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R. Tong (Caerleon, Wales)
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Love And Theft
Love And Theft
Offered by Leisurezone
Price: £5.75

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lone magpie in great voice!, 6 Feb. 2003
This review is from: Love And Theft (Audio CD)
This album is just a gem. Dylan the magpie steals melodies from Old America, Ancient England and Billie Holiday, amongst others, and his new settings manage to both age and update the music in a way that only he can. The albums opener Tweedledum and Tweedledee is fine, and recalls 60s Dylan lyrically and musically but it is actually the album's weakest track. It gives way to Mississipi, which is an instant classic, but the true feel of the album only really emerges with the swinging third track, Summer Days. Dylan has never sounded better. His voice has decayed markedly in the last 25 years and it has only been over the last few years that I feel he has truely learnt how to sing again. He now opens his throat fully and there is little or no sign of the nasal tone to his voice which ruined much of his work of the eighties. There is humour to be found on all 12 tracks and although Dylan is haunted by the same ghosts as when recording Time Out Of Mind, he seems to be able to live with and poke fun at them now. Floater (Too Much To Ask) is the album's best moment. A gorgeous melody, beautiful backing and a great Dylan narration. The album's closer Sugar Baby's melody is lifted from the old traditional song Lonesome Road, made famous by Paul Robeson, and is a perfect continuation of the themes of Time Out Of Mind, and its choruses unsettlingly echo Idiot Wind and You're A Big Girl Now, showing that the pain of his divorce is as as bitter to him now as it has ever been. Very painful but as ever, vital and even uplifting for the listener. This may well be the case for Dylan aswell, who probably has a deep need to get these feelings off his chest. If you don't own this album I strongly suggest you go out and buy it. This really is Dylan at his best.


Love And Theft-Limited Edition
Love And Theft-Limited Edition
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £21.22

5.0 out of 5 stars Lone Magpie in great voice!, 4 Feb. 2003
This album is just a gem. Dylan the magpie steals melodies from Old America, Ancient England and Billie Holiday, amongst others, and his new settings manage to both age and update the music in a way that only he can. The albums opener Tweedledum and Tweedledee is fine, and recalls 60s Dylan lyrically and musically but it is actually the album's weakest track. It gives way to Mississipi, which is an instant classic, but the true feel of the album only really emerges with the swinging third track, Summer Days. Dylan has never sounded better. His voice has decayed markedly in the last 25 years and it has only been over the last few years that I feel he has truely learnt how to sing again. He now opens his throat fully and there is little or no sign of the nasal tone to his voice which ruined much of his work of the eighties. There is humour to be found on all 12 tracks and although Dylan is haunted by the same ghosts as when recording Time Out Of Mind, he seems to be able to live with and poke fun at them now. Floater (Too Much To Ask) is the album's best moment. A gorgeous melody, beautiful backing and a great Dylan narration. The album's closer Sugar Baby's melody is lifted from the old traditional song Lonesome Road, made famous by Paul Robeson, and is a perfect continuation of the themes of Time Out Of Mind, and its choruses unsettlingly echo Idiot Wind and You're A Big Girl Now, showing that the pain of his divorce is as as bitter to him now as it has ever been. Very painful but as ever, vital and even uplifting for the listener. This may well be the case for Dylan aswell, who probably has a deep need to get these feelings off his chest. If you don't own this album I strongly suggest you go out and buy it. This really is Dylan at his best.


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