Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now
Profile for John R. Wade > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by John R. Wade
Top Reviewer Ranking: 36,931
Helpful Votes: 657

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
John R. Wade "john24526"
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
[(Why We Can't Afford the Rich)] [Author: Andrew Sayer] published on (April, 2015)
[(Why We Can't Afford the Rich)] [Author: Andrew Sayer] published on (April, 2015)
by Andrew Sayer
Edition: Hardcover

1.0 out of 5 stars If he knows what he's talking about, he hides it well., 1 Feb. 2016
Normally, when I sit down to read a book, I like to finish it. A few noteworthy examples have defeated me: 'Ninja Nuns', a soft porn kung fu romp, both 'Glory Road' and 'Number of the Beast' by Heinlein - tedious self reverential codswallop, Balzac's 'A Harlot High and Low' - perhaps it lost something in the translation, and now this.
And I must say, I made far more progress with the others than I did with this work.
I set out to make notes as I find the subject fascinating, but by page 61 was shaking my head so violently I could no longer focus on the print and knew it had joined the select group of 'too bad to read even for a laugh' listed above. And here's why:

The book opens with the observation that in the 22 years following the second world war (the 'golden age' of capitalism) wealth was accumulated by the working class much faster than it was by the property owning class. Without so much as a nod towards the war. I was dumbfounded. As happened following the Bubonic plague killed off a vast swathe of the population, reducing the availability of labour increases its price. In the case of the plague, wages doubles and efficiency improvements lead to, for instance, windmills which could be operated by one or two labourers instead of six. In the case of WW2, auto production per worker increased dramatically, for example. (And the cars are a whole lot better - motoring, once a rich mans' hobby, is available to almost everyone)
Reducing the availability of labour increases its price which spurs innovation and progress. It's one of the reasons the Southern US 'slave' states were left behind by the North - the spur to innovate was less. For myself, I think killing a whole bunch of workers to improve the lot of the rest is too high a price, so favour less dramatic interventions like education.
On Page 15, the author speaks of 'the consequence of privatising state monopolies' in reference to telecoms magnate Carlos Helu. Well, I buy my phone, gas, electric water, and doubtless other services from perfectly acceptable former state monopolies and so I can only conclude what the author meant was 'the consequence of ineptly privatising state monopolies' and if he'd said that it would have made sense. Monopolies just serve to stitch up their customers and it's the job of the state to bust them up, not run them or preserve them.
By page 16 he says neoliberalism assumes markets 'work best with the minimum of regulation' with reference to banking regulation. The problem wasn't 'minimum' regulation, it was incompetent regulation. Oddly, he doesn't finger G. Brown or E. Balls as the responsible parties.
On P 21 he suggests 'future generations will never be able to pay their parents back' which might sound convincing on first read, but with rising national and intergenerational debts, the reverse may also be equally true for many.
By P28 when he suggested 'the answer to your objection may lie a few pages on' I was starting to think the answer to my objection was the round metal receptacle in the corner. Turns out I was right.
On page 45, when he claimed 'unearned income based on control of assets has no warrant other than power' I scarcely batted an eyelid. I was becoming numbed to his bullsh*t. For the vast majority of human history the natural state of people like me has been slavery or peonage and it is power which keeps me from being subjugated.
Finally, of P55 he launched into an incomprehensible diatribe about celebrities benefitting from the 'inherited asset' of their genes making them more attractive or better at sports and I put the book in the bin. Anyone with any interest in the mid 20th century knows where that leads. He didn't even have the bottle to take his notion to its' conclusion, waffling instead about how it didn't matter as their high earnings are due to voluntary payment. Has he touched upon our 'cultural inheritance' - the English language, the common law, and soforth, as laid out by Niall Fergusson in his vastly superior 'Civilisation: The West and The Rest' He'd have scraped 2 ticks.
In short, this is a deeply disappointing book. I'm glad I didn't pay for it. I'm sad I stick with it so long, as life is too short to read such bobbins, and I strongly recommend anyone considering buying it put such folly from their minds immediately.


Why We Can't Afford the Rich by Sayer, Andrew (November 1, 2015) Paperback
Why We Can't Afford the Rich by Sayer, Andrew (November 1, 2015) Paperback
by Andrew Sayer
Edition: Paperback

1.0 out of 5 stars If he knows what he's talking about, he hides it well., 1 Feb. 2016
Normally, when I sit down to read a book, I like to finish it. A few noteworthy examples have defeated me: 'Ninja Nuns', a soft porn kung fu romp, both 'Glory Road' and 'Number of the Beast' by Heinlein - tedious self reverential codswallop, Balzac's 'A Harlot High and Low' - perhaps it lost something in the translation, and now this.
And I must say, I made far more progress with the others than I did with this work.
I set out to make notes as I find the subject fascinating, but by page 61 was shaking my head so violently I could no longer focus on the print and knew it had joined the select group of 'too bad to read even for a laugh' listed above. And here's why:

The book opens with the observation that in the 22 years following the second world war (the 'golden age' of capitalism) wealth was accumulated by the working class much faster than it was by the property owning class. Without so much as a nod towards the war. I was dumbfounded. As happened following the Bubonic plague killed off a vast swathe of the population, reducing the availability of labour increases its price. In the case of the plague, wages doubles and efficiency improvements lead to, for instance, windmills which could be operated by one or two labourers instead of six. In the case of WW2, auto production per worker increased dramatically, for example. (And the cars are a whole lot better - motoring, once a rich mans' hobby, is available to almost everyone)
Reducing the availability of labour increases its price which spurs innovation and progress. It's one of the reasons the Southern US 'slave' states were left behind by the North - the spur to innovate was less. For myself, I think killing a whole bunch of workers to improve the lot of the rest is too high a price, so favour less dramatic interventions like education.
On Page 15, the author speaks of 'the consequence of privatising state monopolies' in reference to telecoms magnate Carlos Helu. Well, I buy my phone, gas, electric water, and doubtless other services from perfectly acceptable former state monopolies and so I can only conclude what the author meant was 'the consequence of ineptly privatising state monopolies' and if he'd said that it would have made sense. Monopolies just serve to stitch up their customers and it's the job of the state to bust them up, not run them or preserve them.
By page 16 he says neoliberalism assumes markets 'work best with the minimum of regulation' with reference to banking regulation. The problem wasn't 'minimum' regulation, it was incompetent regulation. Oddly, he doesn't finger G. Brown or E. Balls as the responsible parties.
On P 21 he suggests 'future generations will never be able to pay their parents back' which might sound convincing on first read, but with rising national and intergenerational debts, the reverse may also be equally true for many.
By P28 when he suggested 'the answer to your objection may lie a few pages on' I was starting to think the answer to my objection was the round metal receptacle in the corner. Turns out I was right.
On page 45, when he claimed 'unearned income based on control of assets has no warrant other than power' I scarcely batted an eyelid. I was becoming numbed to his bullsh*t. For the vast majority of human history the natural state of people like me has been slavery or peonage and it is power which keeps me from being subjugated.
Finally, of P55 he launched into an incomprehensible diatribe about celebrities benefitting from the 'inherited asset' of their genes making them more attractive or better at sports and I put the book in the bin. Anyone with any interest in the mid 20th century knows where that leads. He didn't even have the bottle to take his notion to its' conclusion, waffling instead about how it didn't matter as their high earnings are due to voluntary payment. Has he touched upon our 'cultural inheritance' - the English language, the common law, and soforth, as laid out by Niall Fergusson in his vastly superior 'Civilisation: The West and The Rest' He'd have scraped 2 ticks.
In short, this is a deeply disappointing book. I'm glad I didn't pay for it. I'm sad I stick with it so long, as life is too short to read such bobbins, and I strongly recommend anyone considering buying it put such folly from their minds immediately.


Mitre Astro Division Football - White/Blue/Silver, Size 5
Mitre Astro Division Football - White/Blue/Silver, Size 5
Price: £18.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Good all round general play ball., 31 Jan. 2016
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This has become my little boy's ball of choice, perhaps as it seems impervious to water and it's been a bit wet.

I couldn't find what it's made of - I guess PU, and it's slick surface means it's pretty fast if like me you don't have a pressure gauge and just blow it up with a foot pump until it feels 'about right'.

I know leather is traditional and so on, but sometimes synthetics are easier to live with.


Why We Can't Afford the Rich
Why We Can't Afford the Rich
by Andrew Sayer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If the author knows what he's talking about, he hides it well., 31 Jan. 2016
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Normally, when I sit down to read a book, I like to finish it. A few noteworthy examples have defeated me: 'Ninja Nuns', a soft porn kung fu romp, both 'Glory Road' and 'Number of the Beast' by Heinlein - tedious self reverential codswallop, Balzac's 'A Harlot High and Low' - perhaps it lost something in the translation, and now this.
And I must say, I made far more progress with the others than I did with this work.
I set out to make notes as I find the subject fascinating, but by page 61 was shaking my head so violently I could no longer focus on the print and knew it had joined the select group of 'too bad to read even for a laugh' listed above. And here's why:

The book opens with the observation that in the 22 years following the second world war (the 'golden age' of capitalism) wealth was accumulated by the working class much faster than it was by the property owning class. Without so much as a nod towards the war. I was dumbfounded. As happened following the Bubonic plague killed off a vast swathe of the population, reducing the availability of labour increases its price. In the case of the plague, wages doubles and efficiency improvements lead to, for instance, windmills which could be operated by one or two labourers instead of six. In the case of WW2, auto production per worker increased dramatically, for example. (And the cars are a whole lot better - motoring, once a rich mans' hobby, is available to almost everyone)
Reducing the availability of labour increases its price which spurs innovation and progress. It's one of the reasons the Southern US 'slave' states were left behind by the North - the spur to innovate was less. For myself, I think killing a whole bunch of workers to improve the lot of the rest is too high a price, so favour less dramatic interventions like education.
On Page 15, the author speaks of 'the consequence of privatising state monopolies' in reference to telecoms magnate Carlos Helu. Well, I buy my phone, gas, electric water, and doubtless other services from perfectly acceptable former state monopolies and so I can only conclude what the author meant was 'the consequence of ineptly privatising state monopolies' and if he'd said that it would have made sense. Monopolies just serve to stitch up their customers and it's the job of the state to bust them up, not run them or preserve them.
By page 16 he says neoliberalism assumes markets 'work best with the minimum of regulation' with reference to banking regulation. The problem wasn't 'minimum' regulation, it was incompetent regulation. Oddly, he doesn't finger G. Brown or E. Balls as the responsible parties.
On P 21 he suggests 'future generations will never be able to pay their parents back' which might sound convincing on first read, but with rising national and intergenerational debts, the reverse may also be equally true for many.
By P28 when he suggested 'the answer to your objection may lie a few pages on' I was starting to think the answer to my objection was the round metal receptacle in the corner. Turns out I was right.
On page 45, when he claimed 'unearned income based on control of assets has no warrant other than power' I scarcely batted an eyelid. I was becoming numbed to his bullsh*t. For the vast majority of human history the natural state of people like me has been slavery or peonage and it is power which keeps me from being subjugated.
Finally, of P55 he launched into an incomprehensible diatribe about celebrities benefitting from the 'inherited asset' of their genes making them more attractive or better at sports and I put the book in the bin. Anyone with any interest in the mid 20th century knows where that leads. He didn't even have the bottle to take his notion to its' conclusion, waffling instead about how it didn't matter as their high earnings are due to voluntary payment. Has he touched upon our 'cultural inheritance' - the English language, the common law, and soforth, as laid out by Niall Fergusson in his vastly superior 'Civilisation: The West and The Rest' He'd have scraped 2 ticks.
In short, this is a deeply disappointing book. I'm glad I didn't pay for it. I'm sad I stick with it so long, as life is too short to read such bobbins, and I strongly recommend anyone considering buying it put such folly from their minds immediately.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 8, 2016 1:00 PM GMT


Getting By: Estates, Class and Culture in Austerity Britain by Lisa Mckenzie (January 14, 2015) Paperback
Getting By: Estates, Class and Culture in Austerity Britain by Lisa Mckenzie (January 14, 2015) Paperback
by Lisa Mckenzie
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A badly organized and repetetive collection of anecdotes, 17 Jan. 2016
That probably looks a bit damning, but it's not without merit. First up: What don't I like:

It's repetitive. Once I'd read how interview respondents thought outsiders thought them 'rough and ready ' for the fifth time and how they were 'racialised and sexualised' my eyes glazed over. Some editing would have helped. I think this could be cut by at least 40%

And what I thought was of interest:

A respondent says they don't want a 'gay' job in a callcentre. The labour party was formed to represent people who earn a living selling their labour, and the respondents are refusing to sell their labour, one might conclude they are rejecting being 'working class' which to them is doubtless a rational choice. After all, they have to compete with 200m Eastern Europeans who see those 'gay' jobs they reject as a step up and are willing to travel across Europe to do them. This isn't really a study of the working class, it's a study of the post working class, those who have given up.

And the author opines this is the fault of the government: Whereas it is the duty of the British Government to act in the best interest of the British polity, this is manifestly true, and to illustrate this I offer an anecdote of my own: In 1992 the local men's hostel was running an programme with a bus company to help their residents get clean and get jobs as bus crews. Now, all the bus crews are cheerful Eastern Europeans, and th programme abandoned.

If the 'bottom 10%' are in competition with people with master's degrees who will travel thousands of miles to countries where they don't speak the language to work for the minimum wage, then they are in trouble. I live next door to a 3 bed semi where 7 Eastern Europeans, all with blue collar jobs, live. They have lower expectations than our own former working class, and are much better qualified.

There are three ways to increase the price of a commodity, in this case, labour:
Improve it's quality (that's not being done)
Reduce the supply (the government are determined to increase it as fast as possible)
Legislate.

This won't end well. If labour isn't worth the statutory price, then it won't be bought.


[(Getting by: Estates, Class and Culture in Austerity Britain)] [Author: Lisa Mckenzie] published on (March, 2015)
[(Getting by: Estates, Class and Culture in Austerity Britain)] [Author: Lisa Mckenzie] published on (March, 2015)
by Lisa Mckenzie
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars A bdly organized and repetetive collection of anecdotes, 17 Jan. 2016
That probably looks a bit damning, but it's not without merit. First up: What don't I like:

It's repetitive. Once I'd read how interview respondents thought outsiders thought them 'rough and ready ' for the fifth time and how they were 'racialised and sexualised' my eyes glazed over. Some editing would have helped. I think this could be cut by at least 40%

And what I thought was of interest:

A respondent says they don't want a 'gay' job in a callcentre. The labour party was formed to represent people who earn a living selling their labour, and the respondents are refusing to sell their labour, one might conclude they are rejecting being 'working class' which to them is doubtless a rational choice. After all, they have to compete with 200m Eastern Europeans who see those 'gay' jobs they reject as a step up and are willing to travel across Europe to do them. This isn't really a study of the working class, it's a study of the post working class, those who have given up.

And the author opines this is the fault of the government: Whereas it is the duty of the British Government to act in the best interest of the British polity, this is manifestly true, and to illustrate this I offer an anecdote of my own: In 1992 the local men's hostel was running an programme with a bus company to help their residents get clean and get jobs as bus crews. Now, all the bus crews are cheerful Eastern Europeans, and th programme abandoned.

If the 'bottom 10%' are in competition with people with master's degrees who will travel thousands of miles to countries where they don't speak the language to work for the minimum wage, then they are in trouble. I live next door to a 3 bed semi where 7 Eastern Europeans, all with blue collar jobs, live. They have lower expectations than our own former working class, and are much better qualified.

There are three ways to increase the price of a commodity, in this case, labour:
Improve it's quality (that's not being done)
Reduce the supply (the government are determined to increase it as fast as possible)
Legislate.

This won't end well. If labour isn't worth the statutory price, then it won't be bought.


Kapselheber Puro
Kapselheber Puro
Offered by JoP-Shop_1
Price: £19.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Elegant and durable bottle opener., 14 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Kapselheber Puro (Kitchen & Home)
Okay, so it's a bottle opener, but it's also elegantly styled and durable. The machining could be a bit better, but I don't think I'm going to wear it out.


Precise Engineered Oakey Lib Green Roll 10M x 115mm 120G 30395 [Pack of 1] - w/3yr Rescu3® Warranty
Precise Engineered Oakey Lib Green Roll 10M x 115mm 120G 30395 [Pack of 1] - w/3yr Rescu3® Warranty
Offered by JEKISSA
Price: £69.00

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 year warranty? How?, 14 Jan. 2016
Okay, I gots to ask, how do I claim on the 3 year warranty as I use a roll of this every 4 months and this could be quite a sweet deal.

It's good paper, I use nothing but. But I pay £16 a roll and so should you.


Philips Sonicare HX6511/43 EasyClean White Rechargeable Toothbrush
Philips Sonicare HX6511/43 EasyClean White Rechargeable Toothbrush
Price: £34.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Basic and functional., 13 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I had the more expensive flexcare but never used the various features so when it died I got this. For my needs, it's indistinguishable.


Le Creuset Cast Iron Large Rectangular Grill Pan, 24 cm - Satin Black
Le Creuset Cast Iron Large Rectangular Grill Pan, 24 cm - Satin Black
Price: £67.32

2.0 out of 5 stars Too small., 13 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I hoped I could cook 3 steaks on this, but it's just a bit too small. The folding handle is annoying, but that's no big deal


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20