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Flyboys: A True Story of Courage
Flyboys: A True Story of Courage
by James Bradley
Edition: Hardcover

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Samurai Swords killed more people that Atom Bombs in WW2., 13 Sept. 2008
Flyboys is a book primarily about Gearge Bush's Navy flying days around Iwa Jima and its smaller sister island. It's much more, however, as it is a story of America's rise to dominant power in the world, and therefore goes back to the central issue of war; racial predudice. That issue has been best aregued by Niall Ferguson in his book War of the World".
Here the story of the U:S. in the 19th Century becoming great through ethnically cleansing their vast land. This forms a background to viewing what the Japanese were up to in the early 20th Century.A short history of both sides belief systems is explained. The Americans possessing a system involving humility and forgiveness from Christs work on the cross, the Japanese being of an entirely different order: the belief that the people of the land on which the sun first rises were a population of gods, led by a greater god, the Emperor.
This explains the books shocking descovery that biological weapons were indeed used in WW2, produced using live Chinese people, including women and childrn, as incubators for the deadly product, with the last drops of blood being squeezed out of them whilst they were still alive. The fact that this has remained a mystery for so long is explained that there were no official Japanese records (not surprisingly) to this biological weapons existence. Except one that is, where the wind changed direction when the weapon was being distributed routinely in China and 17,000 Japanese soldiers came to serious harm and death due to its effects.
This puts the equation involving atom bombs in perspective. At the time President Truman remarked that giving his presidential approval to the use of the bombs was one of the easiest decisions he ever had to make. Yet so many years later many see the dropping of them as the most evil acts in history. Here again, the book shows that probably the atom bombs were the only way the Japanese could commit themselves to surrender within their system of belief. Hirohito, one of the main instigators of WW2, was exonerated simply because he persuaded Tojo's government that now Japan had an honourable chance to surrende, because they were not surrendering to human beings (unthinkable for land-of-the-rising-sun-gods like the Japanese), but rather surrendering to an UNDEFEATABLE WEAPON.
The lesser known history of the U.S. led invasion fleet lying at anchour in nearby Okinawa is also described. This would have been used to bring an army more vast than that invading Europe at D-Day to attempt to overwhelm fanatical kamikaze resistance on the Japanese Island proper. Kamikaze, meaning Divine wind, amazingly did play the final scene in September 1945, when the greatest tropical wind for centuries did indeed wreck the American fleet whilst at rest in the Harbour!
The final word here comes from Leonard Cheshire VC, chosen to be the British observer in the B-29 that dropped the atom bomb against Nagasaki. He calculated that the dropping of the bomb was a terrible thing, but when you compare it with the totality of casualties, it's relatively small. If you divide the casualties, which is estimated at 55 million by the number of days of the entire Second World War, you get a Nagasaki on avaerage every two days of the war. Put simply: Samurai Swords killed more people that Atom Bombs in WW2.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 19, 2013 12:04 PM BST


Saving Private Ryan [DVD] [1998]
Saving Private Ryan [DVD] [1998]
Dvd ~ Tom Hanks
Price: £2.99

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SAVING Private Ryan, 13 Sept. 2008
Whatever you think of the story, the fact that one man is seen as so important that a relatively dangerous rescue mission is undertaken , involving ultimate sacrifice, the giving of ones life, to achieve the result. Surely this ist he greatest story ever told, that of Aslan in Narnia too, and Jesus Christ dying on a cross that an individual, namely YOU, can be brought home to safety. Tom Hanks' character, Saptain Miller does this ultimately in the film, and others do so along the way.
But there is more! The concept of grace is also dealt with in the film. Amidst all the anonymous killing, there comes out of the German ranks a gunner who Millers small band decide to release, rather than kill him on the spot. They are too small a force to take prisoners, so grace, an undeserved free gift of merit, is granted to the man, and he is told to walk away from them across a field. The story doesn't end there, as in the final tank battle scene, the SAME man has joined a rag-tag German unit and is now ernestly killing men from the group who earlier granted him his lfe and freedom!
This German has perhaps fallen from grace, as he has denied the freedom granted him, and continued as before. This is the other side of grace; when we have experienced forgiveness and freedom, we are obliged to live differently, out of deep thankfullness. This man should have sought to be like the pascifistic soldier in Miller/Ryans band who in the end is the one who (ironically) finishes this grace spurning mans life
Another more obvious element of Christian belief in the film is that of the cross-kissing sniper in Millers unit who prays reciting Psalm 23 as he zeros in on his intended victim, asking God to guide his hand. He may appear to many a contradiction, though not as much as if he had recited blessed bet he peacemakers..." instead. He ist he most clearly Christian character in the film, and clearly a Chritan who believes in the just war theory, and perhaps also the Protestant Work Ethic (although he appears to be Catholic) judging by the huge tally he works at chalking up. His works appear, however, not to be condoned or rewarded by the Lord Jesus Christ, as he is blown to smthereens attempting to take out a self propelled gun crew from the top of a church steeple (appropriately).
Saving Private Ryan has become the benchmark against which all other war films are measured, a must for a DVD collection. For Spielberg, only Schindlers List tops it.


On the Beach
On the Beach
by Nevil Shute Norway
Edition: Paperback

0 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Rearranging Deckchairs on the Titanic., 1 Sept. 2008
This review is from: On the Beach (Paperback)
Shutes books contain a readable style, but 50 years after most were written, they don't stand up to those who could fuse technical details with plausible relationships. This book, perhaps his best known on a account of the subject and film, seems quite thin be todays standards.
Like Day of the Triffids and other apocalyptic stories from that time, Shute's On the Beach concerns those who survived the (in this case) nuclear catastrophy and are waiting out deaths approach as the last remnant of humankind. The story's setting in Australia is crucial, as it seems the southern Hemisphere escaped the nuclear conflict completely. From then on the implausible nature of the situation takes a front seat, I'm afraid, with discussion of the previous conflict appearing over and over, but without much intelligent comment. At the very end it i sput forward that responsible newspapers could have saved humanity! Actually I have come to understand that this story is a parallel of the atheism that has overtaken the western world in the last 100 years.
The whole basis of the book is the line from a peom by T.S.Eliot which declares that the end of the world comes not witha bang, but a whimper. He ist he story of that whimper, and it seems it is acted out approriately enough by a load of whimps! Perhaps we know better no inout age of mass refugee movemnets, but to infer that everyone lays down to die, continuing there lives of quiet desparation up until that happens seems a large misjudgment of human nature. Surely people would be moving away from the airbourne gloom as it gathered towards them. Surely Eliot meant something else.
Here such themes as euthanasia and materialism abound, yet with a bittersweet conclusion. These days people would expect a nuclear conflict to result in terrible consequesences, but here life carries on much as normal, until the last day it seems, thenm a garden furniture shop is looted! So everyone carries on join quiet desparation almost as if nothing had happened. Everyting still functions as before! Yep, the Radio (we nearly all of us now know that nuclear explosions throw out massive electromagnetic fields and radiation to prevent radio communications functioning) still works fine, even recieving from the northern Hemisphere! Food, water and all other services are unaffected, it seems. Oh, sorry, to be quite correct the milk reserves are down in the last week, before the radiation cloud moves south to Melbourne and the central characters have to decide their style of death. Most of them are better preserved in alcohol, as their seem stob e plenty left and the scientist declares that drinking wards off the radiation effects somewhat!
The eminent scientist loves racing in his car, and not only wins the Australian (or is that the known worlds?) Grand Prix, but takes his cyanide tablet later in the drivers seat complete with Helmet and googles in place.
All the other characters likewise drop off this worlds plane in a domestic stupur, lacking any desire for survival. It is much like our generation in that sense, with people scorning any belief in a better world to come and living without any desire to seek such a world. At least you would expect them to use their resources to build shelters? No., they just let death creep up and take them, believing (even the ones who confusingly attend church- surely the Christian message is a contradiction to such circumstances?) death is the end.


The Lost Ark of the Covenant: The Remarkable Quest for the Legendary Ark
The Lost Ark of the Covenant: The Remarkable Quest for the Legendary Ark
by Tudor Parfitt
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Raiders of the Redundant Ark, 1 Sept. 2008
Everyone knows about Indiana Jones, and Tudor Parfitt, a professor of Jewish studies is a pretender to Jones' throne. At least the book is written with minimal academic slant, and wierd characters who mostly drink too much, including the author, create a racey read.The whole story is padded out with mini-narratives of the professors aquaintances along the path of finding the elusive lost Ark of the Covenant. Sadly, the professor has only an academic interest in the story of the Ark and he makes a fundamental error in analysing what he thinks the Ark of the Covenant was. From that error are many errors multiplied which caused me to think he could no longer see the wood fort he trees.
Parfitt spends endless chapters circling aroung the meaning of the word ark", which is a box in Hebrew like Noahs ark, but the idea of a drum i sput forward, and then developed as the authopr travels through East Africa, to a crescendo of mis-analysis when he arrives at the theory that the Ark of the Covenant was a magic drum!
What I find such a waste in this analysis is that the man completely misses and ignores the more important word:"Covenant". His conclusion, based on his ignorance of God, ist hat the Ark of the Covenant held magical power because of the magic objects placed within it. The tablets of Moses along with the budding staff of Aaron are the magic" objects. What is much more interesting is another professors work that is described in some detail. That is the genetic analysis of various Jewish priests (cohanim) which showed positively that an extraordinary number were descended form a single, common male ancestor who lived around 3000 years ago. It is reasonable then to assume that this distant common ancestor could have been Aaron, the brother of Moses who lioved at this time and was the founder of the priesthood. Exactly as the Bible describes.
Once again, Prof.Parfitt goes off into sceptical ranting concerning a covenant of everlasting priesthood" in which he decides that the fact that the Levitical priesthood was kept pure and a remnant of which exists to this day, must mean everlasting". This ist he crux of his faulty thinking. The Ark of the Covenant was not a drum/weapon as he supposes, but part of the story of God's revealing himself to human beings. Many academic and non-academic people understand that the Ark carried the instruments of Gods Covenant and it was Gods power, not magical power, that killed Uzziah who touched itas he steadied the cart and inflicted tumors on the Philistines when they captured it in battle.
For Parfitt, the discovery of the Ark would be a world shattering event because of its historical and political significance. Another of the books mini-narratives concerns muslims and jews becoming reconciled, and once again the professor believes his discovery will help in that too. Once again he missest he point that the Ark part of the Covenant is redundant because of the new covenant through Jesus Christ. In a sense the Ark being lost was a sign that Gods new covenant could be made.
Finally, the absurdity of his misinterpretation comes in the last revelation that what he found (strangely residing in a museum warehouse sounding again reminiscent of the Harrison Ford film) is not even the original Ark! It is an African tribal copy of the thing, no older than 700 years.
The world shattering event has long arrived, and that happened 2000 years ago in the person of Jesus Christ establishing a new covenant.


The Root of the Righteous
The Root of the Righteous
by A W Tozer
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Will there ever ba another Tozer?, 6 Aug. 2008
Tozer was a prophet strongly motivated to bring reform to the Body of Christ. He is in the tradition , so to say, of William Law and others who can only be described as strong meat. Even John Wesley couldn't agree with everything that Law wrote about the inner life and devotion to God. Tozer is very sinmilar, even the most dedicated disciples of Jesus Christ will be unable to agree with everything that Tozer writes. He was also a product of his time. The 1950's brought the beginnings of rapid change in America, and it seems that Tozer was protesting, not so much against the change as the Christians getting sucked into that change.
Therefore such vices as Hollywood films and theatre in church is heavily frown upon, to a degree that most believers would be unble to stomach. Fifty years later it seems Tozer wasn'too far off course, however, in his warnings. Now we live in an age where the world dictates to the church what to believe and even preach upon (yes, some denominations have outlawed preaching on hell for starters, and that is just the beginning of a long list that the world forbids), and the church is no longer the head. This vision of the Church being the head and not the tail, bringing salt and light to a decaying and dark world is Tozers central theme. Being rooted in Jesus Christ is the key, and the thrust of this book is to tear apart everything that prevents Jesus' followers from being continually rooted in Him. It is clear that the world would be effected if this happened, and Tozer brings examples from fifty years before his writings to demonstrate how movements of God are not recognised or go off course when leaders are not rooted to become the righteous. Actually everyone is included in this book, with a broad sweep confronting every false notion. His defeat of atheism is peotic and forceful:
You had no say about the time or place of your birth; God determines that without consulting the person. One day the little man finds himself in consciousness and accepts the fact that he is. There his volitional life begins. Before that he had nothing to say about anything. After that he struts and boasts and utters his defiant proclamations of individual freedom, and encouraged by the sound of his own voice he may declare his independence of God and call himself an "atheist". Have your fun, little man; you are only chattering in the interim between first and last; you had no voice at the first and you will have none at the last. God reserves the right to take up at the last where He began at the first, and you are in the hands of God whether you will or not.
This knowledge should humble us and encourage us , too. It should humble us when we remember how frail we are, how utterly dependent upon God. Tozer was able to show the meaning of true worship. It's not in singing, but in the silencetaht occurs afterwards. How churches have missed this again and again is evident to most. Will there be one as strong as Tozer raised up again?


Root of the Righteous Tozer (Tozer Classics Series)
Root of the Righteous Tozer (Tozer Classics Series)
by A W Tozer
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Prophet of His time., 6 Aug. 2008
Tozer was a prophet strongly motivated to bring reform to the Body of Christ. He is in the tradition , so to say, of William Law and others who can only be described as strong meat. Even John Wesley couldn't agree with everything that Law wrote about the inner life and devotion to God. Tozer is very sinmilar, even the most dedicated disciples of Jesus Christ will be unable to agree with everything that Tozer writes. He was also a product of his time. The 1950's brought the beginnings of rapid change in America, and it seems that Tozer was protesting, not so much against the change as the Christians getting sucked into that change.
Therefore such vices as Hollywood films and theatre in church is heavily frown upon, to a degree that most believers would be unble to stomach. Fifty years later it seems Tozer wasn'too far off course, however, in his warnings. Now we live in an age where the world dictates to the church what to believe and even preach upon (yes, some denominations have outlawed preaching on hell for starters, and that is just the beginning of a long list that the world forbids), and the church is no longer the head. This vision of the Church being the head and not the tail, bringing salt and light to a decaying and dark world is Tozers central theme. Being rooted in Jesus Christ is the key, and the thrust of this book is to tear apart everything that prevents Jesus' followers from being continually rooted in Him. It is clear that the world would be effected if this happened, and Tozer brings examples from fifty years before his writings to demonstrate how movements of God are not recognised or go off course when leaders are not rooted to become the righteous. Actually everyone is included in this book, with a broad sweep confronting every false notion. His defeat of atheism is peotic and forceful:
You had no say about the time or place of your birth; God determines that without consulting the person. One day the little man finds himself in consciousness and accepts the fact that he is. There his volitional life begins. Before that he had nothing to say about anything. After that he struts and boasts and utters his defiant proclamations of individual freedom, and encouraged by the sound of his own voice he may declare his independence of God and call himself an "atheist". Have your fun, little man; you are only chattering in the interim between first and last; you had no voice at the first and you will have none at the last. God reserves the right to take up at the last where He began at the first, and you are in the hands of God whether you will or not.
This knowledge should humble us and encourage us , too. It should humble us when we remember how frail we are, how utterly dependent upon God. Tozer was able to show the meaning of true worship. It's not in singing, but in the silencetaht occurs afterwards. How churches have missed this again and again is evident to most. Will there be one as strong as Tozer raised up again?


Seeing Gray in a World of Black and White: Thoughts on Religion, Morality and Politics
Seeing Gray in a World of Black and White: Thoughts on Religion, Morality and Politics
by Adam Hamilton
Edition: Hardcover

3.0 out of 5 stars We are Normal and we want our freedom., 16 Jun. 2008
Hamilton has been hailed as writing on the level of Bill Hybels, Rick Warren or even Jim Wallis (who writes the forward). I feel this book is written out of frustration against the excesses of Christian fundamentalists in America, but the antidote presented is chosen from the limited range of political positions in the USA. It seems that Christians in the west stopped believing in hell a generation ago, and much of the writing flows from uncertaintiies about what ist rue in the Bible and what is only figurative. We are confusingly informed that plucking out your eye if it causes you to sin is only meant figuratively to show how serious sin is, but no effort is made to clarify just WHY sin is serious (surely it does have something to do with the horror of hell). I am guessing that the author is not widely travelled, as all the arguments begin and end in America. It amused me to read the comparison about how generous" the Danish Government is compared to that of the USA - without any mention of the high tax system in Denmark that causes all giving to be undertaken by the Government rather than individuals (whereas the system is the opposite for Americans, who are still the most generous individual givers).
In saying that, the information is helpful and occasionally accurate. Some chapters are just what is needed in the frictional arguments that generate only heat and no light. The old chestnuts of evolution versus creation is full of the postitions that most take. Hamilton gives his own postion on most subjects here, including the draft of 2 sermons. The chapter on abortion is actually an outstanding piece of work, only because he is candid about the fact that his own mother was under immense pressure to have an abortion before his own birth. A moving letter penned by her hand is included. The political agenda is laid out in anticipation, and with notes about, the up coming election. Christians in America can be better informed after reading this book, because Hamilton encourages people to get politically involved, as he indeed is as a pastor of a church of 14,000. A few times he notes that people have left the church because of his position on homosexual behaviour, or war in Iraq. Mostly people have stayed with him though. His dream is to forge a Radical Centre" to counter the extremes of Liberal or Conservative Christianity in the States. I don't find the teachings of Jesus standing in this centre.
Whether I would leave his church for that reason is unlikely, though I am disappointed in his conclusions (or lack of them). I also found a contradiction in his thinking. The author lays out his strongly rooted Methodist decison making style: basically the authority of the Bible as God's word and the Holy Spirits leading stand before human reasoning every time. This is clearly not what is presented in the book; reasoning comes to the for, making Gods word follow up in apparently last place. For me, the answers gain clarity in the light of Gods word rather than reaction to secular society. The chapter on Homosexuality demonstrates this most.
Firstly, I am wary of a Christian using the word homosexuality" and then pulling out the 7 references to homosexual acts that are mentioned in the entire Bible. My disappointmnet her eis that the word homosexuality" (just as the word heterosexuality")is a very recent word, communicating the idea of ones sexuality as ones identity. This is very far from what is in the Bible, where homosexual acts are condemned. One of the verses quoted states that God hates such acts, yet the author knows practicing homosexuals who claim to love God. Some of the same sentiments are expressed towards non-Christian forms of worship. Strangely, the author presents a different standard for those who call themselves homosexual, standing in the middle ground of the absurd debate about homosexual marriage. Again, this argument is centred in America, and I could not imagine any Christian in Africa for example grasping what he means. Oddly, the plight of unmarried people and their heterosexuality" is not discussed. A thought about Hollywood movies setting a precedent in sexual behaviour is tossed out, but that seems to be a passive form of Christian faith rather than the salt and light" that is advocated at the end of the book. Personally, I have found the most help from two other american authors on this subject, Leanne Payne and Neil Anderson.
There again confusion sets in. America as a political nation is called to be salt and light on the worlds political stage. the patriotism found in America causes this opinion to be dearly held there, and yet it seems at odds to Jesus Christs commandments, which are entirely aimed at a personal relationship to God and our neighbour. The fragile self image that most Americans now possess because of recent (and not so recent) events is discussed. This is again in my mind a distraction to following Jesus Christ as Lord. I think that Americans alone in the world carry this burden of felt responsibility, probaly because of their role of world policeman. This concept is not discussed, but it would have brought clarity to the most confusing end chapters about just war and electing a president. The very same arguments used as to why war in Iraq was wrong would stand for Vietnam too, not to mention Korea. Hitler and World War 2 get mutiple mentions because that particular war is seen as just as well as triumphant. The reason justifying Americas participation ist hat Hitler was killing his own people. Oddly, Japan is not even mentioned, yet Saddams killing of his own people is! Americas darker history is also left unsaid: the native Indians and the Phillipines form 2 silent examples.
I was astounded by his lack of historical understanding. Hitler is referred to as holding a version of Christianity(!) and the final Solution" is reported here as coming to light before World War 2 began. It was first announced in 1942; and we can thank God that by then even America had started at last to do something to Stop Hitler!
I think the author wants to be seen as patriotic (is there any other stance available in the USA?), but has made the usual error that Americans make of confusing personal faith with his nations identity. Surely the truth is that America is as power and wealth hungry as all the other nations? Proverbs states that righteousness exalts a nation", but this verse doesn't feature in this book, though many other helpful Bible verses do. More books will surely be forthcoming, the world of genetic engineering hasn't even be mentioned here, and Hamilton is a pastor full of obvious compassion. It is that huge compassionate and soft heart that takes the lead in his reasoning, with the Bible and truth taking the back seat.


Why Not Catch-21?: The Stories Behind the Titles
Why Not Catch-21?: The Stories Behind the Titles
by Gary Dexter
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Why Not Catch Him?, 30 Jan. 2008
The title should be why not Catch 18, as it is made clear that that was the number chosen by Heller as a title up until the publisher with deeper thinking and subtlty gave us the title which became a well known (and according to Heller) misused phrase. That is one of the high points of this ragtag colllection of titular explanantions. One should ask: Why not Lord of the Hobbits? or Catcher in the Maize? These books however, are not included. What is her eis only that which has a story behind it. At least a partly verifiable story.
It is a mine of (useless) information. The pseudonymes of the 3 Bronte sisters and their first book of published poems and when they died, and some of their influences are all to be found in one chapter. Then there is Moby Dick and the first Sherlock Holmes story, stolen from Edgar Allen Poe; perhaps? Tnhere is, unlike sherlock Holmes, lots of conjecture and little in the way of facts for most of the chapters, except C.S.Lewis, one of the greatest minds of the 20th Century and accountable about his written works. He answers a young enquirers question about Aslan in this way:
Has there never been anyone in this world who(1.) Arrived at the same time as Father Christmas.(2.) Said he was the son of the Great Emperor.(3.) Gave himself up for someone else's fault to be jeered at and killed by wicked people.(4.) Came to life again.(5.) Is sometimes spoken of as a lamb (see the end of the Dawn Treader). Don't you really know His name in this world. Think it over and let me know the answer!
Then there is Marie Stopes's book about married sex. It turns out that she would have been appalled that her name is now attached to abortion clinics and the rights of homosexuals. All very interesting though.
Finally, the banality of most of the stories is amusing. A clockwork Orange was probably derived from nothing more subversive that a Terry's Chocolate Orange!


VFR 3 Photographic Scenery - Wales and South West England (add on for Flight Sim 2002)
VFR 3 Photographic Scenery - Wales and South West England (add on for Flight Sim 2002)
Offered by marxwax
Price: £3.26

5.0 out of 5 stars Fly the Photo real thing., 14 Nov. 2007
I got FS2002 because of these add-ons! Its Visual Flight Rules all the way, giving that yellow glider a new lease of life. Generally you want to stay slow as to go too fast means missing some extraordinary sights. What some see as flaws I see as pluses. Yes, there are no trees or other autogen, but since this is SO precise, any FS tree would look out of place, as sometimes there just is a large oak in the middle of a field alone. When the sun goes down, it could well be time to land and stop your VFR flight (as in reality), since the only ground lighting is the airport approaches. Still, could be good for flying a Lancaster bomber back to a blacked out landscape, that wouldn't normally be there in FS2002/4. Whats more, you actually get ALL the airfields/airports and farm strips in England(or Wales) since EVERYTHING is there. Those farm strips can be notoriously difficult to find, and that is exactly simulated here; you simply need to discern the strip amongst the mass of other fields.
Then again you might want to dive-bomb your house/school/Granny's house etc, and here you really feel like you are. I tried some aerobatics over Edgbaston reservoir and the plane ended up in the reservoir! Okay the towers of Birmingham didn't surround me, but it is even possible to place downloaded scenery over this too. I even like the joins! They seem to match pretty well in late summer/autumn. That means you can start at somewhere with autogen trees, and get up to 4000ft over the photorealistic territory, then descend low over the trees and houses. Actually the autogen houses in FS2002 only look like houses I have seen in Albania, so this add-on makes up for that too, with English semis, stately homes (such as Longleat where air races happen in the grounds) and Cathedrals and other houses of worship which are normally missing. Actually EVERYTHING that you can see from the air is here, and that includes all the disused airfields (mostly with crops between the tarmac now) which gives interesting historical posibilities.
Finally the hills round it all off. The higher the hills the more stunning the terramesh looks, so Wales is astounding, and even Cornwall allows a covincuing low flight along the deep sided estuaries. Okay, the cliffs are not exact, but they have played it safe to stop the sea becoming a vertical face. The sea lighting effects also still function, and since there is also a bit of coast, it also looks dazzling. Almost miraculously, some of the photo lakes fit with this effect in a tantalizing sea of reflection. There are also a few wisps of cloud which look like gorse fies to add even more interest.It's so subtle, because there are even cloud shaows over the fields too, so make sure to put clouds in the scky set-up. Then there are the planes lined up at big airports, most enjaoyable are the RAF musuems collection of Bombers and Transports at Cosford, and the Airbuses at Filton. In that sense it covers the application in FS2002/4 which I always thought was missing : performing at an airshow, over an aeroplane crowded runway.


VFR 2 Photographic Scenery - Central and Southern England (add on for Flight Sim 2002)
VFR 2 Photographic Scenery - Central and Southern England (add on for Flight Sim 2002)
Offered by scaddingk
Price: £2.88

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars scenic airway, 13 Nov. 2007
I got FS2002 because of these add-ons! Its Visual Flight Rules all the way, giving that yellow glider a new lease of life. Generally you want to stay slow as to go too fast means missing some extraordinary sights. What some see as flaws I see as pluses. Yes, there are no trees or other autogen, but since this is SO precise, any FS tree would look out of place, as sometimes there just is a large oak in the middle of a field alone. When the sun goes down, it could well be time to land and stop your VFR flight (as in reality), since the only ground lighting is the airport approaches. Still, could be good for flying a Lancaster bomber back to a blacked out landscape, that wouldn't normally be there in FS2002/4. Whats more, you actually get ALL the airfields/airports and farm strips in England(or Wales) since EVERYTHING is there. Those farm strips can be notoriously difficult to find, and that is exactly simulated here; you simply need to discern the strip amongst the mass of other fields.
Then again you might want to dive-bomb your house/school/Granny's house etc, and here you really feel like you are. I tried some aerobatics over Edgbaston reservoir and i ended up in the reservoir! Okay the towers of Birmingham didn't surround me, but it is even possible to place downloaded scenery over this too. I even like the joins! They seem to match pretty well in late summer/autumn. That means you can start at somewhere with autogen trees, and get up to 4000ft over the photorealistic territory, then descend low over the trees and houses. Actually the autogen houses in FS2002 only look like houses I have seen in Albania, so this add-on makes up for that too, with English semis, stately homes (such as Longleat where air races happen in the grounds) and Cathedrals and other houses of worship which are normally missing.
Finally the hills round it all off. The higher the hills the more stunning the terramesh looks, so Wales is astounding, and even Cornwall allows a covincuing low flight along the deep sided estuaries. Okay, the cliffs are not exact, but they have played it safe to stop the see becoming a vertical face. The sea lighting effects also still function, and since there is also a bit of coast, it also looks dazzling. Almost miraculously, some of the photo lakes fit with this effect in a tantalizing sea of reflection. There are also a few wisps of cloud which look like gorse fies to add even more interest. Then there are the planes lined up at big airports, most enjaoyable are the RAF musuems collection of Bombers and Transports at Cosford, and the Airbuses at Filton. In that sense it covers the application in FS2002/4 which I always thought was missing : performing at an airshow, over an aeroplane crowded runway.


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