Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now
Profile for TimBall > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by TimBall
Top Reviewer Ranking: 51,662
Helpful Votes: 177

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
TimBall "Hungry for the Truth" (Preston,Lancs, UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
pixel
Camera Armor for Canon EOS 40D - Black
Camera Armor for Canon EOS 40D - Black

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Chinks in the Armor!, 24 July 2010
I've used Camera Armor for the 5D for a couple of years and really appreciate the protection it gives, despite making lens changing a bit awkward.
However, the one place I find I need the protection most is just where this 40D version is lacking, (and for all cameras with a built in flash), ie, over the viewfinder/flash housing!
I'm still going to use it but I wish some kind of "flap" arrangement was provided for this most vulnerable area.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 10, 2011 12:57 PM GMT


1 and 2 Chronicles (NIV Application Commentary)
1 and 2 Chronicles (NIV Application Commentary)
by Andrew E. Hill
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.50

4.0 out of 5 stars Narrative style Commentary, 8 July 2010
Very well written but only 4 stars because of the structure of the commentary.
I am not meaning the 3 part structure that the series is arranged in but the specific structure of this commentary.
It seems rather strange that the author has chosen to cover the first 9 chapters of the book, the "lists", in great detail, in 10 chapters of commentary.
Then the following chapters are written in a more narrative style, covering several chapters at a time (up to 12 together), per chapter of the commentary.
Unlike other commentaries in this series, the author doesn't appear to run out of space before the end, as the final chapters of 2 Chronicles are covered in detail.


Discipleship on the Edge: An Expository Journey Through the Book of Revelation
Discipleship on the Edge: An Expository Journey Through the Book of Revelation
by Darrell W. Johnson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £20.80

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 23 April 2010
I love this book! Even though there is much I agree to differ with in his interpretation of the symbols and images, his drawing out of the underlying meaning and its implications are brilliant.
No other Commentary on The Revelation that I have come across, is so practical or so challenging.

This is definitely not a Dispensational view of the Church being raptured out of the world by Chapter 4 of The Revelation, nor is it a premillenial view, but it is all about the role of the Churches witness for Jesus in the face of violent opposition by the world.

My only real disappointment with this book is his Replacement Theology teaching, that the church has fully and completely replaced Israel.

However, even with this caveat, I still find it worthy of a 5 star award.

Whatever tradition you hold too, I believe that the message of this book will be of benefit to you.


1 and 2 Samuel (NIV Application Commentary)
1 and 2 Samuel (NIV Application Commentary)
by Bill T. Arnold
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best in Series, 7 April 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I would give Arnold's treatment of 1 Samuel a definite 5 star rating, whilst only a 4 1/2 star for 2 Samuel.
As so often in this series, the author seems to be under a length constraint which becomes more and more apparent towards the end. For instance, the 31 chapters of 1 Samuel are covered in 32 sections, whereas the 24 chapters of 2 Samuel are covered in only 11 sections. However, this isn't quite as pronounced as the figures suggest, as the longer sections are given slightly longer treatments.
Each section of 1 Samuel is covered so well and in such depth though, that the contrast with the treatment of 2 Samuel does disappoint slightly.
I am reviewing this as an intermediate level commentary which is written in a narrative style which I find lends itself to devotional use.
The Commentary is written from a Conservative Evangelical viewpoint, and although critical scholarship is mentioned it never becomes obtrusive.

Highly recommended.


1 & 2 Kings (NIV Application Commentary)
1 & 2 Kings (NIV Application Commentary)
by August H. Konkel
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed (3 1/2 star), 7 April 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I wish I had bought the higher rated 1 & 2 Kings commentary, (BestCommentaries.com) by Paul House, NAC, instead of this commentary by August Konkel. I didn't because I generally prefer the NIV Application Commentary format for devotional reading.
This commentary is fairly basic. Whilst generally Conservative, I feel he gives too much precedence to the theoretical Deuteronomist viewpoint, which I find can detract from the original intent of the message of the text.
The "Original Meaning" sections are basic with slightly more reflection on the meaning of the passage in the "Bridging Contexts" sections. The "Contempory Significance" sections are used as a series of "essays" on contempory issues facing the western church, which whilst often good in themselves, did not always seem very relevant to the passage under discussion.

The author generally takes very large chunks of 2, 3 or even 4 chapters in length for each section. This isn't always a bad thing as it sometimes helps to show an underlying theme which can be hidden by chapter divisions but I found the "chunks" were usually too large to cover in any very meaningful depth.

I read this alongside Dale Ralph Davis's excellent (5 star) commentaries in the Christian Focus series and the contrast was striking.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 6, 2013 7:11 PM BST


Morphy Richards 48281 Fastbake Breadmaker
Morphy Richards 48281 Fastbake Breadmaker
Price: £59.99

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great, until......! (Model 48285), 8 Mar. 2010
I have been making a small size Granary loaf every five days for four years with my Morphy Richard Fastbake Breadmaker. (Best with Allinson Dried yeast and Flour.)
The results were REALLY good. Good rise, moist, open, domed loaf.........until about six months ago.
Suddenly, no matter whether using Hovis, Allinsons or Dove's Nest flour and whatever yeast I try, the results all fail to rise fully AND always crater.
I imagine the timer and/or thermostat isn't operating correctly.

As wholewheat loaves were always very dense with this machine, I have decided to change to a Panasonic model.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 20, 2012 11:45 AM GMT


Why Does God Allow Natural Disasters?
Why Does God Allow Natural Disasters?
by David Pawson
Edition: Paperback

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well done David! "Mr Valiant for the Truth", 5 Feb. 2010
At last! A book that doesn't try to defend God. God's love is not the sentimental "pap" that nearly every Evangelist and Pastor is preaching nowadays.
God's love sent His Only Beloved Son to The Cross!
We need to get back to the "Gospel of Righteousness" that the Bible (and David Pawson) teaches.
David poses the question," If God is all-powerful and all-loving, then how can such things happen in which there is so much suffering?", then he seeks to answer that from Scripture.
He doesn't tell us, "Natural Disasters are a complete mystery that we will never understand", he doesn't answer it, "God allows them for the good they bring out in some of us, (not all, eg Child traffickers!)", nor does he say, "God therefore can't be all-poweful if he doesn't prevent them." What he does say is,....... ," well read it for yourself and find out what he shows us Scripture teaches on this subject, if we are willing to accept it and get a more realistic picture of what God's Goodness is really about.
I can only say it came the closest to satisfying me on this question, like no other I've read, and I've read a fair few.


Israel in the New Testament
Israel in the New Testament
by David Pawson
Edition: Paperback

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Valiant for the Truth", 5 Feb. 2010
I wholeheartedly concur with the reviewer of another of David's books, who said, "David Pawson has a way of writing that makes complex subjects seem easy to understand, and this book is a good example of his ability." It is so readable.
"Israel in the New Testament" is a survey of Israel through Matthew, Acts, Romans, Hebrews and Revelation.
It was written both as a counter to "Replacement Theology", and to the criticism that those who believe that God still has a purpose for the people and place of Israel, give greater emphasis to the Old Testament than the New.
It was originally given as a series of annual talks, in Jerusalem, at the Feast of Tabernacles.
Chapter 3, "Israel in Romans", alone, is worth getting this book for. Masterly and SO accessible, with non of the "ascerbic polemic" he is accused of by several reviewers of his, "Defending Christian Zionism".
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 16, 2011 5:23 PM GMT


Leviticus: 3 (Communicator's Commentary: Old Testament)
Leviticus: 3 (Communicator's Commentary: Old Testament)
by Gary W. Demarest
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best "Simple" Commentary on Leviticus., 12 Sept. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The first Commentary I tried on Leviticus was by Andrew Bonar in the Geneva Series by Banner of Truth. Despite excellent reviews, I gave up about 2/3 of the way through because of the dated and prosy style of writing, (it was written in 1846). Since then I have been looking for a simple yet thorough commentary on this book, especially for devotional reading. This volume ticked most of the boxes. I actually found myself enjoying a Commentary on Leviticus! It is very readable. Another plus is the inclusion of the full biblical text,(NKJV). Sadly it suffers from the problem common to so many commentaries I have read, of ending with a "sprint finish". Chapter 26, Blessings and Curses, which is possibly one of the most fascinating in the book and about which much could surely be written in its outworking in the subsequent history of Israel, was covered in under 4 pages!
Overall though, I rate it highly for this level of commentary. It was so good that I was sorry to finish and wished that the author had been given more space for more detail throughout.


Exodus (NIV Application Commentary)
Exodus (NIV Application Commentary)
by Peter E. Enns
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £25.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Left wanting more...., 4 Sept. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As with the first volume in this series, there is a strong sense that the author was writing to a strict size constraint. The intro and first 25 Chapters are given 505pages, whilst the last 15 chapters are barely covered in only 94 pages, (including the Tabernacle, the Priesthood, the Golden Calf episode and Moses intercession and "seeing" God.) As the 94 pages include the full NIV text, the Original Meaning, Bridging Contexts AND Contempory Significance sections, it felt VERY abbreviated.
This isn't to say this is a poor Commentary, it isn't but it could have been SO much better given more space and detail.(It wouldn't have been given a rating of "7" by "BestComms" if it had been poor.)

I have read six others in this series so far, (Genesis, Isaiah, Matthew, Mark, Acts and Romans), and rate them all highly as intro/intermediate level Commentaries.
This is the first one where I agree with the common criticism of the series, that the "Original Meaning" section is too light. However, on the plus side, I found this to have the best "Bridging Context" section. The first one to make real use of this section as I think the publishers intended it to be. Also it is written in an easy to read, narrative style, (as they all have been.)
There is a strong emphasis that Jesus has replaced Israel, as the "New Israel", which I haven't found in this series before.

Where the meaning of a passage is uncertain, or where there are several views held, (which is often), rather than giving the possible alternatives, the author prefers not to enter into ANY kind of "speculation", which means too many subjects aren't even discussed. I found this unsatisfactory.
In conclusion, fairly good, (just 4*), but not great.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5