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Roger McDodger (Beijing)

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Shares Made Simple: A beginner's guide to the stock market (Revised, updated and expanded second edition)
Shares Made Simple: A beginner's guide to the stock market (Revised, updated and expanded second edition)
Price: £10.44

5.0 out of 5 stars good, 18 Feb. 2015
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Good intro, quite a general book but useful to understand some issues good for someone to learn more about it


Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers
Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers
Price: £15.49

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars beginner level, not what I was expecting, 18 Jan. 2015
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I struggled to complete this book because all the concepts are so simple, I can't understand why the book has high ratings. There was nothing new in this book that doesn't exist elsewhere, and I didn't come across anything I didn't already know before.


Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time (Portfolio Non Fiction)
Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time (Portfolio Non Fiction)
Price: £6.99

5.0 out of 5 stars good book covered some nice material and made me think, 1 Jan. 2015
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I enjoyed reading this book it is much more than the title suggests a good thorough book with some great ideas from online to offline and different areas of relationships


Superhuman by Habit: A Guide to Becoming the Best Possible Version of Yourself, One Tiny Habit at a Time
Superhuman by Habit: A Guide to Becoming the Best Possible Version of Yourself, One Tiny Habit at a Time
Price: £3.67

5.0 out of 5 stars short but concise with some good ideas, 16 Dec. 2014
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It had a few good ideas in it and I think it adds more than ten times the cost of the book to my life and I think the effects can be almost immediately. Although it's quite short, simple and I think the author is kind of a normal guy similar to a friend but this is all not necessarily a bad thing.


The Science of Getting Rich
The Science of Getting Rich
Price: £0.71

3.0 out of 5 stars quick read - some good ideas, a bit, 13 Dec. 2014
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Generally it's quite good, quite concise, don't think it presents anything that doesn't exist elsewhere.

Nice way of putting it that if you want to help yourself you should help others, and it's better to be cooperative rather than competitive.

I also think some of this is very subjective, which I disagree with on this school of thought. to say that the study of disease can't help people be healthier is just crazy. There are laws and concrete facts in our universe and however you think you can't change these. You should just learn to use your mind to work around them. This kind of thing was mentioned a few times and it strikes me as kind of delusional. Also he says that readers don't need to read another book on getting rich because everything is included in this as a science. I think some of the things he says could be disputed, and it's surely worth reading more (and more recent) and in greater detail.


Napoleon (TEXT ONLY)
Napoleon (TEXT ONLY)
Price: £4.69

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating account of napoleon, 12 Dec. 2014
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It was a very personal account of napoleons life in a very favourable light but told in a very readable and interesting way that keeps you hooked. It's more about the man and his personal life than his battles and military tactics, and it's a little one sided so it should be read with something else to have a fuller and broader understanding. Great book by Vincent, highly recommended


The SuCupCare
The SuCupCare

5.0 out of 5 stars We have been using this product and it is fantastic, 16 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The SuCupCare (Kitchen & Home)
We have trialled this for a week with one of our most challenging residents. He has successfully managed to use this device with ease. It has improved his independence, reduced occurences of choking and increased the amount of food / liquid consumed".


Overcoming Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Overcoming Books)
Overcoming Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Overcoming Books)
by David Veale
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.68

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very very very very good book, 31 Mar. 2011
This book was very very very very good

I couldn't stop reading it, I think I have read it about 7-8 times and I can't put it down


The Age of Consent
The Age of Consent
by George Monbiot
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Consent, 18 Jan. 2006
This review is from: The Age of Consent (Paperback)
George Monbiot was educated at Stowe School and later Oxford where he read Zoology. As a journalist he spent 7 years travelling around Brazil, East Africa and Indonesia. He is a plucky environmental, political activist leading to him being beaten up by police and security guards on several occasions being imprisoned and also shot at. A revolutionary thinker with a great deal of experience The Age Of Consent is a ‘manifesto’ picturing a world in which George Monbiot sees maximum prosperity.
In The Age of Consent he puts the current democratic world under scrutiny having also written about this on a more detailed level in his earlier book The Captive State and makes the fact that we can even call it democratic questionable, he suggests new systems to unselected world powers such as. WTO, World Bank with real democratic alternatives, and that power should be changed on a worldwide scale so that the worlds power was more equally distributed in terms of population rather than a countries trade or economic position.
He suggests that globalisation should continue but in a different, more fair way. He sees no need for us to be confined within our national border and asks why our sense of community and common interest should rarely go further than the national border. He asks why we do not forget our geographical differences and recognise that if we began to see our similarities and shared interests it would benefit us all. There are a few revolutionary changes he thinks should be done.
Power should be given to people with the creation of a world parliament whereby the world would be divided up in terms of its population and each part elected a representative. These would then meet and discuss world issues. There power would be immense for the sole fact that they would actually be representative of the worlds people and would therefore have huge lobbying weight influencing global institutional and national decisions, and opposing regimes. He estimated the cost to be almost 1 Billion Dollars, but suggested this could be raised from JM Keynes’s idea of an International Clearing Union (ICU) raised at Bretton Woods Conference in 1944. It was accepted by all members except the States, as Monbiot believes, it would have destroyed their dominant trading and economic position taking away the dollar as the international currency for trade.
The ICU would be a global bank replacing the IMF and World Bank whose purpose would be to equalise the power of international trade, reduce the growing disparity between rich and poor countries, prevent the third world ‘debt trap‘ and at the same time raise money for the world parliament. It would monitor worldwide trade where all trade would be done in its own currency, a bancor. Each nation would have an account with a fixed exchange rate and where exports would add bancors and imports would take them away providing an incentive for each country to end up at the end of a year with an account of zero bancors. If a country had bancors left over it would be confiscated to the ICU reserve fund encouraging the country to use up all the bancors by buying from other countries before the end of the year. Countries with an account deficit would have their currency depreciated, encouraging others to buy the next year.
Overall I think this is a well researched book with good ideas, but it does do something much more powerful than the ideas it proposes. It addresses that there are fundamental problems with the global order and gives us groundwork for change. For example why do we sit back and watch food surpluses grow (beef and butter mountains) in rich countries whilst millions starve in poor. It is naïve for us to think that how the world is run now is how it will be run in, even as soon as, a couple of decades. Without proper global democratic systems in place globalisation will further to benefit the rich over the poor.
The question as to why we should stop using democratic systems past the national scale is a very good one in terms of how to create fairer world regulatory systems, I think the one person, one vote World Parliament is a good start, and little more. The problem with representatives of the World Parliament is that they will always be very distant and I think the belief that democracy becomes less and less democratic the more people it represents is true. The system would be strongly weighted to countries of larger populations such as China and India having over 20 seats at the world parliament whereas the whole of Europe would have less than half of that. It seems this unfair weighting would misrepresent the many contrasting views of those smaller countries. A very interesting book I think the subjects will become of increasing relevance.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 26, 2011 6:19 AM GMT


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