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N. Dodd (England)
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BlueRigger 3.5mm Male to Male Stereo Audio Cable (4 Feet) 1.2 Meters- Supports iPhone, iPod, Android and other Smartphones
BlueRigger 3.5mm Male to Male Stereo Audio Cable (4 Feet) 1.2 Meters- Supports iPhone, iPod, Android and other Smartphones
Offered by BlueRigger LLC
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for the job., 13 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent quality. Allows me to connect my iphone to the aux-in 3.5mm female socket (or whatever the correct terminology is) and, importantly, does so without my having to remove the iphone from its case. Perfect.


Black Top Flip Case For Apple Iphone 4 4S Case Includes Screen Protector, Supergets Screen Wiper , Stylus And Polishing Cloth
Black Top Flip Case For Apple Iphone 4 4S Case Includes Screen Protector, Supergets Screen Wiper , Stylus And Polishing Cloth
Offered by MOBILEJOY
Price: £3.39

4.0 out of 5 stars Generally a good buy, 25 Jan. 2013
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This item was a pretty good buy. As with most of my Amazon experiences the postal side of things was pretty efficient, with the case arriving in good time. And the fit was pretty snug, the flip top very nice (the magnetic fastener is an excellent feature), and the overall feel really nice. So, why the 4 star review only? Well, I also bought a more heavyweight case for circumstances when I might need something a bit more robust, and when removing my iphone I managed to crack the case near to the camera lens hole. Ok, this could have been my own clumsiness, but the break looks like a weakness in the plastic. That said, the case would still function I think, and for the price paid I can't really complain too much. So, overall, a very nice buy!


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent product, 25 Jan. 2013
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Buying a charger appears to be a bit of a fraught affair, with some slightly, err, dodgy stuff out there. This bit of kit, however, seems pretty kosher to me, and certainly charges as well as my original charger. It arrived in good time, and now lives in my office, so I can charge up at work if necessary. Overall, I'm very happy with the purchase.


Danielle Milano Men's Large Framed Top Zip Toiletry Bag
Danielle Milano Men's Large Framed Top Zip Toiletry Bag
Price: £11.50

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good product, 26 Oct. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Overall I'm very pleased (so far) with this purchase. It's about the same size as the one it replaced (which I'd used from 2000-2012, but the side pocket of which had long ago burst through into the main compartment), perhaps a little more capacious. The frame supporting the zip area is a nice feature (the top spreads nicely, allowing easy access), and the little "holders", which I originally thought were pockets, but in fact are just straps for securing upright relatively large items like small plastic bottles, are useful. Only time will tell how long it lasts, but a good start.


Shieldwall
Shieldwall
by Justin Hill
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good read, 20 July 2012
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This review is from: Shieldwall (Paperback)
I've read nothing else of Justin Hill's so I can't compare it to his other work, but I thought the book was very good indeed. The obvious comparison for me was with Bernard Cornwell's Anglo-Saxon books, and Hill's effort stands it ground (and then edges forward banging its sword on the rim of its shield :-) ). Hill's style is a bit different. Whereas Cornwell's description is all from the point of view of the fictional Uhtred, Hill's narrative wanders more in tone and in speed, with, occasionally, years being condensed into a glib sentence. His main protagonist is the very real Godwin Wulfnothson, father of King Harald. But he scores when it comes to the details of Anglo-Saxon life, which Cornwell tends not to linger on as much. True, the prose doesn't have quite the punch that Cornwell at his best has, but it's not too far behind.

The main interest for me was the history of an era I knew little about before I read this book (of course, one always has to be careful in getting one's history from a historical novel, but I'll trust Hill until and unless I learn otherwise). The life of Edmund Ironside is fleshed out, no doubt mostly with fiction as I don't suppose there can be that much fact known, but it's a wonderful (and tragic) story...one wonders just how much difference there might have been had Edmund won. I hope I haven't ruined the story for anyone by saying this, by the way; I knew the bones of it before reading the novel, and the blurb on the back-cover also hints at the outcome, so I think it's not a surprise. One irritation, by the way, was that the "translation" list for Anglo-Saxon place names was incomplete; I can't remember Cornwell committing that kind of faux pas.

Overall, however, well worth the money, and an enjoyable few evenings ploughing through it.


The Burning Land (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 5)
The Burning Land (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 5)
Price: £5.35

4.0 out of 5 stars Satisfying...but with small flaws, 13 July 2012
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I'm an avid follower of Cornwell's alternative Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (i.e. the Uhtred Chronicles), and I've re-read the full set on a number of occasions now. They stand up very well to that by the way, but this book, as with all of them after "The Pale Horseman" in my view, lacks a little of the gripping prose and the first two books. I tend to agree with other reviewers in that I think Cornwell loses some interest after a while, and although he delivers in terms of a well researched book (as he almost always does) this apparent lack of interest shows through in small details, like Steapa's character, who from being extremely slow and barely able to put a sentence together in the first books is now, by this book, positively erudite. There is a similar drift in a few other characters, although not to the extent of Steapa's, and I put that down to Cornwell's going through the motions a bit.

That said, it's definitely worth buying. It's still a very good yarn, and I was caught up in it just as I always am (I do disagree with other reviewers who think that the storylines aren't too convincing later on--they're all good in my opinion, this one included). I also think his characterisation is pretty good--I have a very clear picture in my mind's eye of Uhtred himself, and Alfred and other main protagonists are well sketched in my view. That said, this is a historical novel and, in essence, escapism, so don't expect high powered, "challenging" literature.

In summary: It's a very satisfying read and another excellent instalment in the series.


Organic Gardening: The Natural No-dig Way
Organic Gardening: The Natural No-dig Way
by Charles Dowding
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth buying, 26 Jun. 2012
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In my earlier review of Dowding's book on winter vegetables I was more disparaging of this book than I now think is justified. I've warmed to it, and found much useful information in it. The part about the no-dig method, in particular Dowding's experiments to test its efficacy, are admirable, and a really good read to boot. In fact, chapters 1-7 comprise a really good introduction to gardening in general and the no-dig method in particular.

Part 2, in which the various vegetables, herbs and fruit are listed, is actually a reference book, and, again, contains and awful lot of useful information. I was initially irritated by the jump from the discursive Part 1 (chapters 1-8) and this latter part, but if you treat it as what it is then it makes perfect sense to have it here. I also applaud Dowding's appendix (err...not his actual appendix! I'll get me coat....), and the table on page 29 (when to sow etc) is very useful.

Still...some aspects remain irritating: The recipes (why bother? I've yet to see a gardening book that's also a good cookery book, and vice versa for that matter, and this is no different); the reference section is useful, but as a practical gardening reference not a patch on Hessayon's classic "Vegetable and Herb Expert", which I'd still recommend to anyone; and then there's Chapter 8: "The Moon". Ok, it's only a few pages in length, but after a wholly admirable and rational argument in favour of the no-dig method, backed up by his own tests, we get this hocus pocus, with references to astrology (for crying out loud!). Come one Mr Dowding! You can do better than this! If you think there's something there please make a rational argument to this effect. Ok..rant over. :-)

Overall though, a worthwhile buy. I differ from most reviewers though in that I do think it has flaws.


The Imagined Village
The Imagined Village
Price: £9.71

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars So so, 24 May 2012
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This review is from: The Imagined Village (Audio CD)
An "interesting" album. It has its high points ("Cold Hailey Rainy Night" is truly outstanding) and other tracks are ok, but it drops more clangers (the truly awful retelling of Tam Lyn by Benjamin Zepheniah....come on, his "poetry"'s bad enough; letting him loose on a classic folk song is asking for trouble) than it scores hits. I've never been much of a fan of Billy Bragg, even when he was relatively young and trendy, and he remains a better live act and songwriter than a performer of songs, where his vocal limitations are painfully apparent. Ditto Paul Weller post The Jam. But, it *is* an interesting experiment, and I'm glad to have heard most of it. It's not good enough to make me want to buy subsequent efforts, however. So, a pat on the back, but now run along....


Botany for Gardeners
Botany for Gardeners
by Brian Capon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent purchase, 26 April 2012
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This review is from: Botany for Gardeners (Paperback)
I read this book from cover to cover not long after it arrived. I found it interesting, well written and very informative. For someone with no formal botany background it dealt very well with the basics of how plants grow and (admirably) also with basic genetics. Particularly astounding were the photographs of cell division, which made the diagrams themselves more believable (not that I wouldn't have believed them without the photos, but it was just very interesting to see the photographs, if you will, faithfully reproduce the essence of the diagrams). I fully recommended this book to anyone who, like me, is interested in acquiring knowledge of botany and doesn't know where to start. The only very slightly irritating thing was the North American slant, such that plants were rarely (if ever) our own...but that's really a very small quibble. Highly recommended!


How to Grow Winter Vegetables
How to Grow Winter Vegetables
by Charles Dowding
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, but flawed, 30 Mar. 2012
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Overall, I've been impressed by this book. Not only does it address a topic, winter growing, that isn't dealt with elsewhere, but the author also includes an impressive amount of information in only 232 pages. I'm fairly new to vegetable gardening generally, so it could be that others have covered some aspects of this, but the only other books I've come across are the classic one by Hessayon (The Vegetable and Herb Expert), Harrison's "Vegetable Growing: Month by Month", Hills' classic but quirky "Month by Month Organic Gardening", and Dowding's other book "Organic Gardening"; none of these seem to deal with growing over Winter. That said, having followed Dowding's advice what I mainly found was that not much does grow over Winter, but I did learn quite a bit trying things I read in his book, and I remain intrigued by the notion. The key issue, as far as I can see, is overwintering, namely the planting of crops that can *survive* Winter and then have a head start. His advice for many vegetables was sound, and I'm now seeing quite a bit of growth. Of course, overwintering cabbages is nothing new and could be found in many other books, but many of the other crops don't appear to be dealt with elsewhere. The flaw? Well, it's poorly laid out and so it's difficult to find the info you're looking for. For instance, if I wanted to know about growing cabbage I can look in the index and will find "cabbage, growing", and then find references thereto on pages 23, 54, 102-103, 109, 115, 126-127 & 142. They're all legitimate, useful references, and I applaud the thoroughness of the referencing, but surely a further level of sub-referencing is called for?! Most of the reasons for the plethora of page numbers is due to starting planting in different months (very helpful, by the way!), so just have different index entries!: e.g., "growing, june", "growing, july" etc. It's not beyond the wit of man.... (A smaller gripe is the title of Chapter 15 (An Amazing Array of Vegetables). How on Earth is this informative? That said, overall, the positives heavily outweigh the negatives and a second edition with these issues addressed would be a classic in my view. The most impressive aspect is the amount of info he gets in there. It's also much more impressive than Dowding's "Organic Gardening", which I wasn't too keen on.


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