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Tom Anderson

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Sonaten und Werke für Streichorch.
Sonaten und Werke für Streichorch.

5.0 out of 5 stars Simply beautiful, 25 Nov 2012
This is an absolutely gorgeous little album, especially the horn pieces by Mercadante and Cherubini. The Cherubini can be found on various recordings, but this is my favourite. The horn playing is soft, sensual and enchanting and amply supported by I Solisti Aquilani. I have listened to it over and over, and simply love it. The clarinet works are also good although the tone is a little bright for my liking; I prefer Joy Farrall's recordings of Mercadante. Nevertheless this is one of my favourtie CDs and worth 5 stars.


Scientific Approach
Scientific Approach
by J. T. Davies
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Nice little book, 21 Nov 2003
This review is from: Scientific Approach (Hardcover)
Those interested in the philosophy of scientific method will find that this book introduces some of the basic concepts with a refreshing clarity that is absent from so many philosophy books. Davies uses numerous nicely chosen practical examples to illustrate how theories originate, are tested, and generate the laws upon which science stands. You'll need more than this book to get through a philosophy degree, but it does provide some interesting, down-to-earth material for those interested in the subject.


Rough Ride
Rough Ride
by Paul Kimmage
Edition: Paperback

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trials and tribulations of a pro cyclist, 20 Oct 2003
This review is from: Rough Ride (Paperback)
This book is about how Kimmage develops and nurtures his boyhood dream – to become a successful and respected professional cyclist – and how this dream is gradually undermined and eventually smashed by the corrupt nature of the sport he so dearly loves. A central theme is how his high moral principles with regard to drug taking are gradually eroded away as he himself struggles to stay in touch with the gruelling demands of tour cycling. His account of drug abuse in the sport is truly shocking. But the book is far more than an exposé of drugs in sport. It’s an adventure that provides a real inside view of the hectic and difficult life that a pro-cyclist has to endure, in most cases for relatively meagre reward. Nothing like the boyhood dream. It’s about the trials and tribulations, the joy, frustration, anguish, pain, and many other emotions Kimmage goes through during his cycling career. The writing is absolutely superb – read the book and you’ll feel the emotion for yourself. Can’t recommend it more highly.


A Guide Through the Theory of Knowledge
A Guide Through the Theory of Knowledge
by Adam Morton
Edition: Paperback

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent introductory text, 19 Sep 2003
This book provides an introduction to epistemology, the theory of knowledge. The text is clear and easy to follow, Morton utilising numerous well-chosen examples from everyday life to illustrate his points. Moreover the book remains focused and to-the-point throughout. Too many introductory books on philosophy start well and then get bogged down in unnecessary wrangling over arguments of little interest to the beginner in this field. Not this one. Morton lives up to his introductory statement that he will “try not to wallow in the difficulties” associated with epistemology.
The book is aimed at students taking formal courses in philosophy. It is therefore written from an educational viewpoint. I wouldn’t describe it as a particularly exciting or entertaining read, although some of the moose scenarios are quite amusing. As a source of information and learning, Morton’s objective, the book achieves it aim. There are a series of questions at the end of each chapter, as well as suggested further reading. However answers are not provided – those unable to complete the questions for themselves are recommended to “ask for an explanation in a lecture or discussion group”. Readers without such access are somewhat at a disadvantage. Nevertheless the book serves its purpose well. I found it useful, and recommend it to students and others wanting to study epistemology alike.


Bent Larsen's Good Move Guide (Oxford chess books)
Bent Larsen's Good Move Guide (Oxford chess books)
by Bent Larsen
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A little gem of a book, 4 Sep 2003
Larsen guides the reader through a series of exercises: tactics, middlegame planning, and endgames. He’s done a great job in choosing positions to analyse which emphasise themes that occur in practical play. However he himself acknowledges that these positions are “worth spending a good deal of time on”. In other words, they are not easy, but will reap real benefits for those players who patiently work through them. This book is ideal for club players who are making a serious attempt to improve their game. Beginners with little knowledge of chess should seek simpler texts.


Voodoo Science: The Road from Foolishness to Fraud
Voodoo Science: The Road from Foolishness to Fraud
by Robert L. Park
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.98

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beware of bad science, 4 Sep 2003
In principle scientific method is all about objectively and critically testing theories and updating them in the light of new evidence. Park shows how scientists’ prejudices, being inclined to see only what they expect or want to see, can lead them down the road to pathological science (where they fool themselves) or worse junk science (where they deliberately try to fool others). He repeatedly shows examples of failures to abandon theories even in the face of apparently powerful refuting evidence, as well as how easy it is for people with insufficient scientific knowledge to be taken in by those theories. The book is an entertaining read, with stories about cold fusion, UFOs, ESP and many more. My only criticism is that I find Park’s style somewhat overly opinionated, perhaps not being objective enough himself. One obvious example, which is very much an open issue, is where he has: “The great global warming debate, then, is more an argument about values than it is about science.” I don’t find his arguments strong enough to make such a forward statement. Nevertheless the book is a very enjoyable journey through many types of unorthodox science, as well as providing a thought-provoking read for those interested in scientific method.


An Active Repertoire for Black: King's Indian Defense and Sicilian Defence (Scheveningen Variation)
An Active Repertoire for Black: King's Indian Defense and Sicilian Defence (Scheveningen Variation)
by Dražen Marović
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A useful introductory text, 4 Sep 2003
Marovic presents an active repertoire for the player with the black pieces based around the Kings Indian Defence and Scheveningen variation of the Sicilian Defence. An advantage of these openings is that, while being enterprising and energetic in character, they are not full of mega-sharp lines which have to be memorised (unlike, for example, the Bg5 lines in the Najdorf variation of the Sicilian). If you want to master these openings then it is important to learn themes, attacking and defensive ideas, and not lines. This book does an admirable job in providing material to this end. The analysis is good, and the main lines given sufficient coverage. The one area I found to be weak was the treatment of sidelines such as the c3 and Closed Sicilians, which are particularly popular at club level. It's a little bizarre that the Wing Gambit, which is almost never seen, is given as much treatment as the Grand Prix Attack, which is popular. The book is of course a little dated by now with opening theory developing so fast in modern times. Strong players will need to search out recent developments from up to date sources. Nevertheless I recommend this book as an excellent introduction to playing these complex, yet manageable, openings for club players who want to delve into them for the first time.


Dreams of a Final Theory: Search for the Ultimate Laws of Nature (Radius Books)
Dreams of a Final Theory: Search for the Ultimate Laws of Nature (Radius Books)
by Steven Weinberg
Edition: Hardcover

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent, thought-provoking book., 2 Sep 2003
A final theory – an all-embracing explanation of the laws of nature – is the ultimate dream of science. Weinberg is optimistic that such a theory, rejected as a possibility by philosophers such as Popper, can indeed be unravelled. The book is underpinned by a description of the historical progression of knowledge about the laws of physics. Some of the description of quantum mechanics and other aspects of physics are heavy going for non-physicists such as myself. Those interested in Einstein’s theories and developments since will probably find this book full of interesting information in that regard. From my perspective the book is most important in the issues it raises and addresses relating to the philosophy of science. Weinberg shows a good understanding of philosophy, critically examining scientific method and questioning the relevance of philosophy to this methodology in the modern world. The obvious question to ask is whether a final theory can ever be reached. Weinberg provides an interesting case that it can – but I won’t spoil the fun by giving away his arguments here. The text is well written and easy to follow. I found this book an interesting and thought-provoking read, despite my lack of knowledge about physics. I recommend it as essential reading for anyone with an interest in the philosophy of science.
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Bones of Contention: The Archaeopteryx Scandals
Bones of Contention: The Archaeopteryx Scandals
by Paul Chambers
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.01

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Feuding over fossils: scientific infighting., 1 Sep 2003
So-called “missing links” between animal groups are of great significance because they are central to Darwin’s theory of evolution. The Archaeopteryx fossils stimulated interest in such a link between dinosaurs and birds. Interpretation of fossil evidence is however far from straightforward. In this superb book Chambers takes the reader through a history of the discovery of fossil evidence pertaining to the evolution of birds, focussing in particular on the Archaeopteryx specimens which are the most contentious of all. The book describes not just the fossils, the circumstances in which they were found, and their relevance to the bird evolution debate, but also the extraordinary lengths to which scientists would go to acquire the fossils for themselves and use them to promote their own heavily biased views of evolution. Chambers does an excellent job of bringing to life the heated debates and cantankerous actions of successive generations of palaeontologists from the mid 19th century (when the first Archaeopteryx was found) until the present day. The book is as much about the stubborn and prejudiced actions of these men, offering fascinating insight into so-called scientific method, as about the progress in understanding bird evolution. It is a smooth and easy read, purposefully free of jargon. If you have an interest in natural history, and especially dinosaurs, and like a good story of intrigue and scandal, then get yourself a copy.


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