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Karic31 "karic31" (Edinburgh, UK)

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The Economist - UK Edition
The Economist - UK Edition
Price: £9.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Why no Kindle Fire?, 3 Feb 2013
I used to subscribe to this via my old Kindle and at £10 a month it is HALF PRICE that of the actual magazine in the newsstands, so I can only presume all the reviews here moaning about the price are based on an older price I've not seen.

BUT, for Christmas I just got a Kindle Fire (and I'm sure I can't be the only one!) and now I've just discovered the Economist doesn't support it!!! What? So I've had to STOP my subscription when really all I want to do is have it. Why the oversight? When will it be corrected? Hurry up please.


Britannia Unchained: Global Lessons for Growth and Prosperity
Britannia Unchained: Global Lessons for Growth and Prosperity
by Kwasi Kwarteng
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.79

13 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A useful and exciting addition to the debate on Britain's future., 5 Oct 2012
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I'm not a Tory, far from it, I'd consider myself a pragmatist concerned only with promoting those ideas that work.

This is exactly what this book sets out to do, it takes 5 or 6 key failings in Britain today and looks at how other nations have solved them in the past or are currently solving them now. It is written with a sense of (justified) urgency as it sees how the BRIC nations are rapidly developing their global influence - if Britain doesn't get its house in order soon then we're doomed to be left behind as a small nation on the fringes of an EU bloc from which we are isolated. The authors get this and convey it convincingly, but their sense of optimism in Britain's future is contagious. It does energise you to read it, to think that if only we tried this or that we could suddenly emerge from the recession much better placed to thrive in the multi-polar world of tomorrow.

This is not a particularly long book and is well worth a read. It's refreshing to see a reformist zeal among the next generation of Tory MPs and is something I have yet to come across from any similarly minded reformist group of Labour MPs (although I am looking and remain hopeful).

A useful and exciting addition to the debate on Britain's future.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 19, 2012 7:49 PM BST


Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth
Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth
by Andrew Smith
Edition: Paperback

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Reading, 15 April 2007
I am surprised by some of the criticism about this book being to focussed on the author's life and not on those of the astronauts. Yes there is frequent comment about the author's journey in search of the moonwalkers - but that's the point! By using himself as a narrative device he can provide crititcal thinking on what he sees while also highlighting how difficult it can to find the survivors. He was one of the baby boomers that grew up in the US and saw the Apollo landings as a child. He is from the same generation that had such high hopes for the future but then saw it fade away as the Apollo missions were cancelled and the dream died. He is perfectly placed to comment on what he seems to view as a major cultural event more than a major technical acheivement in space flight.

I thought it was a fantastic read which had a lot to say about both the past and present of human space flight in all its dimensions. Well worth the five stars.


Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930's (Galaxy Books)
Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930's (Galaxy Books)
by Donald Worster
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking and insightful, 5 April 2005
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A different approach to traditional US history, whilst taking into account the determined and rugged outlook of the southerners and the freak geological conditions of the period, Worster concludes that it was American culture itself that led to the land being over exploited and resulting in the Dust Bowl.
Graphic and humorous accounts punctuate an excellent analysis of the factors surrounding the Dust Bowl. Whilst his conclusions will no doubt be controversial, especially in America itself (the book opens with a quote from Marx) it is a valuable and powerful contribution to North American environmental history.
It is a pleasure to read to boot. Well worth a look.


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