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Dr. I. Finlay "i_finlay" (Condorrat, Scotland)
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This Is My Doctrine: The Development of Mormon Theology
This Is My Doctrine: The Development of Mormon Theology
by Charles R. Harrell
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 20.58

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open and non-apologetic, 19 Nov 2013
Although Harrell is a Mormon he provides a very open and non-apologetic survey of the basic doctrines of Mormonism. After the introduction, each chapter takes a basic doctrine of Mormonism and traces the history of that doctrine through the Old and New Testaments (drawing on a wide range of scholarship), nineteenth century theology in the USA and through various phases of the development of doctrine within the LDS church. Contradictions within the development of doctrine in Mormonism are neither avoided nor explained - they are just set out to be judged by the reader. This bool is well worth reading by anyone wishing to see how doctrine has evolved on the LDS church and how that doctrine relates to other Christian perspectives.


Letter to a Doubter (Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture)
Letter to a Doubter (Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture)
Price: 0.77

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent and Thoughtful, 24 April 2013
This is an intelligent and thoughtful article addressed to members of the Mormon Church who have some doubts about the truth claims made by the Church. It addresses both some common, specific reasons for doubt and also provides a general approach for dealing with doubts. It is well worth the short time it takes to read


Muhammad: Prophet for Our Time (Eminent Lives)
Muhammad: Prophet for Our Time (Eminent Lives)
by Karen Armstrong
Edition: Paperback

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Important contribution, 27 Dec 2009
Armstrong has provided a very clear, readable and fair account of the life of the Muhammed and the founding years of Islam. It is an important book for those who want an introduction to most recent of the three monotheistic faiths. It emphasises the tolerance of Muhammed towards Judaism and Christianity (he encouraged the Jews and Christians of Medina to use what was essentially the first purpose built mosque as a place for their own prayers). It also provides good contextualised accounts of the attitudes of Muhammed towards war, women and living a good life. One gets the very strong impression that Armstrong's Muhammed would be horrified by some of the actions of some of his followers today. However, he would hopefully also be proud of the majority of Muslims still trying to follow the teachings he promoted.


Livescribe 4GB Titanium Pulse Smartpen
Livescribe 4GB Titanium Pulse Smartpen

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A key resource for researchers, 27 Dec 2009
As a qualitative researcher who spends a great deal of time interviewing I find my Livescribe Pulse Pen immensely useful. I'd hate to go back to using a normal digital recorder with having to fast forward and backwards to find a quote or section of an interview. The Livescribe works well for both individual and group interviews (I interviewed a group of 8 teenagers spread around a large space and still got clear playback). Battery life is great between recharges - 7 or 8 hours of interviews. Interviewees are always impressed and often ask about it - it's always a plus to be able to impress teenage interviewees with technology when one is a 50-something researcher!!


Why There Almost Certainly is a God: Doubting Dawkins
Why There Almost Certainly is a God: Doubting Dawkins
by Keith Ward
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

28 of 39 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good in parts, 19 July 2009
Like the curate's egg this book is good in parts in that it partially succeeds and partially fails in its intention to show 'Why there almost certainly is a God'. One of its successes is to highlight some of the philosophical weaknesses in 'The God Delusion'. It is, however, not surprising that a professional philosopher and theologian should score some points over a zoologist on this account. In my view as a lay reader of philosophy and serious sceptic of the existence of God, Ward fails to convince that there almost certainly is a God other than through the acceptance of premises that are far from secure. What he does do is to show that it is possible to construct a coherent and rational argument for the possible existence of a God but is it the God that many adherents of monotheistc religions would recognise? For people interested in reading accounts on both sides of the current battle between theists and atheists, this is a worthwhile contribution to look in to. It is not an easy read though and probably requires some familiarity with analytical philosophy to fully appreciate.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 15, 2009 1:08 PM BST


Why I Am Still an Anglican: Essays and Conversations
Why I Am Still an Anglican: Essays and Conversations
by Caroline Chartres
Edition: Paperback
Price: 16.33

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost thou enticeth me to become an Anglican, 19 July 2009
I am not and never have been an Anglican yet I very much enjoyed this very diverse selection of accounts of their church membership by prominent Anglicans. The range of short essays highlights the inclusive nature of the Church of England. The range of contributors is impressive from the satirist Ian Hislop, the judge Elizabeth Butler-Sloss to the convert from Judaism Hugh Montefiore. If you want to know what some Anglicans think and feel about their Church, then this book is for you.


On Chesil Beach
On Chesil Beach
by Ian McEwan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perceptive, 19 July 2009
This review is from: On Chesil Beach (Paperback)
This is the second McEwan novel that I've read. The other was 'Atonement' long before the film was made. I was not disappointed with either. I'm not a novelist so am always impressed when I read a novel that seems to capture the thoughts and feelings of people unlike the author in such an apparently authentic way. I write apparently since I was neither a young man or young woman in the 1950s as the main characters are, but McEwan made his characters very believable for me. McEwan builds up a wonderful sense of unease and carries this right through the novel which concerns a relationship in which the main characters are unable to communicate their sexual intentions and fears in the period immediately before the emancipation of the 1960s. This is a novel that engages the mind and the heart although one feels like screaming at the characters "just speak to each other" but of course the whole point is that they don't (maybe like many young people of that period). One of my favourite reads this year.


The Future of Education: Reimagining Our Schools from the Ground Up
The Future of Education: Reimagining Our Schools from the Ground Up
by Kieran Egan
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 18.58

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful Analysis, 14 April 2009
Egan challenges the notion that schools can simultaneously meet the different aims expected of them which are to develop the individual, to socialise the individual and to prepare him or her for a vocation. He describes the philosophical roots of these aims then proposes rather that schools ought to develop different kinds of cognitive understanding. He imagines a fifty year implementation trajectory of his ideas.

Egan's analysis of the current state of schooling and of the roots of some of the problems is sound. He draws however, more on philosophy and psychology than he does on sociology and political science. One can easily imagine a situation in which his ideas were fully implemented yet there still existed deep divisions in terms of attainment and achievement by young people broadly following class structures. One could also imagine deep political resistance to the implentation of a schooling system that does not explicitly address the needs of employers.

That said Egan's proposals offer an clearly thought through alternative to the constant battles over education being raged in most developed states.


The Spiral Staircase
The Spiral Staircase
by Karen Armstrong
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.89

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Spiral Staircase, 17 April 2006
This review is from: The Spiral Staircase (Paperback)
In this third volume of Karen Armstrong's biography, she traces her life journey from the time she left the convent and her life as a nun to the present day. She writes of her initial rejection of God and all things religious. She wrote and presented television programmes that promoted a secular view. Her life was marred for a long time by undiagnosed epilepsy, which resulted in the feeling (regrettably supported by her psychologist) that she had serious mental illness. Eventually she returned to religion but not to the conventional God of Western religion. She started to view religions as adherence to certain practices which took one out of oneself. Good religion is that which promotes compassion - feeling what others feel and not treating them in ways in which one would not like to be treated. Bad religion is that which promotes intolerance and hatred. This is a very well-written book that explores one person's search for meaning. It is worth reading by those who are religious, irreligious or just not sure. For me there remained one unanswered question - How can belief and practice be divorced? Whether one adheres to a religious view or not, our beliefs influence our practices but our practices also affect our beliefs.


Jenkins: The Armed Man - A Mass For Peace
Jenkins: The Armed Man - A Mass For Peace
Price: 6.50

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prescient, 25 Jan 2004
Until recently I thought that the Armed Man: A Mass for Peace was a reaction to the event of 11 September 2001, but amazingly it was released on the day before that tragedy. It really makes a significant statement about the futility of war and violence as a means of resolving differences. It is also so much more than just the Benedictus which receives so much airplay on the radio. Each movement is worth listening to and each has its own special message. The juxtaposition of the Christian Mass with the Moslem Call to Prayers reminds us of our common spiritual heritage. The powerful and martial tones of Save Me From Bloody Men is set between the tranquillity of the Sanctus and the Kyrie. The Royal Armouries did us all a great service by commissioning this work for a new millenium - sadly the message is just as relevant as for the previous millenium. Listen to this and live the message.


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