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Lj Rm Roberts "welshbabe" (Wales)
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Relax and Rest Meditations
Relax and Rest Meditations
Price: 0.63

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Choice of three meditations, 1 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Relax and Rest Meditations (App)
Found this a good app.
You can choose water sounds or music as the background and then you can do a short breathing meditation, a medium length meditation of a long one - depending on what you feel like.

Mostly just going through the body and relaxing muscles but I quite like this one.


My Chakra Meditation
My Chakra Meditation
Price: 0.00

2.0 out of 5 stars Not a meditation at all really, 1 Feb 2014
This review is from: My Chakra Meditation (App)
I was hoping for a guided meditation but all you get is a different coloured mandala on the screen and some music - a waste of time for me.


Self Healing
Self Healing
Price: 0.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Robotic voice, 1 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Self Healing (App)
The guided meditations in this is not too bad - though short - and each different section is quite good for beginners.

the problem I have is with the robotic voice - it hardly sounds human and does not give the sentences with the right amount of emphasise on the correct words - just as if its being done by computer - most odd and off-putting.

But for free its not too bad.


Rupert Annual 1974
Rupert Annual 1974
by Alex Cubie
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Four long stories but very few puzzles, 1 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Rupert Annual 1974 (Hardcover)
===The Book in Detail===

The book contains four stories:
* Rupert and the Iron Spade - 26 pages.
* Rupert and Jennie Frost - 26 pages.
* Rupert and the Secret Path - 27 pages.
* Rupert and the Little Bells - 26 pages.

The book also has:-
* Rupert Nursery Rhyme Puzzle - 1 page.
* Find Hidden Birds on content's page.
* Origami Yacht - 1 page.
* Page of answers.

===The Annual Itself===

===Rupert and the Iron Spade===
This is a seaside tale with Rupert being taken on holiday to the coast.
There he meets a boy from Nutwood called Peter who lends him his metal spade when he goes back home.
Rupert meets Captain Barnacle who tells him that weird things have been happening - such as loads of seaweed and lots of rough foaming seas.
On the beach Rupert finds that the seaweed is moving and his metal spade finds a large key buried in the sand. Rupert then floats out to sea on a raft of seaweed and ends up being pulled along by a sea serpent .
The moving seaweed turns out to be little seaweed men and the foaming seas turn out to be white horses belonging to Neptune.
The missing key is the one that is used to lock the white horses in a hidden lagoon. The horses are once again back safe and sound and then Rupert gets to ride home on more seaweed.

===Rupert and Jennie Frost===
The story begins with Rupert's house half covered in snow.
It turns out that the shed is half covered in ice too and snow only seems to be in certain places.
Rupert goes off to fetch a sledge but sees a tree covered in long icicles - he goes to have a look and ends up trapped inside the ice curtain.
It is the work of Jennie Frost - Jack Frost's sister. She has been out and about practising. Jennie rescues Rupert and gives him an ice pill so that he won't feel the cold.
Jennie has now lost her little ice whistle.
Gregory Guinea Pig has found the whistle and blows it which creates a storm.
They are whisked up on the wind and end up at King Frost's castle in the snow. Gregory is freezing cold so Rupert gives him the other ice pill. All works out in the end when Jennie gets her whistle back.

===Rupert and the Secret Path===
Bingo, the clever dog, is making a secret path through the woods by laying down a trail of sand. Constable Growler is annoyed as that sand is set aside for 'the Queen's roads' and orders Rupert and Bingo to bring it all back.
Rupert wonders why Bingo is bothering to make a path - and finds out it leads to hidden ruins behind some tall bushes where Bingo has a secret den.
The next day Rupert sees a mystery man lurking around and later finds a scrap of paper which Rupert shows to some Girl Guides.
The Guides wonder whether the map on the paper refers to the strange buildings in Pendragon Woods which are supposed to be 'hush hush'.
It turns out that the man lurking around is a spy and the police are able to catch him thanks to Bingo's secret path.

===Rupert and the Little Bells===
Rupert hears little bells ringing and finds that it is Odmedod - the farmer's scarecrow, who is out and about and not in his shed - he has bells on both his hands.
Odmedod wants to get in touch with Santa as he is upset that lots of children get presents of toy dogs and cats but no-one ever gets a toy scarecrow - 'does nobody love me?' he wonders.
Rupert says he will write and ask Santa for one. Rupert then receives a message to be at the 'upper holly bush'. Here he finds a toy scout sent from Santa. They have received Rupert's letter but unfortunately Santa has no idea what a scarecrow looks like.
So they have to take the scarecrow to Santa - the little helicopter is too small for all of them so Rupert and Odmedod are carried along on long ropes. At Santa's castle Odmedod is measured and pictures are taken of him.
On Christmas Eve Rupert hangs up his stocking - next morning he finds another parcel on the windowsill and is delighted to find a toy scarecrow - just like Odmedod.
Rupert puts the toy scarecrow in the garden but it does not frighten the birds at all. So Odmedod will teach the toy scarecrow how to frighten the birds to stop it being a laughing stock.

===What I Thought===

Well this is the old style smaller annual which is not as big as the current editions.

The cover on this book was the first one done by Alex Cubie and to my mind is not one of the best. The picture seems to lack depth and lacks the charm of many of the other covers.

As usual it is a wrap around image and this time is a snow scene which continues from the front to the back cover. Rupert is shown with his chums and they are making snow 'ducks'.

Cubie has evidently done this design and has signed the back cover. There is attractive holly on the back cover and an image of a the black cat (Dinkie?) on the front - but not a very attractive image and the cat is not in any of the stories anyway.

Inside the covers are double page images known as 'endpapers'.
In this book they are dark and atmospheric and called 'Rupert and the Fishing Haven'. The image is of a fishing village at night with the small boats in the harbour and little light houses. Rupert is shown as a very small image with his pals, Edward Trunk, Algy Pug and Bingo the dog with lanterns and little cottages lit up with steps leading down to the harbour.

The contents page has a colourful illustration of Rupert above ground with with flowers while below ground the Imps are in their tunnels.

The next page has a pretty oval image of Santa with his sleigh and also the little yellow helicopter with Rupert.

The puzzle page shows traditional nursery rhyme characters like Humpty, King Cole, Jack Horner, Boy Blue, Bo-Peep and a cat

The origami in this annual is on one full page but is a simple six fold pattern to make a yacht - which is odd as often the pattern makes something that is related to one of the stories - but not this time.

The answer page also has an attractive image of Rupert and his pals skating.

This book seems quite small in regards to its contents as it contains just four stories and very few puzzles.

Admittedly the stories are all quite long and of the same length.

There is a good mixture of story content - with one being a summer and beach orientated story while two others revolve around Jack Frost and Santa Claus. The fourth story involves secret paths and hidden dens and spies.

The images in the stories are bright and colourful and some are signed by Alfred Bestall.

The stories have the usual cosy happy endings and are, as usual, written at two levels - rhyming couplets or a longer paragraph of text.

Each page has four colour pictures so younger children can follow the story that way while someone else reads the full text to them.

This book does seem slightly disjointed - some images on the cover do not feature in any of the stories, and the same thing happens with the origami item - usually the whole thing is tied together much better.

Also there is a definite lack of puzzles in this issue - no Spot the Difference, Crosswords or Colouring.

However despite if deficiencies I still give this five stars as the stories themselves are long and interesting and it is a worthwhile read.

Children will enjoy the seasonal stories with Jennie Frost and Santa and the hidden path tale is something people can relate to - that is having a secret hideaway and making a hidden path.

The seaside story makes reference to white horses being the same as surf on rough waves and the fact that the horses get locked up by Neptune every so often is an amusing idea.


RUPERT 1974 1st edition.
RUPERT 1974 1st edition.
by THE DAILY EXPRESS
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Some long stories but very few puzzles, 1 Jan 2014
===The Book in Detail===

The book contains four stories:
* Rupert and the Iron Spade - 26 pages.
* Rupert and Jennie Frost - 26 pages.
* Rupert and the Secret Path - 27 pages.
* Rupert and the Little Bells - 26 pages.

The book also has:-
* Rupert Nursery Rhyme Puzzle - 1 page.
* Find Hidden Birds on content's page.
* Origami Yacht - 1 page.
* Page of answers.

===The Annual Itself===

===Rupert and the Iron Spade===
This is a seaside tale with Rupert being taken on holiday to the coast.
There he meets a boy from Nutwood called Peter who lends him his metal spade when he goes back home.
Rupert meets Captain Barnacle who tells him that weird things have been happening - such as loads of seaweed and lots of rough foaming seas.
On the beach Rupert finds that the seaweed is moving and his metal spade finds a large key buried in the sand. Rupert then floats out to sea on a raft of seaweed and ends up being pulled along by a sea serpent .
The moving seaweed turns out to be little seaweed men and the foaming seas turn out to be white horses belonging to Neptune.
The missing key is the one that is used to lock the white horses in a hidden lagoon. The horses are once again back safe and sound and then Rupert gets to ride home on more seaweed.

===Rupert and Jennie Frost===
The story begins with Rupert's house half covered in snow.
It turns out that the shed is half covered in ice too and snow only seems to be in certain places.
Rupert goes off to fetch a sledge but sees a tree covered in long icicles - he goes to have a look and ends up trapped inside the ice curtain.
It is the work of Jennie Frost - Jack Frost's sister. She has been out and about practising. Jennie rescues Rupert and gives him an ice pill so that he won't feel the cold.
Jennie has now lost her little ice whistle.
Gregory Guinea Pig has found the whistle and blows it which creates a storm.
They are whisked up on the wind and end up at King Frost's castle in the snow. Gregory is freezing cold so Rupert gives him the other ice pill. All works out in the end when Jennie gets her whistle back.

===Rupert and the Secret Path===
Bingo, the clever dog, is making a secret path through the woods by laying down a trail of sand. Constable Growler is annoyed as that sand is set aside for 'the Queen's roads' and orders Rupert and Bingo to bring it all back.
Rupert wonders why Bingo is bothering to make a path - and finds out it leads to hidden ruins behind some tall bushes where Bingo has a secret den.
The next day Rupert sees a mystery man lurking around and later finds a scrap of paper which Rupert shows to some Girl Guides.
The Guides wonder whether the map on the paper refers to the strange buildings in Pendragon Woods which are supposed to be 'hush hush'.
It turns out that the man lurking around is a spy and the police are able to catch him thanks to Bingo's secret path.

===Rupert and the Little Bells===
Rupert hears little bells ringing and finds that it is Odmedod - the farmer's scarecrow, who is out and about and not in his shed - he has bells on both his hands.
Odmedod wants to get in touch with Santa as he is upset that lots of children get presents of toy dogs and cats but no-one ever gets a toy scarecrow - 'does nobody love me?' he wonders.
Rupert says he will write and ask Santa for one. Rupert then receives a message to be at the 'upper holly bush'. Here he finds a toy scout sent from Santa. They have received Rupert's letter but unfortunately Santa has no idea what a scarecrow looks like.
So they have to take the scarecrow to Santa - the little helicopter is too small for all of them so Rupert and Odmedod are carried along on long ropes. At Santa's castle Odmedod is measured and pictures are taken of him.
On Christmas Eve Rupert hangs up his stocking - next morning he finds another parcel on the windowsill and is delighted to find a toy scarecrow - just like Odmedod.
Rupert puts the toy scarecrow in the garden but it does not frighten the birds at all. So Odmedod will teach the toy scarecrow how to frighten the birds to stop it being a laughing stock.

===What I Thought===

Well this is the old style smaller annual which is not as big as the current editions.

The cover on this book was the first one done by Alex Cubie and to my mind is not one of the best. The picture seems to lack depth and lacks the charm of many of the other covers.

As usual it is a wrap around image and this time is a snow scene which continues from the front to the back cover. Rupert is shown with his chums and they are making snow 'ducks'.

Cubie has evidently done this design and has signed the back cover. There is attractive holly on the back cover and an image of a the black cat (Dinkie?) on the front - but not a very attractive image and the cat is not in any of the stories anyway.

Inside the covers are double page images known as 'endpapers'.
In this book they are dark and atmospheric and called 'Rupert and the Fishing Haven'. The image is of a fishing village at night with the small boats in the harbour and little light houses. Rupert is shown as a very small image with his pals, Edward Trunk, Algy Pug and Bingo the dog with lanterns and little cottages lit up with steps leading down to the harbour.

The contents page has a colourful illustration of Rupert above ground with with flowers while below ground the Imps are in their tunnels.

The next page has a pretty oval image of Santa with his sleigh and also the little yellow helicopter with Rupert.

The puzzle page shows traditional nursery rhyme characters like Humpty, King Cole, Jack Horner, Boy Blue, Bo-Peep and a cat

The origami in this annual is on one full page but is a simple six fold pattern to make a yacht - which is odd as often the pattern makes something that is related to one of the stories - but not this time.

The answer page also has an attractive image of Rupert and his pals skating.

This book seems quite small in regards to its contents as it contains just four stories and very few puzzles.

Admittedly the stories are all quite long and of the same length.

There is a good mixture of story content - with one being a summer and beach orientated story while two others revolve around Jack Frost and Santa Claus. The fourth story involves secret paths and hidden dens and spies.

The images in the stories are bright and colourful and some are signed by Alfred Bestall.

The stories have the usual cosy happy endings and are, as usual, written at two levels - rhyming couplets or a longer paragraph of text.

Each page has four colour pictures so younger children can follow the story that way while someone else reads the full text to them.

This book does seem slightly disjointed - some images on the cover do not feature in any of the stories, and the same thing happens with the origami item - usually the whole thing is tied together much better.

Also there is a definite lack of puzzles in this issue - no Spot the Difference, Crosswords or Colouring.

However despite if deficiencies I still give this five stars as the stories themselves are long and interesting and it is a worthwhile read.

Children will enjoy the seasonal stories with Jennie Frost and Santa and the hidden path tale is something people can relate to - that is having a secret hideaway and making a hidden path.

The seaside story makes reference to white horses being the same as surf on rough waves and the fact that the horses get locked up by Neptune every so often is an amusing idea.


RUPERT ANNUAL 2001
RUPERT ANNUAL 2001
by Ian. Illustrated by John Harrold. Robinson
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Six stories and loads of puzzles - a great read., 7 Nov 2013
This review is from: RUPERT ANNUAL 2001 (Hardcover)
===The Book===

Hard cover annual.
Number 66 and published in 2001.
Published by Pedigree - an 'Express Annual'.
ASIN: B0012GQE1U
Stories by Ian Robinson.
Illustrations by John Harrold.
Story Colouring by Gina Hart.
Copyright Express Newspapers 2001.

===The Book in Detail===

The book contains six stories:
* Rupert and the Coronation - 19 pages.
* Rupert and the Seaweed - 15 pages.
* Rupert's Birthday Adventure - 16 pages.
* Rupert and the Pearl Fishers - 21 pages.
* Rupert and the Nut Hatch - 10 pages.
* Rupert and the Christmas Box - 15 pages.

The book also has:-
Rupert's Fun Pages which include:
* Page of crossword
* Page of colouring (2 pictures)
* Page of Spot the Difference.
* Page of 'Whose Hat' - 16 images to find in the stories - full page.
* Page of answers.

===The Annual Itself===

===Rupert and the Coronation===

Rupert and Otterline go exploring in the woods and while following birds they get lost. They then find a path and see an old style rider on a horse. He says he will take them home and they ride on the horse with him. But they are taken to a castle where Otterline is called Princess. Guards take Rupert to sleep in the stables. Otterline in then locked in a room - and from behind the curtain emerges the real Princess - who looks just like her. The Chamberlain is determined she shall not be crowned Queen.
Meanwhile a cat shows Rupert a hole in the wall outside that takes him to the garden Underneath the princesses window. Rupert climbs a tree and with the aid of sheets the real Princess escapes with Rupert, leaving Otterline behind.
The Chamberlain states to tell the visiting crowds that the Princess is ill and he will take her place - but Ruper arrives wit the Princess and she is crowned. Otterline is rescued and she and Rupert are sent home in style in a magnificent coach.

===Rupert and the Seaweed===

Rupert and his friend Bill are on holiday at Rocky Bay, but the beach s spoilt by being covered in blue seaweed. They go over the rocks and spot what they believe to be a group of children - all wearing striped swimsuits and pointed shell hats and they are trying to clean the beach - but to no avail. There is even more seaweed in and under the water. Rupert looks up the seaweed in his reference book and it is supposed to come from the South Seas and is the food of the pink nibble fish. A transparent globe arrives in the water to take Rupert and Bill underwater to see Neptune - it is being pushed along by a dolphin. Rupert and Bill get sent to the South Seas on a large white horse called Hippocampus. When they arrive they find a large sea serpent who find a shoal of the pink nibbler fish to go back with Rupert and eat all the seaweed. By the next day the beach and sea are back to normal.

===Rupert's Birthday Adventure===

It is Autumn and nearly time for Rupert's Birthday (that is new information for me!). Rupert is writing invitations to his party and whn going to post he meets Bill and his cousin Beatrix who is only 3 years old. In the party they play treasure hunt in the garden - when a balloonist lands and gives Rupert the gift of a flying helmet. Rupert is to go for a balloon ride over Nutwood, but Beatrix wants to go too. They climb into the basket but Bea fiddles with the controls and they take off without the balloonist. They climb high and travel far, getting cold. Finally Rupert gets the controls to work but has no idea where they are. Suddenly they see another balloon, then another - and then dozens. Stork birds appear to tell them they are in the lead of the race. They land at the Bird King's palace and find they have won first prize. They all get taken back home by the balloonist's brother in time for Birthday cake.

===Rupert and the Pearl Fishers===

Rupert goes to fly a kite with Pong Ping but Pong has just had an urgent message to go to China. They use his special lift which goes underground and which turns direction half way (of course!!). Th Emperor has vanished - kidnapped in a boat. The ransom is the Emperor's weight in black pearls. They speed to the island where the black pearls are found. Eventually the Emperor is rescued and Rupert has a string of pearls as a gift for his mother.

===Rupert and the Nut Hatch===

.Rupert and Bill Badger are out looking for conkers. Gaffer is also out looking for sweet chestnuts. Horace the hedgehog is nearly ready to hibernate but is out searching too. They find two Nutwood Elves with a sort of cleaner hoovering up the conkers - they have baskets on their backs which they are emptying down a secret shoot in a tree trunk. Rupert and Bill go over secretly to look and fall down the shoot - landing on a pile of conkers. The Elves are using the conkers in their arboretum - a tree nursery - they have a special growing mixture which makes them grow quickly. The Elves realise they have been collecting too many conkers so they give a basket of sweet ones for the Gaffer and another for Rupert to share with his pals.

===Rupert and the Christmas Box===

Christmas has gone and Rupert plays football on the common. When he goes home he finds an unopened present under the tree which no-one seems to know anything about. Mr Bear opens the box but it is completely empty. - just a wooden box.
Bill Badger visits and says it looks just like a Jack in the Box - and when the box is opened - it IS a Jack in the Box. When Podgy Pig arrives he thinks the box looks like its full of toffees and when it is opened out spills piles of colourfully wrapped sweets. Bill thinks it must be a wishing box and Rupert says he wants to go sledging so needs snow - opens the box and there is immediately a blizzard pouring out of the box - Mrs Bear is horrified and tells Rupert to 'do something!'. Rupert runs out with the box and leaves in on the common on a large stone - but the snow is still pouring out. Next morning the whole of Nutwood is covered in snow. The chums all play in the snow on the common but Rupert finds the magic box gone. They follow a trail of footprints to Farmer Brown's hut. Inside is the sound of groaning - the two fox brothers have been eating piles of Christmas chocolates that they magicked up. Rupert takes the box home - 'NOT IN HERE' says Mrs Bear! So the box is to be put in the garden shed away from the house. Mrs Bear then says 'I wish we knew who the owner was?'. There is a puff and the Sage of Um appears - he has been stuck inside the box for a week after a spell went wrong. The Sage then says he wants to give them their Christmas gifts so Rupert pulls out a pair of skies and Mrs Bear removes some mittens.

===What I Thought===

This has a hard glossy cover and has an interesting image of Rupert and little Beatrix Badger riding on a swimming white horse.with fish, merboys and hot air balloons. The image as usual wraps around to the back of the annual and this shows Algy Pug on a rock with a dragon.
The endpapers are the same at the front and back of the book and are executed by John Harrold. The image is a lovely muted scene of a hedge bank with a little house set into the earth and with a family of little fairies with flying babies which they are bathing in an old bathtub outside. Rupert, Bill and Bea are looking on and peeping at the scene. This is a beautiful image and evokes a magical scene where you can just imagine Rupert's joy at finding this tiny family of minute figures all living in a hedge bank and going about their daily business.
The book has six stories which is a good content and the images are colourful and add depth to the stories - meaning even young children can follow them by just looking at the pictures if they wish.
I always like to see a Christmas story of some sort included so it was good to see the Christmas Box one.
I have always like the puzzles and colourings as much as the stories and they are really an integral part of the annual. The Spot the Difference is always a good puzzle and has colourful images covering a whole page. The colouring is also two pictures to a full page and again a full page crossword. The 'Hats' puzzle is a nice change and means you can go back over the stories with the child looking for the 16 different hats - a good puzzle and memory game to recall where you saw them.

===Its good points===

* 6 stories
* Colourful and cute cover.
* Beautiful endpages.
* Good selection of puzzles
* Christmas story
* Attractive colourful images
* Interesting puzzle of finding hats in stories.


Rupert Annual: No. 61
Rupert Annual: No. 61
by I. Robinson
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars 5 great stories and lots of puzzles, 5 Nov 2013
This review is from: Rupert Annual: No. 61 (Hardcover)
===The Book===

Hard cover annual.
Number 61 and published in 1996.
Published by Pedigree - an 'Express Annual'.
ISBN - 978-1874507604
Stories by Ian Robinson.
Illustrations by John Harrold.
Story Colouring by Gina Hart.

===The Book in Detail===

The book contains six stories:
* Rupert and the Dragon Dance - 21 pages.
* Rupert and the Lost Sheep - 16 pages.
* Rupert and the Pirates - 24 pages.
* Rupert and the Mail Train - 12 pages.
* Rupert and the Deep Freeze - 19 pages.

The book also has:-
Rupert's Fun Pages which include:
Spot the Difference
Who Am I page
Paint your own picture page
Rupert's Crossword
Find Treature page
What Does it Say? code page
Whose Hat? 16 pictures to identify.
Redirected Post puzzle.
Page of two pictures to colour
Page of Answers and 'The Followers of Rupert' page.

===The Annual Itself===

===Rupert and the Dragon Dance===

Rupert meets Pong Ping, his Chinese friend, who is buying candles to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Rupert is told that they celebrate with fireworks, feasting and dragons, and he suggests they have their own celebrations in Nutwood.

The pals make a large dragon to do the dragon dance and Rupert leads in a purple Chinese costume. Pong Ping then gets invited to China and Rupert joins him. When they arrive all the dragons have disappeared and the Emperor is so upset he has taken to his bed.

Rupert and Pong Ping do the Dragon Dance and hear a piper - they follow him to a cave where they are trapped - being thought of as a proper dragon. They are taken to the city beyond the far hills - here they find all the other dragons - Rupert manages to escape and they free all the other dragons. They all return to the Emperor and he decides to lock the magic flute away.

===Rupert and the Lost Sheep===

Rupert is having stories read to him out of a Nursery Rhyme book. When he falls asleep he is later awakened to find his bed floating on the sea. He lands on an island and is amazed to see lots of other beds abandoned on the beach. Rupert then sees a pile of sheep, and a sign marked 'Arrivals'. There is a train with children on and there is one seat left for Rupert. The land is magical and the flowers have smiling faces, as do the tree trunks. The train winds its way into Sleepy Mountain and then they come to a bridge where they alight and are then guided by individual smiling stars. Rupert gets hit on the head by a rattle - there are babies in cradles on the top of some trees - with their own nursemaid.

Rupert continues to follow the sound of voices and comes to a castle - there is a party in the garden with lots of children in their night clothes, plus nursery rhyme characters. Poor Bo-Peep is crying as she has lost her sheep and Rupert says he knows where to find them. They find the sheep in the meadow and the cows in the corn, and Little Boy Blue asleep. Bo-Peep takes the sheep back to the castle where they are needed for the King to count them to get to sleep. Rupert dozes off as well and in the morning he awakens in his own bed - thinking it was all a dream. But what is that in his pyjama pocket? a railway ticket form the little train ride!

===Rupert and the Pirates===

Rupert goes on holiday to Rocky Bay with his friend Bill Badger.

There is to be a Pirate's Pageant and the pair dress up and play pirates. While playing on the beach they find a bottle with a message in it - 'HELP - Mutiny about the Gold Doubloon' and on the reverse is a sketch map with 'X' marks the spot.

They go to Captain Binnacle who tells them there used to be smugglers who were only afraid of King Neptune. He has not heard of the ship's name and thinks it is a joke.

Next day Rupert and Bill make their way through a gap in the rocks to the secluded 'Silversand Bay' which was marked on the map. Here they find footprints which lead into a cave which the pair follow. Inside are pirates with a treasure chest. Rupert hides but they are seen and carried off by the pirates who take them back to a large sailing ship moored in the bay.

On board ship they are locked in a cabin with the captain. The pirate's used his grandfather's map to find the treasure at Silversand Bay.

Rupert manages to climb out of a high window and return to Captain Binnacle and raise the alarm. On deck the pirates are all drunk and asleep.

They row back out to the sailing ship and Rupert climbs aboard and wakes the pirates - who chase him round the deck.
Then Captain Binnacle appears dressed and Neptune and scares the pirates. The captain of the ship is released and they return to the cave where all the gold treasure is stored. They fill the treasure chest with rocks so when the pirates come for the chest and later sail away they do not realise that they do not have the treasure.
Later back at Rocky Bay Rupert and Bill win the Pirate Pageant by wearing the genuine pirate's clothes.

===Rupert and the Mail Train===

Rupert and his mother are going shopping and board the train - she is dressed in a long skirt with a feather in her hat.

They miss their train so board the next one. On the train they find a sleeping postman. Mrs Bear gets worried as she can then see they are travelling on the wrong line.

This is a Mail Train and only stops at Postal HQ. It is a large building with lots of postmen and sacks of mail.

The airmail gets sent by airship and then Rupert falls down a chute. He has to explain to the sorters that he is not some lost label-less parcel.

They decide to send him and his mum home so they ride in the airship with the mail. However they cannot stop the airship so Rupert and his mum don red parachutes and jump out over Nutwood, landing in their own garden to the amazement of Mr Bear who is just returning from work with his briefcase.

===Rupert and the Deep Freeze===

Rupert awakens to see that Jack Frost has drawn patterns on his window. Rupert meets Jack on the Common, he is searching for something - he has lost his special thermometer - which freezes things.

The thermometer looks like an icicle and Rupert offers to help look for it. There is a frozen pond which his chums are sliding on - weird that there is only ice in one place and the village fountain has not frozen.

Next morning there is a funny picture drawn in frost on Rupert's window and their clothes are frozen stiff on the washing line. The pavement in the village is very slippery and there is an accident where a lorry has shed its load - also the fountain is frozen stiff.

Ferdy the fox is hobbling along with a walking stick - he fell and hurt himself when the fountain froze over very quickly - dropping the 'magic wand' he had found.

Rupert realises that the 'wand' must be Jack Frost's thermometer - and now it is embedded in the fountain the ice keeps spreading outwards. Rupert explains this to the Professor who tries to free the wand with a blowtorch - but it re-freezes immediately. By the next morning the whole village is frozen and Rupert's house is hung with icicles.

The Professor and Rupert fly to the north pole to see King Frost - they are caught in a blizzard and forced to land - but luckily they are greeted by Rupert's Uncle Polar and go back to his igloo home. Once the storm is over the Professor flies home while Rupert and Uncle Polar go to visit King Frost. Here they are given 'thaw powder'.

Rupert is able to get back to Nutwood with Santa in his sleigh as it is Christmas Eve - Rupert throws the powder over the village as they are flying over.

===What I Thought===

This annual has a strong and glossy hard cover.

It is very colourful and filled with images of Rupert, his friends and also fairytale characters such as Little Bo Peep.

There are flowers with large smiling faces and the image wraps around and continues on the back cover showing Rupert's Uncle Polar and a woodland path, fringed with very friendly trees with smiling faces.

Inside the front and back covers are the endpapers - a trademark of all Rupert annuals. The ones in this annual are different to many in that they are in very muted sepia type tones. The image shows Rupert and his mum out for a stroll on a country lane and passing Gaffer Jarge's cottage - Gaffer is shown sitting outside his cottage and tipping his hat to Rupert's mum. The image is very quaint and old looking - Mrs Bear looks old fashioned in her long skirt an feathered hat while Gaffer looks just as you would expect an old style country gentleman to look - just sitting by the side of the lane with his walking stick watching the world go by - a lovely image.

Inside the book is a list of contents and the usual place for the owner to sign their name - there is also a price triangle on one of the pages showing 5.99.

This book has five stories - one features Pong Ping, dragons and China, one is about nursery rhyme characters, another features Rocky Bay and pirates, the next is about mail trains while the last one is about the Big Freeze.

This annual has a good mix of stories and although it does not have an actual Christmassy story Father Christmas does appear in the Deep Freeze story - which is certainly wintery if not very Christmassy. It has lovely icy images and the one of Rupert's house during the big freeze covered in icicles is very attractive. Also his Uncle Polar's igloo home is so homely and attractive - and very cosy.

The dragon story I suppose is the one I like the least - probably because I have never been very keen on the stories that go away from Nutwood village and end up in China - but other than that there is nothing wrong with the dragon story.

The second story I think would have to be my favourite - I love the magical nature of the story - being carried off in your sleep across the sea in your bed to a magical island - where you need your pals in pyjamas and also nursery rhyme characters - even the cute little babies up in the tree tops from 'Rock A By Baby'. The images themselves are delight, colourful and magical - and would be just the thing to fire a child's imagination - what better than to have a dream world you could visit in your sleep?

The Pirates story takes place at Rocky Bay - the seaside village Rupert always visits. This time he is with his friend Bill Badger - a good pirating story - and although Rupert is carried off by pirates - and they all get drunk and sleep it off - of course no real harm comes to Rupert and Bill.

The Mali Train story is very sweet and features lovely images of lots of postmen and old fashioned steam trains - at the end of the story Rupert and his mum parachute down into their garden - ad the look on Rupert's dad's face has to be seem to be believed - it is priceless.

This annual also contains a good medley of puzzles - something I think is essential for an annual. The Spot the Difference has a lovely image of Rupert in bed and there are plenty of other puzzles to amuse children once they have read the stories. One page is quite funny as its a large blank fame with Rupert and his pals standing by it - ready for you to do your own drawing - a quick and easy way for the compilers to fill a page!


Rupert Annual 1986
Rupert Annual 1986
by James Henderson
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars 50th Anniversary Annual for Rupert - great collector's item, 4 Oct 2013
This review is from: Rupert Annual 1986 (Hardcover)
===This is the 50th annual and was published in 1985===

===The Book===

Publisher: Express Newspaper (1985)
ASIN: B000U0974K
Hardcover
Daily Express Annual

===The Book in Detail===

Hard cover with image of Rupert being carried along in a procession by his friends. Rupert is carrying a copy of the first Rupert Annual which was published in 1936 - while Bill Badger is carrying a copy of this annual. The image on the cover wraps around to the back with more celebrations underway. Mrs Bear (Rupert's mum) has baked a cake which reads 'Happy Anniversary'. On the back cover among Rupert's friends is a gentleman in glasses with a notepad - this is meant to be Alfred Bestall who for many years worked on the Rupert Annuals and stories. The illustration is by John Harrold.
The endpapers at the front are also by John Harrold and show Rupert off for a jaunt in the woods, with the Elves of Spring looking on - this was entitled 'In Search of Adventure'.
Price triangle still present showing 2.75 and there is a place for a child to write their name.

The book contains six stories:
* Rupert, Bill and the Pearls - 22 pages
* Rupert and Pong Ping's Party - 11 pages
* Rupert and the Unknown Journey - 10 pages
* Rupert and the Snowstorm - 19 pages
* Rupert and the Pirate Boys - 18 pages
* Rupert and the Windmill - 14 pages.

The book also has:-
* Page of Rupert's 50 year history
* Page showing the original 1936 annual cover
* Page showing the original origami make from 1946.

===The Annual Itself===

First impressions was that I liked the cover - having a really good image of Rupert and his little home village of Nutwood. Most of his friends are present and it is a nice touch to have him carrying a copy of the 1936 annual. Also including Alfred Bestall on the back cover is a nice tribute to someone who spent so many years working 'with Rupert.
This book has six stories, one from each decade that the annuals have been produced. .
Rupert stories come in three levels - the colour pictures enable you to follow the story with a very young child, the rhyming couplets tell a bit more of the story, or you can read the full text in paragraphs at the
bottom of the page.
Each page mostly has four colour pictures each with rhyming couplets underneath, then at the bottom of the page are two larger paragraphs to read if you wish.
The illustrations are bright and colourful.

===Rupert's 50th Annual Page===

This page gives some background into the annuals, which began in 1936 and which were all done by Alfred Bestall until 1973 when he gave up doing the endpapers and covers - though some of his stories and drawings continued to be used.
This 50th annual is a salute to Alfred Bestall and contains a story from each decade.

===Rupert, Bill and the Pearls, 1930s story by Alfred Bestall===

Rupert and Bill make a guy, Bill dresses as they guy and runs into the woods, where they meet robbers and get kidnapped. Rupert gets away and eventually rescues Bill - along with the pearl necklace.

===Rupert and Pong Ping's Party, 1940s story by Alfred Bestall===

Rupert's friend Pong Ping takes him on a journey n a magic carpet. They travel over snow and eventually reach a desert island where natives live.
They fly off and Rupert's wish is to have a party at Nutwood - and when they arrive back there is a Christmas tree and loads of presents.

===Rupert and the Unknown Journey, 1950s story by Alfred Bestall===

Rupert finds a little man who does not speak English. Rupert then discovers a flying saucer and lots of other little people. They dress Rupert in a thick blue coat and warm gloves and then rescue their friend.

===Rupert and the Snowstorm, 1960s story by Alfred Bestal===

Rupert's dad has a cold, and while out fetching medicine Rupert sees a passing storm. this turns out to be a conjurer visiting Tiger Lily's home. Rupert falls in the snow and gets wet boots. However the conjurer gives Rupert a pair of magic boots that won't stop and he keeps walking round in circles in the snow. Tiger Lily makes them stop and Rupert heads home. Tiger Lily also brings special medicine for Rupert's dad which is better than that which Rupert was fetching for him.

===Rupert and the Pirate Boys, 1970s story by John Harrold and James Henderson===

Rupert is on holiday at rocky Bay and sees the Professor and his servant who he knows form Nutwood. they have a boat to try out - and it turns out to be a flying boat! It lands on an island and then gets involved with pirates.

===Rupert and the Windmill, 1980s story by John Harrold and James Henderson===

Rupert and his pals are out playing when they discover a windmill. It turns out their friend Bingo the dog is inside. However the sails go round so fast the windmill takes off and flies over the sea. They end up landing on a boat with smugglers.

===What I Thought===

This annual is a great collectors piece for any Rupert fans.
The cover is bright and colourful, showing Rupert and all his friends - it is also a fitting tribute to have an image of Alfred Bestall among Rupert's pals on the back cover of the book.
For those who are not familiar with Rupert the page on his 50 years of annuals is very interesting.
The book has a story from each decade from 1936 to 1985/6 when this book was published - it is a testament to the timeless quality of Rupert that if you did not know the dates of the Rupert stories you would be hard pressed to tell which were the older ones and which were the new.
On the cover Rupert is holding a copy of he original 1936 Rupert Annual and the full wrap-around back and front cover is reproduced inside this annual - showing Rupert out with his friends and flying a kite - and with the Professor's Tower in the background.
There is a good mix of stories and two that have references to snow and Christmas - which is always fitting for a book that comes out in time for Christmas.
The origami page is a reproduction of the very first one included in a Rupert Annual - a paper bird form the 1946 edition.
Two things are missing from this book though - the back does not have endpapers - the first time I have ever seen this - as always the ones from the front are also on the back, plus there are no puzzles in this edition - again something that the others have always had as far as I can recall.
However as this is a 50th commemorative book it is entitled to be slightly different.

===Its good points===

* Super cover.
* Gives 50 year's of Rupert Annual history.
* Commemorates Alfred Bestall.
* Has copy of 1936 Rupert cover.Has copy of 1946 origami bird.

===Bad Points===

* No puzzle pages.
* No back endpapers.

===Would I Recommend?===

Yes - has five stories - just what you need in an annual.


The Time Keeper
The Time Keeper
by Mitch Albom
Edition: Paperback
Price: 4.52

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book may make you think of Time in a different way, 17 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Time Keeper (Paperback)
'With endless time, nothing is special. With no loss or sacrifice, we can't appreciate what we have.'

===Sort Synopsis===

This story starts 6 millennia ago when a man first discovers how to record time and is banished and turned into Father Time.
Only in the 20th century is he released to make amends - ad he has two people to meet up with and work through their problems. A fictional fable about how we think of everything in relation to Time.

===My Opinion===

I have been quite a fan of Mitch Albom, enjoying his two other books, 'The Five People You Meet in Heaven' and 'Tuesdays with Morrie'.
I quite enjoy time travel stories so when say this book was newly released on Amazon I decided to give it a try.
Like all other of Mitch's books it is written in an easy to read style. The chapters are very short and there are quite a few pages with just a few lines of writing on, so although the book is classed as
256 pages the actual story only takes up 136 of them and being short chapters as well you can read it really quickly. You could easily finish it in a day.
I am not quite sure what I think of this book and it was not until you actually got to the end of the story that you had any idea how things would work out.
The main character is Dor, who is clever and figures out how to record time with sticks and shadows. For bringing the awareness of time to the human race he is banished - but then comes back to save two individuals.
I am sorry to say this book did not grip me quite as the other Mitch Albom books did. I enjoyed reading it and wanted to keep reading the net page and the next age, but although it was dealing with how we think of time and how we value it, or not, it did not really resonate with me as much as it should have done.
According to the book 'everything happens when it is supposed to'.
You get to see a certain part of the future where ' everyone can live longer than we imagined. They fill every waking minute with action, but they are empty'.
It is a moral tale to encourage people to value the time they have, and not to wish for the past or the future - tie is limited on earth - so that we value it more - ''There is a reason God limited our days - to make each one special'. For 'when you are measuring time, you are not living it'.
I did enjoy this book in its way - and am not sure really why I feel slightly detached from the characters. I would recommend this as a quick short read - quite enjoyable - but not quite as good as some of Albom's other works


Tuesdays With Morrie: An old man, a young man, and life's greatest lesson
Tuesdays With Morrie: An old man, a young man, and life's greatest lesson
by Mitch Albom
Edition: Paperback
Price: 4.86

5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking little book on how to approach life, illness and death in a positive way, 15 Sep 2013
===Brief Synopsis===

This book is about an old Sociology Professor called Morris Schwartz and the rekindled relationship he has with one of his former students, Mitch Albom, shortly before his death.
This is a true story about Mitch's Tuesday visits to see his former tutor who was terminally ill with ALS - a long name for what we would call Motor Neurone Disease.
Mitch had not seen his old tutor since graduation, when he had promised to stay in touch - but didn't.
Now 37 years old and looking for meaning in his life, he finds his Tuesday visits to Morrie, who has made death his final project, very inspiring.

===My Opinion===

This is a short and easy to read book which I have re-read quite easily in a day.
It is written in an easily understood style and is set out in the form of 14 Tuesday lesson between Albom and Morrie.
After graduation Mitch fails to keep in touch with his tutor, and goes along the path of sport's journalist - being interested in career and money and too busy to have children. A chance glimpse of Morrie in a TV programme prompts Mitch to get back in touch - his old tutor now only has months to live and Mitch helps to chronicle his last fight with the illness, and also learns what are the important things in life.In a way this could be seen as a sad book as it chronicles someone's losing battle against a crippling disease which in the end will paralyse and kill him. However Mollie's spirit shines through as he refuses to feel self pity. He states he allows himself to feel sad for a little while in the morning and then he gets on with his days. One of Morrie's quotes is ' the way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning'. Morrie believed love was the most important thing in life - 'to learn how to give out love, and to let it come in'.
Mitch begins to tape their Tuesday sessions and each one tends to have a different theme - regrets, death, family, ageing, forgiveness etc.
One touching passage is when Morrie says how much he appreciates the window - weird you might think - but being housebound this window affords him a view of the changing seasons outside - as if he can actually see time passing outside the window. To well people the window would mean nothing, but to a bed bound person it can mean a whole lot more. It makes people think of things form a different perspective.
Morrie talks about detachment, and explains how of course he will feel envy for youngsters who are fit and strong - but Morrie's way is to feel the emotion, and then let it go.
Almost up until the day of his death when he was fighting for breath Mitch continued to visit - and while Morrie gained from having the visits of his younger friend, Mitch also gained insight into life from the lessons his elderly tutor was teaching him - of how to live life and how to accept illness and approach death.
Morrie know that his 'Tuesdays' would be published as a book and he even chose the title himself.
A thought provoking book which makes us confront our own impending deaths and the infirmities that old age can bring.

Although the book itself is 210 pages the last pages from 195 onwards is an introduction to Albom's other book - 'The Five People You Meet in Heaven' and contains the first chapter to whet your interest.


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