book will take you through a swift overview of how civilisations have been built up and let down in the past by their uses of energy, modern civilisation is studied with reference to its sole reliance on oil, once up to date he takes a look at alternatives to oil, of which he concludes none will do and we are bound to face a future rather like our ancestors knew.


Black and White Medicine Show
Black and White Medicine Show
by Donald Gould
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The makers of aspirin wish you had a headache right now, 31 July 2007
Although this book is now nearly 25 years old (I picked up a copy from our local library sale of books section)the content is still very relevant. It is a pretty in depth analysis of the history and 'current' state of medicine.
One of the main issues the author grapples with is the relationship between medicine and the drug barons. It may be summed up in the old phrase 'the makers of aspirin wish you had a headache right now' the drug barons fund most medical research and most literature that reaches your GP comes from the drug lords, so how impartial do you think they will be. One in 6 patients are apparently in hospital due to iatrogenic (doctor induced) causes. This is scary stuff but the author writes with humour so its not too difficult to get to the end of this excellent book.


What Doctors Don't Tell You: The Truth About the Dangers of Modern Medicine
What Doctors Don't Tell You: The Truth About the Dangers of Modern Medicine
by Lynne McTaggart
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.79

45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The medical behemoth challenged, 31 July 2007
I used to be a nurse some years ago and when I read this book I recognised my experience. We all have to place our trust in something or someone in this life but, as this book so ably demonstrates, the medical profession is not necessarily the best place for it. This book (along with a good bibliography) will give you enough amunition to make up your own mind and to go onto further reading.
I think the important thing to remember if you are afraid of challenging medical orthodoxy is they really are only human and they do not possess the answers to all of lifes problems.


Angels: True Stories of How They Touch Our Lives
Angels: True Stories of How They Touch Our Lives
by Hope Price
Edition: Paperback

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Messengers and Guardians, 26 July 2007
Written from a Christian standpoint this is an excellent collection of first hand accounts of encounters with Angels. If your'e feeling a bit low and that God doesn't care about you this is a comforting read.
You wont find Angels in this book giving long theological prognostications though, the closest thing they give to teaching is one story of a man being told its good to pray and try to get close to God. Mostly they seem to appear to individuals as a reasurring presence and occassionally to offer practical help.


Slipper of the Yard
Slipper of the Yard
by Jack Slipper
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I was there book, 26 July 2007
This review is from: Slipper of the Yard (Hardcover)
If you like particular histories this biography of a metropolitan policeman will be of interest.He was born in the early part of the century and trod the beat in the 50s and 60s, catching amongst others the Great Train Robbers in 1965. The book evokes a lost world and a time when crimals actually got 'their just deserts', and the police were public servants.


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