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F. de Vocht "Frank" (UK)
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Among Thieves: A Tale of the Kin (Tale of the Kin 1)
Among Thieves: A Tale of the Kin (Tale of the Kin 1)
by Douglas Hulick
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book, 23 Nov. 2012
This is definately one of the best fantasy books i have read recently. The only problem is that I'll have to wait until June for the sequal...


Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets
Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets
by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great, 8 Nov. 2012
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I didnt like "The Black Swan" so much, as testified by my review for that book. This one however, I liked very much. It's a great read; not overly complicated or lost in detail, very entertaining and informative. And without the ego-trip in "The Black Swan".
I would recommend this to anyone really


Prince of Thorns (The Broken Empire, Book 1): 1/3
Prince of Thorns (The Broken Empire, Book 1): 1/3
by Mark Lawrence
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 13-year old rules the world......., 8 Nov. 2012
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This is actually quite an entertaining book, and i will be reading the sequals as well.
.....if only the main character would not have been so young. Had he been described as a 16-yr old I would have doubted it, 17 okish, probably 18 would have been the lower limit for someone killing of multiple men at once in hand-to-hand combat (and much more; he is not a nice boy)...but 12 or 13; it just doesnt work. It is actually quite distracting and annoying, and from book 1 alone there seems no reason to have done this.

Looping back to the beginning; if this sort of thing doesnt annoy you, or if you just read 18 instead of 12/13 (my solution) then it is definately worth the read.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 4, 2013 4:39 PM BST


Stats.con: How We've Been Fooled by Statistics-Based Research in Medicine
Stats.con: How We've Been Fooled by Statistics-Based Research in Medicine
by James Penston
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars BSc dissertation with poorly developed arguments..., 5 Oct. 2012
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I thought this could be an interesting book. Indeed, it is a fairly low-level introduction to the main problems that could occur when statistics are not used correctly (hence, 2 stars).
However, overall there is not much to learn from this book. The author describes a series of things in which statistics could be erroneously used or could be misused. These are issues taught to anyone following a course in statistics at any level. The author communicates an aversion to the use of statistical based studies which essentially boils down to "if you use it wrongly, the results are wrong". This is not really an argument in that this is similar for any academic and non-academic discipline. The author seems to assume that people using statistics work in isolation without taking into account other issues related to causality (such as or example Bradford-Hill criteria), or for that matter are familiar with other methods than univariate statistics.

I was very curious about the alternative the author would present. This would have been worth the read, but unfortunately the author presents no alternative at all.


Secret History of the War on Cancer
Secret History of the War on Cancer
by Devra Davis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting, but with some minor "annoyances", 30 Sept. 2010
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I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. There is a lot of interesting information to be found about unhealthy connections between research on cancer and the industry in the previous century. There are however two drawbacks here that prevent me from giving 4 or 5 stars.
My main issues are with the author's error to look at many of the described issues with hindsight. As a result, she claims that "we" would have saved many lives had we only listened to individual X or took notice of case report Y decades ago since it has turned out that chemical Z is a carcinogen. Although true in hindsight this is only the case because the examples have been cherry-picked, while many 'false positive' examples have been ignored in this book.
Secondly, in my opinion this book could have been written in about half the number of pages if the author had not beefed it up by combining her main, and important, message with an autobiography.
I noticed another review here that mentioned that it is old and out-of-date material, which is somewhat suprising given that the book's title actually includes the word "history"....
Nonetheless, in summary it is well worth the read.


The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable
The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable
by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but an ego-trip, 1 Oct. 2008
I have to agree with most of the other reviews, that although this book is an interesting read which lets you look at some of the problems in "routine statistics in practice" from a different angle.
However, at the same time the book is one big ego-trip with the author being very full of himself and people who share his ideas, while looking down on everyone else. For some reason the authors feels that almost everyone involved in statistics has no idea about the data he or she is working with, no idea of variability of data, and no idea of its shortcomings. Everyone, except himself and some friends...
To illustrate this, the author uses interesting and entertaining examples which make the book a good read. Unfortunately, some of his examples and the thought process used to make his point are flawed.
Nonetheless, i would recommend this book to people routinely working with data just to be aware of the different angles on the same topic in an easy to understand language, while simultaneously being entertained.


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