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C. J. Turner (London, UK)
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Key Words: Boxset
Key Words: Boxset
by William Murray
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Proof that sometimes the old ways are the best, 28 Nov. 2015
This review is from: Key Words: Boxset (Hardcover)
I have just heard my 3 1/2 year-old daughter read her first 20 pages after a couple of sessions learning to sight read the words in Book 1a, aided by the excellent flash cards that accompany the series. I couldn't be more proud. I have tried to interest her in phonics because I know this is what she will be taught at school, but she can't make words with it; with William Murray's keywords system, she can actually read and recognise words, and gets a huge sense of satisfaction about doing it. The books retain all of their old-world charm which I wouldn't want to see changed for anything. This system worked for me as a child and I'm so proud to see it working again for my children too. Timeless classics that should be in print - in this format - forever.


Into Thin Air: A personal account of the Everest disaster
Into Thin Air: A personal account of the Everest disaster
Price: £4.68

5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping Read, 4 May 2014
Although I have no interest in mountaineering, I found that I was utterly unable to put this book down and cannot remember when I last read a non-fiction book so quickly. Krakauer compellingly paints a picture of a landscape and environment so alien and hostile to most of us and combines this with an epic tale of survival and tragedy. The final postscript is a little tedious but otherwise this is a first-rate book that anybody could enjoy.


SAS: A Soldiers Perspective
SAS: A Soldiers Perspective
by Col. Thomas A. Hillary
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.95

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Semi-Literate Nonsense, 29 Dec. 2012
Even perusing the "Look Inside" section above, you can see that this book is utter tripe - badly written ("Many of the missions he has been involved in were a unique learning encounter designed to provide skills and insight through experience"), generic and without any real substance. RMA Sandhurst would be embarrassed if one of its proteges had produced this gibberish. It is entirely untrustworthy and smacks throughout as a work of pure fantasy. You will find no mention of a Col. Thomas Hillary anywhere. The author also states he was present at the Iranian Embassy siege of 1980, yet plenty of other detailed books written on the subject, by both soldiers and historians, have never mentioned him. Not a single university, company, group, charity or anything else he lists above has ever even mentioned him anywhere on the internet. No doubt the author would claim this was because of the "secrecy" of his profession - but then why would you publish and book and tout yourself out to companies if this was the case? How would they ever get in touch?

You can even see the author's fantasies in the blurb above - Author House are a self-publishing company (hence the wildly different prices between the Kindle version and the print copy), and RGS Fellowship is available for £93 per year, with no prior qualification required. The Expeditionary Advisory Centre also hasn't existed for 3 years now.

A load of utter poo. Avoid.


The Real History Behind Foyle's War
The Real History Behind Foyle's War
by Rod Green
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Bought as a Gift, 18 Mar. 2012
My dad is a massive fan of Foyle's War, and I bought this on a whim, because it was one of the only bits of Foyle's War merchandise that I could find. I expected it to be little more than a coffee table book, but what it manages to do is link the plots of the show to real-life issues of WW2, and also show an insight into how particular storylines from the programme were inspired. It contains hundreds of photos, both from the real war and the show, and covers a wide variety of subjects to do with the Home Front. Surprisingly detailed and informative - it hasn't left my dad's coffee table since Christmas, and I often see him picking it up for a browse. Well worth it for fans of the show.


A Fair Cop
A Fair Cop
Price: £2.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving Account of Injustice, 18 Mar. 2012
This review is from: A Fair Cop (Kindle Edition)
This is an eminently readable account of a police officer's treatment at the hands of the Criminal Justice system. Michael Bunting's writing is emotional and deeply moving - you can feel his fear and despair coming off of almost every page. The book clearly suggests that Bunting is innocent, and this book will leave you in no doubt as to the strength of his cause - it is passionately written, well-paced and - even if you don't believe in his innocence - will give you a horrifying look at the inside of two of Britain's so-called "soft" prisons.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 29, 2012 6:37 PM BST


Fashion Photography - A Pocket Tutorial
Fashion Photography - A Pocket Tutorial
Price: £2.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Concise and Useful, 4 Oct. 2011
I picked up some helpful hints and tips from this book, and it is well-pitched at the serious amateur or aspiring professional photographer. The author has a lot of useful information to impart, but I do wish it was slightly longer - it took me no more than 20 minutes to read from start to finish.


Our Man in Orlando: Murder, Madness and Mayhem in the Sunshine State.
Our Man in Orlando: Murder, Madness and Mayhem in the Sunshine State.
Price: £1.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not laugh out loud funny, but enjoyable, 25 Sept. 2011
Hugh Hunter's "Our Man in Orlando" is an account of his time as a British vice-consul in Orlando, Florida. Much of his time is spent visiting British prisoners in Florida jails, and the book consequently spends a lot of time talking about these individuals, their background and their crimes. There are fleeting glimpses of Hugh's personal life, and various accounts of barmy Foreign Office policy, which usually bears little resemblance to reality.

I found the book funny in places, but couldn't really say that it made me laugh enough to call this a "comedy" book. It's a good read, written in a very flowing style, but compared to other Monday Books offerings, I find it to be the weakest - simply because I didn't find the subject material all that interesting.


Serial Killers (True Crime Book 1)
Serial Killers (True Crime Book 1)
Price: £1.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Introduction, 25 Sept. 2011
Although dealing with a grim subject, this book is well-written and easy to read. It doesn't go into great detail about any particular killer, but it does provide an excellent overview of some of the most notorious serial killers in history - without any constraints of time period or nationality. Very good to dip in to, and provides a great introduction to individuals that you may then want to learn more about.


Map of Africa
Map of Africa
Price: £2.32

5.0 out of 5 stars The funniest military book, 24 Sept. 2011
This review is from: Map of Africa (Kindle Edition)
I saw all the other reviews praising this book as laugh-out-loud funny, but wondered if the were being overly generous. Let me tell you, they weren't. I had tears running down my cheeks in places, accompanied with howls of laughter when I was reading it on the tube. It's even funnier than the original - Eddy's tour of Belize alone is a classic.

It helps if you have some idea of military life, and if you don't, I highly recommend reading "Picking Up the Brass" first. It may seem like a crude book in many places, but it bears more resemblance to peacetime army life than any amount of Andy McNab books. A work of comedy genius.


A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 1)
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 1)
Price: £3.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest fantasy book I have ever read, 17 Jun. 2011
Game of Thrones is, simply, the greatest fantasy novel I have ever read. It isn't a complete story in itself - rather the first part in an epic saga - but, by God, by the end of this instalment, you'll be left breathless and craving more.

The characters and the world of Westeros are so brilliantly drawn and described, you can't help but feel completely immersed in the living, breathing land. This is not fantasy of monsters and wizards, but one of gritty high-medieval human stories. From the noble Eddard Stark, the drunken Robert Baratheon, the sinister Cersei Lannister to the "Kingslayer", Jaime, all the inhabitants of this world feel alive. Like real people, none of them are black and white - most are shades of grey, with believable motivations, desires and needs.

AGoT is not told from any singular viewpoint. Rather, each chapter is written from the perspective of one of the major characters. Each chapter advances the story (you do not hear about the same event 6 times over), but makes the book not about any one individual. This is a tale of Westeros, the fragile empire of the Seven Kingdoms and its perilous descent into chaos and war. It is an absolute masterpiece, and one of the greatest fantasy novels of all time.


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