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Bouldering Essentials: The Complete Guide To Bouldering
Bouldering Essentials: The Complete Guide To Bouldering
by David Flanagan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £20.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading, 20 Oct. 2014
I bought this book for my wife who has been climbing for a while but had recently been taking it a bit more seriously. I, on the other hand, am a novice with only a couple of months indoor experience. I can confidently say that it catered for her requirements (and continues to do so!) and of course there's load in it for me too. It's always a bit brave to include " ... complete guide to ..." anything in a book title, but I can vouch for this one: from safety, to techniques, training, rock types, dynamics and lots of other things I had never known about, this has it all. Moreover, it has LOTS of illustrative and instructional (often sequenced) photographs which will have any outdoor enthusiast drooling. Truly informative and inspirational, I find myself dipping into it time and again.


Karate Stupid
Karate Stupid
by Scott Langley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Angry White Pyjamas meets Moving Zen, 5 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Karate Stupid (Paperback)
I have a space on the shelf for "martial arts related books written by British gentlemen"; Scott Langley's offering now sits comfortably to the left of Mark Law (Judo), C.W.Nicol (Karate) and Robert Twigger (Aikido). This is a personalised account of his 5 years living and working in Japan. He was a karate-ka before going to Japan, but his experiences, especially as a kenshūsei (trainee) on the Japanese karate instructors' course, meant that it was a very different man who boarded the plane to fly home. His story is brutally honest, humorous and intelligent. His western expectations and aspirations frequently spar with a Buddhist-like acceptance as he travels unsteadily along his chosen path. There are, in this regard, shades of Moving Zen interlaced with the harsh physicality described by Twigger. Langley makes many observations of Japanese people and culture but is never disparaging. Some of these he struggles to rationalize, while other aspects become part of his self (or 'not-self'), a spirit distilled through perseverance and pain.
On the face of it, this is a story of survival against a backdrop of karate in Japan, but it also an exploration of physical endurance and how it connects with the human psyche.
There is very little technical jargon which makes it wholly accessible, and makes for an easy read. But at the same time this book will be thoroughly enjoyed by those who have an interest in budō and/or Japan.


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