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Pompey 54 (Scotland)

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THE COMPLETE PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE (Illustrated and Commented Edition) All of William Shakespeare's Unabridged Plays AND Yale Critical Analysis) THE COMPLETE ... (The Complete Works of Shakespeare Book 1)
THE COMPLETE PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE (Illustrated and Commented Edition) All of William Shakespeare's Unabridged Plays AND Yale Critical Analysis) THE COMPLETE ... (The Complete Works of Shakespeare Book 1)
Price: £1.99

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not quite what he wrote, 30 Mar. 2012
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Although this is quite comprehensive, the actual text leaves much to be desired at times. I've only read two of the comedies so far but have found several typos. These are, at best, annoying. For example, in Much Ado, Don Pedro is referred to as 'Don Peter' at first then suddenly becomes Don Pedro. At the end of this play, Don John is described as 'fed and gone' - kind of them to give him a good dinner after all his villainy! Try 'fled and gone', which makes a lot more sense. I do find it irritating that often, a character's name is the bottom line of one page and the actual speech begins on the next. Surely it's not rocket science to match these up so that reading the text flows?
I wouldn't recommend this to anyone needing an accurate text to study the plays.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 17, 2012 4:17 PM BST


The Radio Ballads: The Song Of Steel
The Radio Ballads: The Song Of Steel
Price: £7.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New songs for old tales, 20 Nov. 2011
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To follow in the footsteps of the original radio ballads was a bold move. Some of the modern attempts are more successful than others, but this is the best. The songs tell the stories of ordinary people in what was, in fact, an extraordinary industry in the Don Valley. The voices of those people are interspersed with music and the sounds of the steel mills themselves, like the great thundering hammers which deafened half of Sheffield. The music is a fabulous mixture: John Tams swaggering off to get a job at Steelos, or the plaintive voice of Kate Rusby trying to keep her home clean in the filthy atmosphere of the valley. Every track is a delight. The steel industry is long gone, ground into the dirt by Thatcher. But this album will make sure the hard work and pride of the steel workers will outlive her.


Blood Runner
Blood Runner
by James Riordan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another winner from a great writer, 6 Nov. 2011
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This review is from: Blood Runner (Paperback)
James Riordan's last book for young (and older!) people took us to Stalingrad, where we froze in the icy winter along with his Sniper. This time, he takes us to the heat of South Africa and the struggle against apartheid. Riordan tells great stories. He has a flair for description but also can make us live with his characters. In Blood Runner, we read about Samuel and his family who experience the horrors of racism. But as with The Sniper, we are left believing that it is possible to change the world for the better. I had a lump in my throat as Samuel crossed the finish line. Loved it!


The Pattern in the Carpet: A Personal History with Jigsaws
The Pattern in the Carpet: A Personal History with Jigsaws
by Margaret Drabble
Edition: Hardcover

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written, 7 Jun. 2009
Drabble's writing is always a pleasure; this is no exception. She tells of her family (on which she based her wonderful novel 'The Peppered Moth') and her memories of growing up in South Yorkshire. The book is shot through with a gentle melancholy: suffering from depression, Drabble uses jigsaws as a way of making order out of chaos. There are at times too many details of the history of jigsaws and board games - the book she originally sat down to write - but as a personal narrative and exploration of how we make sense of our lives, it's a great read.


Making It Up
Making It Up
by Penelope Lively
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A view of England, 14 Feb. 2009
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This review is from: Making It Up (Paperback)
Described as 'fictional autobiography', this is one of Lively's best books. It's far from being a novel; in a series of short stories, linked by a preface with details of her own life, Lively takes us through the second half of the 20th century. There is a real sense of England in these tales: expatriates fleeing the German advance through North Africa, a young man on National Service in Korea, a secondhand bookseller, students on an archaeological dig. All are told in Lively's engaging style. I read this in an afternoon, quite unable to put it down.


Rachmaninov Vespers and Complete All-Night Vigil
Rachmaninov Vespers and Complete All-Night Vigil
Price: £13.25

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A joy to hear, 14 Feb. 2009
When Rachmaninov first played the Nunc Dimittis to the conductor in preparation for the first performance, Danilin was doubtful about the range required for the basses, wondering where such singers could be found. Rachmaninov had no doubts: "I knew the voices of my countrymen". The Estonian Chamber Choir do full justice to the composer's confidence, maintaining their immaculate reputation with this performance. They sing smoothly, with heartfelt emotion. The sound is rich and satisfying: one not to be missed.


Somewhere Towards the End
Somewhere Towards the End
by Diana Athill
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different life, 14 Feb. 2009
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Athill's autobiography deals honestly with the pitfalls of ageing, while looking back over her life and loves. It's a fascinating account although her coolness of approach and sense of detachment did not make me warm to her. Having said that, her honesty is to be admired, as is her optimism. She writes well and gives a real insight into herself and her thoughts 'towards the end'.


Will
Will
by Christopher Rush
Edition: Hardcover

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A way with words, 11 Jan. 2009
This review is from: Will (Hardcover)
Every so often, a novel comes along which breaks the mould - this is one of them. Shakespeare lies on his deathbed, talking his life to his lawyer as they write his will. The magic of the plays' language is Rush's warp and weft, yet he also writes with his own lyrical poetry. The story encompasses much of life in Elizabethan England, its joys and terrors. Will becomes their observer, or relates stories he was told. Rush weaves in some of the speculation on Shakepeare's life (the time supposedly spent in Lancashire presented as fact, for example) along with the little we know to be true, and the result is one of those books you know you'll love for ever. History, biography, a love story, a lust story, a player's tale. Hard to do better than this.


Just Henry (Costa Book Award - Children's Book Award)
Just Henry (Costa Book Award - Children's Book Award)
by Michelle Magorian
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too long at 700 pages, 10 Jan. 2009
Magorian is a great storyteller and this is a strong narrative, but goes into far too much detail at times. More is not always better.... She has obviously done a great deal of research about cinema and cameras of the era, but I do wish she hadn't used all of it. There are some neat twists in Henry's tale, though I felt many of them were solved too easily by the character of Mrs Beaumont. Children's fiction does not have to have all its ends tied up quite so neatly and easily. I agree with 'Catwolf': the characters seem to be around 11, not 15. Some great period details, though, and it's an enjoyable read, but not one I should want to go back to.


The Sniper
The Sniper
by James Riordan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A chilling tale, 23 Nov. 2008
This review is from: The Sniper (Paperback)
The lyrical opening of James Riordan's `The Sniper' must be one of the most evocative in children's fiction. Riordan goes on to explore the violence and savagery of war though its effect on his young heroine, Tania Belova. Her early dreams of a career in medicine gradually give way - at first with genuine qualms, finally with none - to a fierce desire to rid her beloved Stalingrad of its Nazi menace.
One of the many strengths of this novel is its vivid depiction of life in the besieged city, informed by Riordan's knowledge and understanding of the period. Tania's tale and the exploration of her character are woven seamlessly into the foul and dangerous reality of Stalingrad.
Riordan is a consummate teller of tales for young people. This is one of his best.


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