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Machiavelli "Machiavelli" (London)

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A Brief History of Crime
A Brief History of Crime
by Peter Hitchens
Edition: Hardcover

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and thought-provoking, 2 Feb 2004
This book will be cordially-loathed by the left-wing, self-styled elite - and very much welcomed by ordinary people who want to feel safe in their homes and on the streets. Much of what is to be found here mirrors experience that many of us today have of the police - I was told by the police when I reported my car stolen that they would issue me with a crime- reference number for the insurance claim but they would not investigate its disappearance. Hitchens raises some very pertinent questions, and rakes over some very interesting historical and contemporary information to make what seems an unanswerable case. This book should be required reading for every police constable, every politician and a vade-mecum for the Home Secretary.


A Handful Of Dust [1988] [DVD]
A Handful Of Dust [1988] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Jackson Kyle
Offered by PickleTickle
Price: 14.98

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable, 27 Jan 2004
Charles Sturridge was also responsible for Brideshead Revisited: here he has considerably less time to capture the essence of what (for me) is a far better book, and it shows. That being said, Kristin Scott Thomas is brilliant at capturing the essence of the beautiful but cold Brenda, and Judy Dench plays the arriviste Mrs. Beaver superbly. Despite a good performance by Rupert Graves, it is not entirely clear, however, what John Beaver has that so enthrals Brenda. James Wilby is excellent as the ingenu Tony (although there are points where you want to slap him) and Alec Guinness is all too convincing in the quietly horrific last act of the film. Definitely worth seeing.


Maxims
Maxims
by Francois,Duc De La Rochefoucauld
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensible, 27 Jan 2004
This review is from: Maxims (Hardcover)
La Rochefoucauld's maxims contain much wisdom in few words. Epigrammatic, profound, and an indispensible addition to anyone's bookshelf.


Typhoon
Typhoon
by Robin White
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 27 Jan 2004
This review is from: Typhoon (Hardcover)
I bought this hoping for a beach book - a solid, workmanlike read in a genre that Tom Clancy has largely made his own. I got much more: this was thoroughly enjoyable, concentrating more on the characters and less on the technology of submarine warfare (although there is plenty of the latter). Clancy's submariners are noble, fearless, dedicated - and a little dull but made interesting by circumstances: White peoples his US submarine with a far more disparate crew, such that we have the good, the mad, and the ugly blending in a narrative that owes as much to 'The Caine Mutiny' and 'Crimson Tide' as to 'The Hunt for Red October'. My only complaint is with some sloppy editing ("well" for "we'll" and "hell" for "he'll"), but that does not derogate from the author's considerable achievement in writing a tale I would have found unputdownable were it not for the regrettable necessity of having to go to work.


Nobody's Perfect: Writings from the New Yorker
Nobody's Perfect: Writings from the New Yorker
by Anthony Lane
Edition: Hardcover

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very funny, 16 July 2003
I bought this yesterday - I picked it off the shelf because I vaguely remember seeing it (very positively) reviewed late last year. In the shop I read his review of "The Saint" (with which I agreed) and of "Stealing Beauty" (with which I disagreed largely, I admit, out of lazy sentimentality), but both made me laugh out loud such that other customers started edging away with sidelong looks. So I bought it and spent the evening with my wife, both of us howling with laughter at "Best-Sellers I" which is like a literary tour written by Bill Bryson (in one of his earlier books) - and I mean that as a compliment to both Messrs Lane and Bryson. His re-writing of Robert Frost in the style of Clive Cussler is simply brilliant, as is his Judith Krantz haiku. For any intelligent film- or book-lover, this is a must-buy.


Killing Floor (Jack Reacher)
Killing Floor (Jack Reacher)
by Lee Child
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly readable, 10 Feb 2003
Jack Reacher, the hero of this and five subsequent novels, is the creation of Lee Childs, andEnglishman who writes the definitive American novel-noir. This is the only book of the series to be written in the first person, something I hadn't noticed until I went back and re-read it, but it conveys vividly the landscape and the people-scape of mid-America. These books are head-and-shoulders above the usual thriller-lit and are thoroughly recommended. Both my wife (who is Romanian) and I read this in one sitting.


By the Sword: A History of Gladiators, Musketeers, Duelists, Samurai, Swashbucklers and Points of Honour
By the Sword: A History of Gladiators, Musketeers, Duelists, Samurai, Swashbucklers and Points of Honour
by Richard Cohen
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 8 Jan 2003
This is a thoroughly entertaining read for fencer and non-fencer alike - plenty of good boy's own antics coupled with genuine scholarship on both the art of the swordsman and the equally important art of the swordsmith. Engrossing, erudite and readable.


Once Upon a Distant War: Reporting from Vietnam
Once Upon a Distant War: Reporting from Vietnam
by William Prochnau
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended, 8 Jan 2003
This is one of the best books about Vietnam I have ever read. As a guide to what it was like to be a war correspondent in Vietnam it stands on a level with Jack Laurence's "The Cat from Hue". In fact, chronologically, the two combine nicely: the era of Halberstam, Sheehan, Mohr and Sully gave way to the television journalism of Laurence's generation, so read this and then read "The Cat from Hue" - both essential reading for anyone interested in Vietnam yesterday or today.


The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America and Neither Here nor There
The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America and Neither Here nor There
by Bill Bryson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 12.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The funniest books I have ever read, 20 Jan 2000
I never laugh at loud at books. A wry smile on occasion, but never more than that. I almost died laughing reading these. There is a description of blow-up dolls in the shop windows on the Reeperbahn in Hamburg which I read on the Paris Metro, and I was laughing so much that I missed my stop. Bemused Parisians were watching me and asking "What is 'e on and where can I get some?". Buy this book - better than drugs, almost better than sex.


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