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R. Porter "Sound Strategies" (Germany)
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Brand Sense: How to Build Powerful Brands Through Touch, Taste, Smell, Sight and Sound
Brand Sense: How to Build Powerful Brands Through Touch, Taste, Smell, Sight and Sound
by Martin Lindstrom
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sound, words & pictures: 2+2=5, 5 Jun 2007
***** Accessible

***** Inspiring

**** Practical

**** Relevant (to audio branding)

**** Well-grounded

BRAND sense isn't a book (although, without qualification, it's one I recommend that anyone with an interest in business strategy, branding, marketing or communications should read!) It's a fountainhead of inspiration, ideas, and practical approaches via a whole community of innovators in anticipating a future certainty: consumer behaviour, attitudes and expectations of brands are radically changing. In his forward, Philip Kotler puts his finger on the resulting imperative: "Distinctive brands (must) deliver a full sensory and emotional experience ... It pays to attach sound, such as music or powerful words, or symbols. The combination of visual and audio stimuli delivers a 2 + 2 = 5 impact."

The BRAND sense offerings have an evangelical tone of voice you will recognise from the world of internet marketing and social media (be warned, if this is not your thing!). They include a web community at [...] (which you can access free of charge using a unique ID code in the book) plus the weekly video blog BRANDFlash, bring to life the always inciteful words of Benjamin Franklin: "Tell me and I'll forget. Show me and I might remember. Involve me and I'll understand."

As an audio branding specialist, I'm intrigued to what extent Martin's prediction - estimating that 40 per cent of the world's Fortune 500 brands will include a sensory branding strategy in their marketing plan by the end of 2006 - has come true. "Quite simply, their survival will depend on it. If brands want to build and maintain future loyalty, they will have to establish a strategy that appeals to all our senses. This is a fact that no serious brand can ignore." While I agree (well, I would, wouldn't I!), its interesting to map the impact on these views of the continuing fragmentation of the media, and the diversity of way people are engaging with low cost technologies, be they the web, mobile phones, palm held devices, interactive television, touch sensitive displays, and so the list continues.

BRAND sense is a first step down a long road to try to interpret future customer needs, and to create the emotionally-charged brands that meet them.


Sonic Branding: An Introduction: An Essential Guide to the Art and Science of Sonic Branding
Sonic Branding: An Introduction: An Essential Guide to the Art and Science of Sonic Branding
by Daniel M. Jackson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 40.92

3.0 out of 5 stars New Edition Needed, 4 Jun 2007
*** Accessible

*** Inspiring

*** Practical

***** Relevant (to Audio Branding)

*** Well-grounded

There are only a handful of books that focus on the subject of audio branding, particularly in an accessible, jargon-free form that gives practical instruction to those with an interest in integrating sound and music into their business strategy, branding, marketing, and communications. As probably the first such book, Sonic Branding, has the disadvantage of appearing naive in an increasingly sophisticated world. One where consumer behaviour, attitudes and expectations are changing at breakneck speed, and companies are searching for ways to create ever more richly-imbued, emotive, and personally meaningful brands as they strive to be distinctive and reinforce relationships of loyalty and trust.

Sonic Branding is a fairly easy read, and what it lacks in robust research-based underpinning (there is now a huge body or relevant research available), it makes up for in the many anecdotes and examples, predominantly British ones but some more globally recognisable, that it draws upon. The resulting methodology and recommendations need to be `handled with care' in light of this. That said, it's worth reading if only for the insights gained from transcripts of interviews with representatives of the Wolff Olins, Greenhill McCarron, and the Radio Advertising Bureau.

I'd personally welcome a new edition reflecting the passage of time since its 2004 publication, and giving credence to the continuing fragmentation of media and penetration of low cost technologies, such as the web, mobile devices, and interactive TV to name but a few, all of which are hungry for audio content. This more mature edition, will benefit from (1) a deeper application of psychological and commercial research, (2) a tighter focus on the information needs of the reader in light of market factors they face, and (3) a demonstration of how the intervening years consulting in this field have resulted in a more dependable and applicable methodology.


Sound Business
Sound Business
by Julian Treasure
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sound Affects, but will 'Sound Business', 4 Jun 2007
This review is from: Sound Business (Paperback)
** Accessible

*** Inspiring

**** Practical

***** Relevant (to Audio Branding)

** Well-grounded

It will be interesting to see how many such explorations into the sensory aspects of branding will follow the 2005 publication of Martin Lindstrom's BRAND sense (itself a `must read!'). There are few books that focus on the commercial application of the assertion that `sound affects,' particularly written for those charged with integrating sound and music into their business strategy, branding, marketing, and communications. So Treasure's contribution is a welcome one, indeed Lindstrom endorses it as "A great exploration of the science of sound, and the experiential potency it has for building powerful brands."

First the bad news. Sadly, the potentially inspiring ideas in Sound Business are undermined by the too-many-to-be-reliable factual inaccuracies and inadequately verified theories in the first three-quarters of the book. Treasure also gets caught up in the language and excitement of the tools of the trade and his own intriguing set of brand names, which at best is a distraction to shared understanding, and at worst impenetrable. Like Lindstrom, my interests (and to date limitations to us both) are in broader business and brand strategy with a fascination for bringing brands to life. Working daily with experts in this field, I'm more convinced than ever of the rewards and risks of audio branding, and the need for shareable, generally applicable language and methodologies, based upon reliable data. Not to mention the little bit of magic that music brings.

That said, Treasure's strength is in his practical review of the many marketing and physical spaces in which `intentional sound' plays its part in supporting business goals and human relationships, and `noise' or unintentional sound gets in the way of them. He advises that every organisation should have comprehensive audio brand guidelines, detailing its intentional sound including its voice, brand music, sonic logos, advertising sound, product sound (as an asset or a liability), plus shops, offices and all manner of spaces in which we live, work, buy, and take our leisure. A large section is given to the telephone, customer-friendly automation, and the call centre, and many a consumer and business executive will be aware of the many issues here.

Given the continuing fragmentation of media, the high penetration of low cost technologies, such as the web, mobile devices, and interactive TV to name but a few, the lack of attention given to these channels is surprising. I beleive this is a key area where consumer behaviour, attitudes and expectations are changing at breakneck speed, and companies are searching for ways to create ever more richly-imbued, emotive, and personally meaningful brands as they strive to be distinctive and reinforce relationships of loyalty and trust.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 30, 2011 3:52 PM BST


Brand Sense: Build Powerful Brands Through Touch, Taste, Smell, Sight, and Sound
Brand Sense: Build Powerful Brands Through Touch, Taste, Smell, Sight, and Sound
by Philip Kotler
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sound, words & pictures: 2+2=5, 4 Jun 2007
***** Accessible

***** Inspiring

**** Practical

**** Relevant (to audio branding)

**** Well-grounded

BRAND sense isn't a book (although, without qualification, it's one I recommend that anyone with an interest in business strategy, branding, marketing or communications should read!) It's a fountainhead of inspiration, ideas, and practical approaches via a whole community of innovators in anticipating a future certainty: consumer behaviour, attitudes and expectations of brands are radically changing. In his forward, Philip Kotler puts his finger on the resulting imperative: "Distinctive brands (must) deliver a full sensory and emotional experience ... It pays to attach sound, such as music or powerful words, or symbols. The combination of visual and audio stimuli delivers a 2 + 2 = 5 impact."

The BRAND sense offerings have an evangelical tone of voice you will recognise from the world of internet marketing and social media (be warned, if this is not your thing!). They include a web community at [...] (which you can access free of charge using a unique ID code in the book) plus the weekly video blog BRANDFlash, bring to life the always inciteful words of Benjamin Franklin: "Tell me and I'll forget. Show me and I might remember. Involve me and I'll understand."

As an audio branding specialist, I'm intrigued to what extent Martin's prediction - estimating that 40 per cent of the world's Fortune 500 brands will include a sensory branding strategy in their marketing plan by the end of 2006 - has come true. "Quite simply, their survival will depend on it. If brands want to build and maintain future loyalty, they will have to establish a strategy that appeals to all our senses. This is a fact that no serious brand can ignore." While I agree (well, I would, wouldn't I!), its interesting to map the impact on these views of the continuing fragmentation of the media, and the diversity of way people are engaging with low cost technologies, be they the web, mobile phones, palm held devices, interactive television, touch sensitive displays, and so the list continues.

BRAND sense is a first step down a long road to try to interpret future customer needs, and to create the emotionally-charged brands that meet them.


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