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G. Shields (Sussex, UK)
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Popamazing 4ft Heavy Duty Clothes Rail High Metal Garment Hanging Rack - 120cm x 48cm x 150cm unfolded
Popamazing 4ft Heavy Duty Clothes Rail High Metal Garment Hanging Rack - 120cm x 48cm x 150cm unfolded
Offered by Popamazing UK Shipping
Price: £20.90

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent product, 6 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Very sturdy and easy to assemble


Summer After The Funeral
Summer After The Funeral
Price: £5.69

3.0 out of 5 stars Jane Gardam is wonderful but this was not my favourite, 13 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I really enjoyed the opening chapters, the family characters and sense of period, but I seemed to fall out of love with it as I went along. Maybe the interest of the central character Athena waned for me? But I am looking forward to reading other Jane Gardam books. I highly recommend Queen of the Tambourine and A Long Way from Verona


Press Here
Press Here
by Herve Tullet
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £7.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple and brilliant, 6 Feb 2012
This review is from: Press Here (Hardcover)
This is a very clever and appealing book which really engages young children. The satisfyingly simple text and images are original and amusing. A great antidote for the attitude of 'it's only a book'.


I Want My Hat Back
I Want My Hat Back
by Jon Klassen
Edition: Hardcover

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stylish and funny, 28 Jan 2012
This review is from: I Want My Hat Back (Hardcover)
This is a wonderful book. It made me laugh out loud and not just on the first reading. The simple text and delightful graphic style are stylish and satisfying, and the story is hilarious, but also conveys depths of seething emotions. Tragi-comic genius! Exactly expresses the mindset of a passionate toddler, but will also appeal to adults.


Dubai (Lonely Planet City Guides)
Dubai (Lonely Planet City Guides)
by Andrea Schulte-Peevers
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars useful information but confusing layout, 1 Mar 2011
This guide is full of useful information but the layout makes it difficult to check things quickly or cross reference. The maps are also on a very small scale which isn't useful when you are actually sightseeing. Do be aware though if you are travelling to Dubai of the strict rules about taking drugs into UAE, including medicines which are legal here such as codeine and diazepam.


Two Caravans
Two Caravans
by Marina Lewycka
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Joyous, funny, sad, delightful, 19 Aug 2010
This review is from: Two Caravans (Hardcover)
I love this book. It is full of humour and humanity. The darker themes make their point but in the end love and the sheer wonder of life prevail. And the dog is brilliant - a stroke of genius that brings the whole story together.


The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life
The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life
by William Nicholson
Edition: Hardcover

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful insight into ordinary people, 30 May 2010
I thought this book was absolutely wonderful. It is so well written that you don't notice the writer's craft, and so humane and funny and tender. Brilliant portrait of marriage, loneliness and hope.


Unimagined: A Muslim Boy Meets the West
Unimagined: A Muslim Boy Meets the West
by Imran Ahmad
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny and honest, 30 Aug 2007
This is a great read, charting the pains and perils of adolesence and student days. Imran is blisteringly honest about his own shortcomings and often made me laugh out loud. The humour builds throughout, but underlying the coming-of-age theme is a deeper meditation about a sensitive boy's relationship with his God. Imran asks not only what it means in our society to be Muslim, but to be Christian, Jewish, or indeed of no faith. He touches on one of the most important questions of our age yet never loses his playful irony or sense of joy about life's adventure.


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