Profile for Copycreate > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Copycreate
Top Reviewer Ranking: 43,804
Helpful Votes: 252

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Copycreate (UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
pixel
Faber and Faber: Eighty Years of Book Cover Design
Faber and Faber: Eighty Years of Book Cover Design
by Joseph Connolly
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.00

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Porn for book lovers, 3 Nov. 2010
I love book covers almost as much as I love reading and would happily spend hours just looking at cover art, or even just the shelves of my own books. Therefore, this book is pretty much perfect for me and it may be that I approach it with a slight element of bias. That said, anyone who enjoys books, art, or even better, both will surely enjoy leafing through the best covers produced during eighty years of Faber and Faber publishing.

Designed to form part of the eightieth anniversary of Faber and Faber (in 2009), the book is a collection of the best cover designs, a tribute to the best of book art. It is put together by Joseph Connolly, who seems to be the perfect man for the job. A self confessed book junkie who claims to have begun collecting books before he even left school, Connolly had published non fiction books when, at last, he wrote what he always wanted to write - a novel. That Faber and Faber offered to publish it was a source of much delight. So much delight that he accepted their bid despite the presence of higher ones. It seems to have paid off on both sides as Connolly is now a prolific novelist but the love affair has obviously continued and that passion shines throughout this wonderful book.


Wife in the North
Wife in the North
by Judith O'Reilly
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars funny, well written... at times so sad, 2 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Wife in the North (Paperback)
I came across this book via the Wife in the North blog so knew what type of thing to expect - tales of family chaos, running out of petrol (again and again!), regularly being ridiculed at the hands of one's children etc. etc.

Judith O'Reilly upped sticks and left London for Northumberland, in short to indulge her husband's dream. The fact that that same husband then proceeds to spend most of his time working away in ... London adds to the backdrop of chaos and keeps O'Reilly oscillating between loving and hating her new life, undecided on whether or not it is for keeps.

Most mothers, especially any that feel they have swapped a high achieving career for something slightly less stellar will find things to identify with here. O'Reilly writes with a razor sharp wit and, at times, profound emotion. The parts in which she talks about her stillborn baby or postnatal depression literally brought tears to my eyes and it such emotion that prevents this book becoming just another collection of inane blog posts.

That said, the inane posts about sick or poo or the school run are done with such expert humour and with a writing style far superior to that found on many blogs that I'd have read those alone anyway. You can read this book incredibly quickly but might end up wishing it had lasted a little longer, offered a slightly longer diversion and break from all those grown up books you know you should really be reading.


But Inside I'm Screaming
But Inside I'm Screaming
by Elizabeth Flock
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Evocative tale of depression, 2 Nov. 2010
Isabel is a high flying, high achieving news reporter... until she falls apart on live TV and suffers a complete and utter breakdown that leaves her desperate and suicidal. The book tells the story of her time in a mental hospital and her gradual path towards recovery.

On one level this book is incredibly easy to read, the style of writing for example is very accessible. On another level, however, the emotion within it, the pain of Isabel's inner torment, perfectionism, troubled past and difficult relationships are very hard to read about. The reasons for her breakdown unfold gradually and drift in and out in a way that mirrors her troubled mind.

As someone who has some experience of mental illness there was so much that resonated, so much that was given clarity through Isabel's experience. Some people have criticised the book's slow pace or lack of twists. I suppose that is fair criticism in the sense that there are very few twists and turns in the plot. Instead, we are allowed to delve deeper and deeper into the twists of Isabel's mind. If you like novels that make you think, challenge your own emotion and focus more on thought and emotion than specific events and plot then this might be for you. If you prefer action packed, fast paced adventures then you should probably find another book to read instead.


Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? (Picture Puffin)
Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? (Picture Puffin)
by Bill Martin Jr.
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars My daughter could 'read' this before she spoke, 22 Oct. 2010
A friend bought this book for my son a few years ago and he loved it. We read it loads and I relied on it to teach him his colours / animal names in a fun way. It is my daughter though who is completely besotted with it. She is transfixed by the rhythmic repetition, 'brown bear, brown bear, what do you see?' which is repeated again and again with all the different animals. She could honestly 'read' this book in just the same style as me before she could say anything more than 'mama' or 'dada'. The pictures are great too, by Eric Carle who wrote 'The Hungry Caterpillar'. A fantastic book that combines fun and education that is guaranteed to become a favourite.


Baby's Very First Book:Faces
Baby's Very First Book:Faces
by John Fordham
Edition: Rag Book
Price: £4.79

5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic, 19 Oct. 2010
When I had my first baby I drew out loads of black and white images on cards for him to look at and he loved them. When no.2 came along time was a little bit more precious so we bought this instead and she absolutely loves it. Fanastic as a first book for newborns that you can prop up on a mat next to them - soft so that it won't hurt them if it falls over. It really seems to hold attention and keep them entertained. Would make a great gift for a newborn.


Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life
Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life
by Winifred Gallagher
Edition: Hardcover

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Concentrate... it will be worth it, 19 Oct. 2010
Winifred Gallagher was already a behavioural science writer but the motivation for this book was more personal. A battle with cancer made her realise how important it was to focus on the here and now, how by choosing what she focused on (and didn't focus on) allowed her to control her life - to the point of making it serene.

That sparked her research into attention, ways of controlloing it, how what we focus on can afffect our work and motivation, our relationships and our children. She looks at what attention really is, and what it means to 'pay attention' as well as covering disordered attention - i.e. ADD. Gallagher offers some thoughts on how to live a more focused life that range from the straightforward tip to spend 30 minutes a day immersed is some activity you really enjoy to the more spiritual and a discussion of the methods of Eckhart Tolle.

This book is very accessible to the lay reader yet clearly backed up by meticulous research. There are passages that really make you stop and take personal responsibility, such as "Your life - who you are, what you think, feel, and do, what you love - is the sum of what you focus on". It's a wake up call to remember you hold the key to your own destiny, that (more than one thinks) attention can be directed in the right way, so as to improve decision making, motivation etc. etc.


LEGO® Star Wars The Visual Dictionary (Dk)
LEGO® Star Wars The Visual Dictionary (Dk)
by Dk
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Has held my son's attention for almost a year, 19 Oct. 2010
I bought this for my son last Christmas. I've just come back to it on here to see if it suggested any similar titles for this year. There are probably two distinct audiences for this book - adult experts and children. My son is 5 and his obsession with Star Wars is matched only by his obsession with Lego. Suffice to say this book hit the mark. He has read it alone in bed after his stories virtually every night for what is coming up to a year and can practically recite the order with his eyes shut. The book is nicely done and has just the right level of detail (for an attentive and knowledgeable child, I can't speak on behalf of the real experts).


Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin
Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin
by Norah Vincent
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars sometimes difficult to read, but very thought provoking, 19 Oct. 2010
I found it really hard to rate this book as there were things I liked and things I really didn't.

The premise of the book is that Vincent goes undercover into 3 different types of mental institution. They're all American which blurs the definitions a bit for a UK reader, but basically the equivalent of NHS, private and alternative health. She gets in by 'faking' symptons but really that's not always required because Vincent has her own mental health issues and has previously been in the 'bin' for real.

The book is as much a consideration of her own condition and what she should do about it as a critique of the system. She offers many views on the quality and style of care but ultimately there are so many different types of mental illness that it is impossible to make a one size fits all judgment on how they should be treated.

Therefore, Vincent concentrates most on what should be done about people like her, and the other similar people she encounters, who she believes might be over-medicated, over-treated perhaps. There is a lot of introspection and at times it is hard to read without judging her self-obsessed. Actually, I think I found it difficult because I recognised some of the same introspection in myself when depressed - that's part of the illness - it's just not always nice to have it reflected back at you in such navel gazing.

The book is useful for those wanting something to make them think about the various triggers for mental illness and the role of medication, it is useful, too, for people who want to understand a bit more about what depression is like. It is not an objective review of treatment options or procedures.

The biggest thing this book can do is make people think.


The Accidental Billionaires: Sex, Money, Betrayal and the Founding of Facebook
The Accidental Billionaires: Sex, Money, Betrayal and the Founding of Facebook
by Ben Mezrich
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars easy to read summary of how facebook came about, 19 Oct. 2010
Ben Mezrich's trade is writing about inaccessible subjects with such as easy reading style that his books become page turners. This one covers the founding of facebook, right from its conception in a Harvard dorm and the debate surrounding whether or not Mark Zuckerburg stole the idea from some classmates.

The book is not as good as some of Mezrich's others mainly because Mark Zuckerburg refused to contribute to the book. In 'Rigged', for example, or 'Bringing Down The House' you get far more of a sense of forbidden information because Mezrich is collaborating with a real insider. I'd recommend those books as better entertainment and they also have a better quality of information behind them, but if you're specifically interested in facebook then this book will still serve you well and give a good background overview - but take it with a little pinch of salt, you never really know what's true here and what's just good storytelling.


The Fry Chronicles
The Fry Chronicles
by Stephen Fry
Edition: Hardcover

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars classic Fry, 15 Oct. 2010
This review is from: The Fry Chronicles (Hardcover)
I read Moab is my Washpot a few years ago and really enjoyed it. This is just as good in terms of the way Fry writes, the fact that he is so indulgent in his use of words (admitting that he says in 100 what could be said in 10), although the subject matter is slightly less interesting - mainly because a lot of it is devoted to recounting the order of various TV / theatre productions he did.

The best bits are the early bits about his time at Cambridge which are as fascinating for their description of the oddities of Cambridge University as they are for Fry's exploits themselves. It is interesting to read about his early alliances with Hugh Laurie, Emma Thompson etc.

He mentions his bipolar diagnosis only once, I'd perhaps have hoped for a bit more of that, or a bit more candour about his feelings full stop. There is plenty about how much self-loathing he felt, how he was capivated by technology or spending money, but sometimes it feels as if it's only going so deep, and that much is still hidden away.

Listening to the book has the added benefit of Fry's delicious book. In short, not as good as Moab but still classic Fry.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7