Profile for constantine > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by constantine
Top Reviewer Ranking: 216,795
Helpful Votes: 15

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
constantine

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Quiet Gentleman
The Quiet Gentleman
Price: £2.62

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 9 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Her funniest novel.


An Infamous Army
An Infamous Army
Price: £3.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Unbeaten, 23 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: An Infamous Army (Kindle Edition)
The best account of the battle of Waterloo (having a staff officer - delivering messages across the battlefield - as the third person perspective means you experience the whole battle) with an excellent love story thrown in for free


There's Always Something to Do: The Peter Cundill Investment Approach
There's Always Something to Do: The Peter Cundill Investment Approach

4.0 out of 5 stars Starry eyed Boswell goes trawling through the gutter, 14 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Slightly dewy eyed in its appreciation of its subject, it earns its purchase through a trail of well detailed case study investments in the (deep) value discipline. A few more 'failed' investments would be instructive. His track record, whilst impressive, isn't quite amazing enough to deserve such adulation. The philosophy, whilst a good one, isn't quite strong enough for its flaws to be so glossed over.


Selected Poems: with parallel German text (Oxford World's Classics)
Selected Poems: with parallel German text (Oxford World's Classics)

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Kindled anger at the laziness of publishers, 14 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent poems, a great translation, massacred by the publishers of the kindle edition. I have the hard copy but wanted it on my kindle/phone as well to keep with me when i traveled. With poetry, more than anything else, people want to re-read the texts and keep them close. It may be a small niche to the publishers but if they get it right it should be profitable as customers may often be willing to buy multiple formats and (in the case of foreign poetry) multiple translations. The digital version scrambles the original German with the translation in such a way that suggests no human ever looked at it before sending the text off to amazon. It wouldn't take more than an hour to put back in order. Incredible given the troubles publishers claim they are going through at the moment not to even try and engage with the opportunities of the new medium.


Who Rules South Africa?
Who Rules South Africa?
Price: £11.15

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Incisive, 14 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A tiny bit out of date given the smooth passing of the ANC meeting in December 2012 which they posited as a potential break point. It would also be interesting to hear their view of what a South Africa in which the tripartite alliance has collapsed looks like. Other than that it is excellent and gave me a good understanding of the political background to the country on a recent visit. Essentially a collection of interlinked essays/investigations: clearly researched and concisely written in a terse, rather gripping style.


Ice
Ice
Price: £5.97

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Reaching for effect, 22 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Ice (Kindle Edition)
Some catching phrases and images here but the uniformity of season she has imposed on herself is not charged with any real strength in content. Too many of the poems seem culled from newspaper articles or a view from a wintry cottage window.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 7, 2013 4:52 PM BST


Ploughshares Spring 1987 Guest-Edited by Derek Walcott
Ploughshares Spring 1987 Guest-Edited by Derek Walcott
Price: £4.47

4.0 out of 5 stars Patchy brilliance, 22 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It's great to have a collection chosen by Walcott who's modest introduction gets swiftly out of the way and lets his selection of favourite poems do the talking. This is already a refreshing difference from the critic's introduction which imposes 30 pages of analysis you wade through, nervous of missing something and exhausted by the time you reach p1 of the text. The difference between the man who drives the car and the one who gives the directions i suppose.
The poems themselves are equally unusual. There were plenty i disliked but a good few i loved and you won't find them elsewhere, by and large. Pitkethly's 'Return of the native' is excellent and none of his poems are easily obtainable as far as i can see (on the internet he's not even mentioned as a poet). It is a long narrative poem in which he returns to his native northern Ireland and talks to his dead and very different father in the front seat of an old car in the woods. As his tour of the province unspools, his father and the country's differences both then and now haunt him in a way every son must feel. The particularity and phantasmagoria of vision animates a part of the world i know nothing about and will always visualise as he has painted it.


City of London: The History
City of London: The History
Price: £6.99

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars fatal flaw, 21 Sep 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have to agree with the 'frustrating' review. This is an excellent and surprisingly involving history of the financial powerhouse of the world. It is well written and balances an overview of the modern age's formation with particular anecdotes and personalities. BUT it desperately needs a glossary of terms. I work in fund management and yet even to me many of the terms are archaic or have now taken on different meanings. Perhaps the book is a victim of its otherwise excellent editing: apparently this was originally a quartet of books and maybe the longer volumes fleshed out some of the mechanics in greater detail. Perhaps it is a victim of its intrinsically complex subject matter and has opted to plough forward frictionless through centuries of information-overload. Either way too much is taken for granted which is a shame because for a little more explication this could be a really accessible and topical history. Enough for television producers to think about a series.


Page: 1