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Chris Sampson "Sampson" (London, UK)

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QUACK SCIENCE & PUBLIC POLICY (Hobart Paper)
QUACK SCIENCE & PUBLIC POLICY (Hobart Paper)
by WHYTE J
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.30

0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Weak, 5 Nov 2013
I found this IEA publication very difficult to read, because almost every paragraph is flawed; sometimes logically, often evidentially and at times morally. The book takes what any undergrad might learn in Econ101 and applies it to current challenges and policy responses in health and climate change. All with gusto and arrogance. Whyte has little regard for the policy context, or for much of economic thought from the last 40 years. Most arguments depend on false analogies, which are painful to read. In the author's own words: "Science progresses by ignoring mere opinion, expert or otherwise". Thank goodness for that.


Dead Language
Dead Language
Price: 7.49

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As good as Cavalcade, 23 Oct 2013
This review is from: Dead Language (MP3 Download)
At first listen you may think that the new album from The Flatliners lacks the heat of their last, but in a few spins you'll realise that Dead Language lacks nothing. The variety of tempo and style demonstrated on Cavalcade is replaced by an assured step towards a more consistent and measured sound, which does cause the album to sag as we approach the climactic closers. Still, Chris's growl has developed into a roar and ensures that none of the tracks feel weak. The album hosts some of the band's best songs to date and I, for one, am relieved.


The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run or Ruin an Economy
The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run or Ruin an Economy
Price: 7.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Room for a follow-up, 23 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Tim Harford brings us some macro. For me, a less interesting topic than those of his previous books. Nevertheless, he's a great writer with a knack for simplifying tricky concepts and, as with his previous books, this is an enjoyable read. Harford only really dips his toe into the complexities of macroeconomics, but I was still able to gain a better perspective on the current debates; the different arguments being stripped - as far as possible - of the politics that envelop them. The book is exhaustively researched and the reader is treated to plenty of interesting factual and historical tidbits throughout.


The Humble Economist: Tony Culyer on Health, Health Care and Social Decision Making
The Humble Economist: Tony Culyer on Health, Health Care and Social Decision Making

4.0 out of 5 stars Valuable lessons, 17 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A collection of 21 abridged essays summarising Tony Culyer's most important contributions. Fellow health economists may have already read the book's constituent parts, but much can be gained from digesting them in this form. The book presents Culyer's work as a cohesive set of ideas, woven together in his unmistakable style and approach; best characterised by the book's title. For non-economists interested in health research, the book disarms economics of its alienating features that lead to confusion and misunderstanding about what economists actually do and why they do it. For economists, herein lies an exemplar approach to your discipline.


Never Again?: The Story of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 - A Study in Coalition Government and Policy Making
Never Again?: The Story of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 - A Study in Coalition Government and Policy Making
by Nicholas Timmins
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Not boring, 25 Sep 2013
I increasingly find politics a bore, even in relation to health and economic policy. Timmins's Never Again? precludes my usual reaction, providing a lucid and engaging narrative. The story guides us through the Act's conception, rejection, amendment and assent, identifying the key players from academia and Westminster along the way. The book enables you to leave your political inclinations at the door, and at times I found myself sympathising with Lansley! It also provides a nice overview of the ultimate nature of the Act at the end of its tumultuous journey; something I struggled to figure out at the time.


Always Whatever (A Collection of Songs from 2009-2012)
Always Whatever (A Collection of Songs from 2009-2012)
Price: 7.49

3.0 out of 5 stars Good collection of pop-punk songs, 13 Sep 2013
On this collection of unreleased or otherwise-unnoticed songs, Sundials demonstrate that 90s-rock-influenced punk bands needn't be boring. The band exhibits less of their indie college rock influence and instead brings the pop-punk; the homage to Alkaline Trio extending beyond the cover art. Their last album didn't do much for me, so I'm surprised how much I appreciate `Always Whatever'. You'll find the tracks worming their way into your head and providing the soundtrack to your day. Predictably the record doesn't flow as an album, but the tracks will be brightening up playlists for years to come.


Marrowbone Lane [Explicit]
Marrowbone Lane [Explicit]
Price: 5.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 7 Sep 2013
Chewing on Tinfoil aren't the first punk band in the last few years to graduate from ska beginnings, but Marrowbone Lane could make them a contender for the most successful transition (...The Flatliners?). It isn't just the Dublin accent that sets this band apart; their rhythm-driven punk style is relatively unique and succeeds in holding together a wide variety of styles and influences. The album swings from energetic punk rock to more sensible pop melodies and indie riffs, folky twangs and the occasional sing along chorus for good measure. Start to finish, there isn't a wasted track on here.


Les Miserables
Les Miserables
Price: 0.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinary, 4 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Les Miserables (Kindle Edition)
Society condemns the poor. But people can rise above their means and be vindicated by society. The premise of Les Misérables will never expire. The social ills of today differ only marginally from those of Hugo's epoch, and the story's pertinence will never wane. Hugo's writing is inspiring and poetic throughout. The descriptions of love - for one's child, one's sweetheart, one's freedom, one's country - are incredibly moving. Confronted with these 531,000 words, it certainly helps to be a bit of a Francophile with a general interest in history. Nevertheless, I challenge anyone not to be enlightened by this extraordinary book.


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