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Zipster Zeus (UK)

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Zookki Gopro Accessories for Gopro Hero 4 3+ 3 2 Gopro Accessory Kit for Gopro Hero 4 Black Silver Gopro Hero 3+ Black Silver Gopro Hero 3 Black Silver Gopro Hero 2 Black Silver SJ4000 SJ5000 SJ6000 Sports Camera Accessory Kit in Parachuting Swimming Rowing Surfing Skiing Climbing Running Bike Riding Camping Diving Outing Any Other Outdoor Sports
Zookki Gopro Accessories for Gopro Hero 4 3+ 3 2 Gopro Accessory Kit for Gopro Hero 4 Black Silver Gopro Hero 3+ Black Silver Gopro Hero 3 Black Silver Gopro Hero 2 Black Silver SJ4000 SJ5000 SJ6000 Sports Camera Accessory Kit in Parachuting Swimming Rowing Surfing Skiing Climbing Running Bike Riding Camping Diving Outing Any Other Outdoor Sports
Offered by ZookkiDirect-UK
Price: £99.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Eexcellent selection of accessories that's difficult to fault, 1 Aug. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A really excellent selection of accessories that's difficult to fault in it's range and versatility. The quality is very good too, no problems on that score, definitely comparable with Go Pro's own stuff and at a fraction of the price. If you use a Go-Pro and love your action-enabling accessories, you can't go wrong with this bit of kit, all enclosed in a nice strong carry box and sack too.


From Puppy to PERFECT: A proven, practical guide to training and caring for your new puppy
From Puppy to PERFECT: A proven, practical guide to training and caring for your new puppy
by Janet Menzies
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.05

4.0 out of 5 stars Informative as well as enjoyable to read, 1 Aug. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A nicely illustrated book that is informative as well as enjoyable to read, full of sound tips and advice on how to raise your puppy into a mature, well behaved but still fun and rounded adult dog. Some of the stuff you'll already know, some you'll have a vague idea about but need more detail and then there will be gems of info you've never come across before- that's the strength of this handbook, you get all that useful stuff in one place and this is one book that will quickly become dog-eared from use. Well worth a look.


AmazonBasics Everyday Flat Sheet, Ivory 280 x 320 + 10 cm
AmazonBasics Everyday Flat Sheet, Ivory 280 x 320 + 10 cm
Price: £28.49

4.0 out of 5 stars Comfortable, large, and good quality day-to-day flat bed sheet, 31 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Well the first thing I have to say is that don't be mislead by the 'Basics' tag Amazon puts on this product- it's far from ordinary bargain basement fayre. This is actually a very good quality 100% cotton flat sheet that is of a decent, durable gauge and very soft to the touch. It's a nicely toned ivory colour too which is neutral enough to be adaptable to a range of other bed linen colourways. Be warned size-wise though as there's no scrimping here- we are in super-king/emperor bed size territory so if you're using it on a smaller bed get ready for plenty of tuck-in [which some people actually like of course].

A very comfortable, good day-to-day standard sheet all in all, that washes well too. Can't really go wrong.


China's Coming War with Asia
China's Coming War with Asia
by Jonathan Holslag
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a look for an interesting contemporary analysis, 30 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A decent enough analysis of the current and potential power of China in geo-political terms. It has to be said the title is a little alarmist and aimed at grabbing a readers attention first and foremost, which to be fair it definitely does! Holslag approach in the narrative though is not sensationalist and rather than a populist tract of 'futurology' we get an analytical exercise in political science than nonetheless is very readable and thought-provoking.

It seems reasonable to think that China will become the dominant power in Asia and possibly even a world super-power to rival the US but as any student of history knows, nothing is a given. China is poised to become very powerful though and it will want [indeed already does to some extent] to exert strong influences and both hard and soft power over it's backyard, namely Asia. The core of the debate to my mind is whether China will pile it's political and economic powers more into hard or soft power, or will it try to balance the two, and this book does an good job of providing a contemporary outline of the possible future path of China with regard to those issues.

The world is continually changing and the 21st century is shaping up to be very different from the last- obvious statements really but in the West, as we now enjoy entrenched managerial politics and the fantasy dogma of There Is No Alternative becomes hegemonic- particularly in the arena of liberal globalisation- it's something many of us tend to forget. There are a number of quite different forces at work though in the world and China is one and we would do well not to graft our own western mindset onto the country and it's political system and ambitions. For example China does not seem to exhibit world-wide imperial intentions along the lines of western powers and it's arsenal of control and influence are largely economic at the moment, but that may change, particularly in Asia itself. There too though other challenges for China to overcome as India becomes more powerful for example. There is also the prospect of a more isolationist [and democratically inclined] US in the region with the protection of an increasingly 'Scandinavianised' Japan and South Korea being it's only concern- a balance of power China may actually judge as beneficial and which it will endevour to maintain- and so we have a very dynamic and ultimately unpredictable future for the region. It may lead to an old fashioned 'hot war' in places, but future power struggles and conflict may well take on a decidedly 21st century nature and be more nuanced but, ultimately, be still as deadly.

So all in all this is a good, snappy essay that gives a good snapshot of the current situation and possible developments from it. In 5 years time it may well be decidedly out of date, but for an interesting contemporary analysis, this is worth a look.


This is Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction
This is Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction
by Pete Mandik
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.33

3.0 out of 5 stars A cogent but not as balanced introductory text to philosophy of mind as it should be, 28 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A basic primer in this wide, and deeply complex area of philosophy- in fact an area arguably that is central to the whole discipline. So it is vital books such as these are accessible and as evenly balanced in their presentation as possible.

In the first half of the book each analysis and argument for a particular understanding of the issue of human mind is charted chapter by chapter and explained succinctly and reasonably clearly with opposing arguments briefly concluding each section. The narrative develops into a deeper analysis as the book goes on and so it's more rewarding to read the book cover-to-cover first, although the author himself does say it's possible to dip in and read whatever chapters you wish as and when- which is possible because on a basic level each are freestanding which is great for quick reference purposes. However the issues discussed in each chapter are unavoidably interlinked- and it has to be said Mandik's outlines are not entirely balanced- so to get a full picture you need to read them all.

The book aims to be an introduction to the field of philosophy of mind, and on a basic level the author achieves this reasonably well. Where Mandik is less successful though is maintained an entirely balanced account of the issues. To give him credit he tries valiantly initially to stay even handed but he fails increasingly as the book progresses, particularly on the critical and important counter concepts to what are clearly his own physicalist ones- and later on in the book he gives up entirely on any pretense of tackling the subject in the round. This is most apparent when tackling the schools of thought on dualism and idealism, during which you can hear the poor lad straining to stop himself shouting 'this is all fanciful rubbish, the mind is the brain, end of!!!' It's a position you can quite legitimately take of course, but it's not a very useful one in a basic text that is intended to be a broadly introductory one.

To be fair it's such a huge task to avoid such shortfalls in a relatively slim text as this, and in this area of thought it's nigh on impossible to avoid confirmation bias here and there. And so this book exhibits the inevitable, common intellectual default- particularly in US academic circles- towards materialism/physicalism as the most expedient explanation when it comes to considerations of the mind-body problem. That is, the simplest explanation is that the brain is the mind- the mind is essentially a physical property, nothing more- and when the going gets tough with this basic premise, the appeals to promissory materialism- the old 'we don't know yet but modern science will surely confirm our thoughts on this concept [aka bias] one day' kicks in a little too often.

This is well illustrated in the discussion on qualia [e.g. the experience of seeing red, as opposed to only intellectually understanding the scientific principles inherent in the colour, but never actually seeing/experiencing it, leaving you not fully understanding red at all]. It can be argued- and Mandik clearly believes- we currently don't understand how the brain produces this mental phenomenon in the same way the Ancient Greeks didn't have the benefit of Einstein's Theory of Relativity in order to understand the wider universe. Science always advances you see. This is a deeply flawed position to take, as 'common sense' [which ironically Mandik evokes a number of times in his veiled criticism of non-physicalist positions] alone tells us from historical experience, it is conceivable even Einstein's equations themselves will be proven flawed in the future, meaning there is a possibility the Greeks with their alternative, sophisticated models of the universe, missed out on little. Science 'develops,' that doesn't necessarily translate as 'advances' in that that development may be more cyclical than linear, a mistake modern science and materialists make far too often these days.

It remains a fact also that scientifically, there is no neurological evidence at all the brain produces consciousness and indeed, there is growing scientific/experimental evidence to the contrary. No mention is made of this though in the section on identity theory, which is strange considering the authors keenness to mention the powers of the modern scientific method elsewhere in the book.

Unfortunately Mandik moves too far into his favoured physicalist position in the second half of the book as he succumbs full-on to his faith in modern science to inform all issues of philosophy of mind in his, again, over-long analyses of functionalism and his final pinning of his colours to the mast of physical causal closure. By now the book is offering a shape of philosophy of mind stripped of any metaphysical considerations and firmly rooted in the laws of physics, which is fair enough as a personal point of view, but it is delivered towards the end of this book as a fait accompli when of course it is nothing of the sort. There's no room in a review such as this to point out the flaws in the concept of physical causal closure alone [which Mandik does describe quickly as a thesis but quickly passes over that and delivers it to the reader as a firm 'common sense' fact of reality] of which there are many, or the changing nature of our understanding of energy conservation- a field constantly adapting, often very quietly in modern science, as old beliefs are over-turned- suffice to say they are not rock solid, permanent theories although to read this book, towards the end the uninitiated would be led to belief they are so.

These are perhaps inevitable flaws considering the compact size of the book and the cultural constraints it's written within but considering the basic nature and intended scope of the book, they are unfortunate shortfalls. On the plus side though he at times tries to offer cogent counter-arguments to each topic area he charts, he just brushes them aside a bit too easily later on in the text, and concentrates too much on other issues such as in the overlong look at the possibility of artificial intelligence, which is of course a contemporary 'hot' issue at the moment, but yet another one overloaded with unrealistic scientific optimism.

So in the end not the balanced introduction to understandings of philosophy of mind I would have hoped, and one that slips too easily into the politically correct received wisdom of current scientific/academic materialist dogma. Which is a shame. If anything though, a reader should be intrigued enough to look deeper into the subject and get a more detailed, nuanced take on the varied, complex but fascinating issues this field holds.


Project Management For Dummies
Project Management For Dummies
by Nick Graham
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.59

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction to the dark arts of 'Project Management', 26 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
In these days when everyone sees themselves as a project manager in some form or another- even people getting a new kitchen put in on makeover programmes- this book will probably have quite a wide appeal beyond those who are professionally involved in the discipline.

This is a Business-As-Usual Dummies book- well laid out, written in a lively but comprehensive and focused style. It's one of the weightier Dummies editions, checking in at over 400 pages, but for that you get an excellent, in-depth but well structured and clear to follow introduction to the dark arts of Project Management.

So read, find a project and go-manage. The 21st century demands nothing less of you!


King of Flash iPhone 6 Black 4.7" 2014 Premium Quality Sports Armband for Jogging, Running, Gym, Cycling with Key Pocket - Universal Size
King of Flash iPhone 6 Black 4.7" 2014 Premium Quality Sports Armband for Jogging, Running, Gym, Cycling with Key Pocket - Universal Size
Offered by KING OF FLASH
Price: £4.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Good quality, nice little bit of kit, 26 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Not a bad armband to hold your iphone 6 actually and for the price, pretty good value. Fastens with Velcro so adaptable enough and the hold is firm. The phone nestles nicely in the waterproof holder and I like the key holder for gym use, nice touch. Overall, good quality, nice little bit of kit for those who want to keep their iphone handy when working out or running etc.


Fundamentals of Children's Anatomy and Physiology: A Textbook for Nursing and Healthcare Students
Fundamentals of Children's Anatomy and Physiology: A Textbook for Nursing and Healthcare Students
by Ian Peate
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.48

4.0 out of 5 stars Reliable introductory textbook for anyone in this field, 26 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Reliable introductory reference for those with an interest in children's anatomy and physiology. A well laid out and detailed text with useful illustrations that is essential for anyone professionally involved in childcare or are hoping to enter the field as a career. It also has the now usual and invaluable website hook-up and good self-assessment exercises throughout. If this is your field, a must-have I'd say.


BETA Adult  Shepherds & Setters with Lamb Dry Dog Food, 12 kg
BETA Adult Shepherds & Setters with Lamb Dry Dog Food, 12 kg
Price: £29.62

5.0 out of 5 stars A hearty paws up from our hounds, 26 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Our two dogs simply love this brand of dog food- they wolf it down like there's no tomorrow and really, that must be the acid test. For human concerns though, the ingredient mix is excellent and I've never found our dogs experiencing digestive problems with this dry food. The mix of fish oils is impressive and essential, particularly for our older dog and the range of added minerals and vitamins is spot on and, again, an extra dimension you pay more for with high quality foodstuffs such as this.

Having used this particular dry food for some time, I can say it really does keep your dog well nourished and healthy. May seem expensive at first, but you are getting an excellent food and of course, a little goes a long way as it's a rich food rather filler. Well worth a try.


The Inner Enemies of Democracy
The Inner Enemies of Democracy
by Tzvetan Todorov
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

5.0 out of 5 stars A vital, contentious book, 26 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a vital, contentious book for those who wish to be provoked into serious thought and challenged into asymmetrically assessing an increasing political and culturally asymmetrical 21st century world.

Todorov in this short but punchy book, tackles head on the myths we have developed around ourselves regarding western democracy and as this is a model, with all it's structural flaws, we have exported throughout the world, it's failings are a global problem now, as much as one for advanced industrial societies.

The crux of Todorov's argument is that we are either incapable- or more truthfully unwilling- to look at the internal structural problems of the democratic model we have developed, and are allowing it to morph into a form of corporatism. This is happening because our 21st century external threats are indistinct and difficult to simply pinpoint and, crucially, aren't really a serious, real and present threat to our democratic system at all. The old, lumpen certainties of the fascist/communist threat have fallen by the wayside, and so it is no longer easy to ignore our own internal problems anymore by projecting our attention away from them onto some external 'threat.'

You won't agree with everything in this book, but you are guaranteed a lively poke towards looking at the world differently, and may perhaps find yourself able to stand back a little and assess the received wisdom imposed on us day in day out by a hegemonic establishment media a bit more critically. A great book.


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