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Mariam Mays (London, England)

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Xenta DV1013 DIVX and XVID DVD Player
Xenta DV1013 DIVX and XVID DVD Player
Offered by Homemart
Price: 17.62

61 of 66 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars WARNING: Great Machine but NOT MULTI-REGION OUT THE BOX AS ADVERTISED, 9 Dec 2010
This DVD player, is stylish, compact and works great with excellent picture quality. The only problem is that it is being sold as a multi-region player, but it does not work in that capacity straight out of the box.

After a quick google search, I found a blog explaining how very quickly and simply to make it multi-region, and now plays my region 1 and 4 DVDs without a problem. Not sure if amazon allows direct links in reviews, but the blog is called "AJB2K3", got a picture of a man photographing what looks like an old church at the top, and just search for the name of this DVD player.

So overal, great machine for reasonable price, but if you are not not prepared to change the region setting yourself (It's really easy, I have to say) then avoid and find something else.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 28, 2013 6:06 PM GMT


Everybody's Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America
Everybody's Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America
by Gillian Harkins
Edition: Hardcover

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars `I can't answer that right now...', 23 July 2010
Overall, a disappointing book from a disappointing academic. Indeed, on 22nd October 2008 I had the displeasure to attend a research seminar presented by Harkins in preparation for this book on paedophilia and incest. The seminar itself was shambolic enough and the book itself, I have now discovered, is even worse. Essentially, Harkins' argument is that the paedophile often constructed as being a white, middle-aged male and that this construction is inextricably linked to both the well documented `crisis' in masculinity since the end of the Second World War and her own ludicrous and nonsensical idea of `bubbles of unbidden memory' and its remediation.

One of the major ways in which Harkin's argument is flawed, and indeed one of the first points immediately seized upon by academics who attended the research seminar was the complete overlooking, or perhaps deliberate side-stepping, of the role played by Gothic structures and conventions in the narrative construction of the paedophile. Thus, if you are interested in the subject of paedophilia, there are far superior accounts of the cultural imaging of the paedophile in both Ellis Hanson's essay `Queer Gothic' in The Routledge Companion to Gothic (2007) and James Kincaid's astounding study Child-Loving (1992). Thus, I was surprised to find the Harkins eventually titled her study `Everybody's family romance' as, at the time of the research seminar, she was entirely unaware of what `the family romance' (Freud's subversive suggestion that dark and sinister family struggles hold the family unit together, rather than mutual bonds of love and affection) even was. Therefore, it is my contention that she has stolen this idea from Steven Barfield at the University of Westminster, who had to explain to her what it was in the research seminar.

Indeed, at the time Harkins displayed an obstinate unwillingness / inability to answer to any degree the questions posed by the seminar participants. Instead, her answer to any question was simply `Well, I can't answer that right now, but if you give me your details I can get back to you', whilst sneakily jotting down everyone else ideas to later pass off as her own. I shall never forget the filthy look she shot me and my friend when we refused to contribute to the question and answer session and thus she was unable to obtain ideas from us. Furthermore, the desire of the other seminar attendees obtain answers I something I understand and sympathise with, as although the paper proposed to answer why the paedophile (at least in the western world) is commonly depicted as a white, middle-aged and male, the paper simply did not do this. It only stated that there is this common depiction, but did not answer why it exists! A year later, the book provides no further explanation as to why it exists, rendering the entire project futile and pointless. It is shocking to believe that this project was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. I truly thought they had higher standards than that!

Overall, therefore, if you are in any way, shape or form interested in representations of paedophilia, do not purchase this book. Instead either treat yourself to James Kincaid's Child Loving, or see Ellis Hanson's essay in The Routledge Companion to Gothic.


Late Victorian Gothic Tales (Oxford World's Classics)
Late Victorian Gothic Tales (Oxford World's Classics)
by Roger Luckhurst
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

5 of 32 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Stories... Shame About the Introductory Essay!, 29 Jan 2010
This would have been a marvelous addition any collection of Gothic were it not for the abysmal introductory essay which is needlessly convoluted, inaccessible, uninformative, and doges key issues. As such, my recommendation must be that any buyer looking for a collection of Gothic short stories should instead purchase The Oxford Book of Gothic Tales (Oxford Books of Prose & Verse), edited with an introduction by Chris Baldick, who is actually an absolute authority on Gothic literature, unlike the editor of this collection.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 10, 2013 12:23 AM BST


The Trauma Question
The Trauma Question
by Roger Luckhurst
Edition: Paperback
Price: 21.34

1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Does not deliver., 21 Jan 2010
This review is from: The Trauma Question (Paperback)
This is a poorly written, under-researched study that dodges key issues and adds nothing to the newly emergent field of Trauma studies. You will have much better luck with other accounts of the subject of trauma in modern and contemporary society.


Forever England: Femininity, Literature and Conservatism Between the Wars
Forever England: Femininity, Literature and Conservatism Between the Wars
by Alison Light
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Delight - Landmark work in the Study of Middlebrow Literarture and Culture, 15 April 2009
As a student of English Literature, it has been my sad expereince, whilst the reading of primary texts can often be enjoyable, reading secondary "critical" or "theroritcal" texts rarely matches this pleasure. Alison Light's Forever England is an exception to this rule-of-thumb: a study of critically neglected,'middlebrow' writers between the wars (including Daphne du Maurier, Agatha Christie, and Ivy Compton-Burnett), Forever England is an engaging, beautifully crafted, lively study of this rather "frowned upon" (at least by fusty, old, almost fossilised professors) area of literary study. In particular, I very much enjoyed (and agree with) Light's challanging to the society's inccorect homogonisising of Christie's work into a palid, "timeless mulch" representative of the interwar years, when, indeed, her work changes and devlopes enormously from the 1920s-1970s.

Overall, simnply a pleasure to read!


Invisible Monsters
Invisible Monsters
by Chuck Palahniuk
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing! So intense it will stop you from sleeping!, 2 Sep 2008
This review is from: Invisible Monsters (Paperback)
As someone who has recently completed a BA in English Literature it shocks (and worries) me that I can barley even begin articulate just how incredible this book is. Recommend to me by a friend, I was at first sceptical because of the book's basic premise i.e. - the story of a disfigured fashion model, which sounded slightly vacuous and shallow to me. I was extremely wrong! This is a great meaty read, almost overflowing with substance. The text is a great example of literary postmodernism and as such presents a fervent and continuous challenging of our societies established notions of gender, of sexuality, and most definitely of narrative and our assumptions about how a story should be told. In this latter respect I found "Invisible Monsters" reminiscent to the works of Jeanette Winterson, particularly "The Powerbook" and "Lighthousekeeping".

A word of warning though, do not read this novel before you go to bed. I did and for two nights running it seriously disrupted my sleep, which is a testament to just how intense Shannon's narrative is. You will be so totally absorbed into the darkness and twisted logic of her world it becomes very difficult to escape yourself!!

The novel does have its lighter moments though with some great laugh-out-loud comedy, particularly coming from Shannon's parents and their zealous and overcompensative crusade for gay-rights.

An intensely dark, disturbing and thought-provoking classic for our times!
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 6, 2012 6:55 PM GMT


Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction)
Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction)
by Ann Bannon
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging, Inspirational, Entertaining!, 1 May 2008
Just look at that cover! That's a sure sign you're going to be getting a good book. I read Ann Bannon's `Beebo Brinker' recently for my Literature degree, and it is, quite simply, THE best book I have read for at least a year. I've never really understood before when people ay they get "lost" in the words of a book, but that is exactly what happens with this one. It makes for compulsive reading and once started it is very difficult to put down. The plot is fast placed and Bannon's characterisation is amazing. In particular the beautiful and wry Venus Borgardus, whose sophistication and wit resonates though her dialogue: the kind of person who when asked "Do you even know what the inside of the refrigerator looks like?" answers "Of course, darling! I look at it every evening when I put the champagne in to cool". In many ways Venus is the novel's heroine, who is forced to choose between the insatiable call of desire or fame and financial security.

In discussion we found that an unusually large spectrum of people really enjoyed this book: guys and girls, gay and straight, which just demonstrates its wide appeal. But this book (any any other of Ann Bannons books in the series for that matter)! Ann Bannon is an amazing writer who is finally getting the recognition she deserves!


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