Profile for Robert > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Robert
Top Reviewer Ranking: 30,905
Helpful Votes: 858

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Robert (Uxbridge, United Kingdom)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
SAMRICK - Amazon Kindle Paperwhite & Kindle Paperwhite 3G - Frost Hydro Gel Protective Case - Blue
SAMRICK - Amazon Kindle Paperwhite & Kindle Paperwhite 3G - Frost Hydro Gel Protective Case - Blue

5.0 out of 5 stars Came fast and fits first time, 14 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought the blue paperwhite gel cover. It came within 48 hours and there was no forcing to get it on.


The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change
by Charles Duhigg
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mildly interesting but not really worth the money, 29 Mar 2013
First of all, this is not a how-to book. Although lessons can be learned and methods derived from the content, this book does not give a lot away in terms of tips and tricks.

The book is in three parts. Individual habits, group or organisational, and societal habits. Most readers will have interest in only the first. So that is a large chunk of the book not read. The content is mostly not new and can be found on blogs, articles or wikipedia. The author has gone to the trouble of consolidating it and making the style accessible and so deserves credit for that.

If this book was going for a the price of a latte it would be pitched about right. It is probably best to wait until that happens.


Jack Glass (Golden Age)
Jack Glass (Golden Age)
by Adam Roberts
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 12.04

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed bag - some good some bad, 15 Mar 2013
This book is three stories about Jack Glass, a wanted criminal in a future solar system where a draconian oligarchy rules the space-ways. Glass is rumored to be a terrorist and is certainly anti-authority. He believes that his survival is vital to the survival of the species. And so he has to commit a series of murders. The first tale is of seven convicts marooned on an asteroid and what they will do to survive. One of the convicts is Glass, and what will he do to survive? The second and third tales are linked with the same characters and lead to a chase across the solar system, from Earth to space habitat. The second tale was an Agatha Christie style whodunnit. Deliberately so, and was probably the more interesting of the to because it introduced the nobility of the future. The third was a chase story and was a bit of a bore.


Another War
Another War
by Simon Morden
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.35

3.0 out of 5 stars Not a bad Return of John Wyndham, 7 Mar 2013
This review is from: Another War (Paperback)
A country manor house in Oxfordshire has reappeared after almost a century. The two inhabitants are a wounded veteran of the first world war and one of his workers. A small army unit attached to the the nuclear warfare plant nearby is dispatched to secure the area and penetrate the force field around the house. The story was great and I enjoyed it. It did read very much like John Wyndham and felt like an earlier tale from Simon Morden (who also wrote the very readable Metrozone novels). But it was enjoyable.


Degrees Of Freedom: Metrozone Book 3 (Samuil Petrovitch Novels)
Degrees Of Freedom: Metrozone Book 3 (Samuil Petrovitch Novels)
by Simon Morden
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.76

4.0 out of 5 stars Very Readable, 7 Mar 2013
Simon Morden's books about refugee physics genius and unwilling revolutionary Petrovich are very readable. I read this one in one sitting having enjoyed the previous two. There is a danger, for the author, that creating a character who is a genius hacker and has access to a super powerful AI leads to a book where all problems are solved by technological magic. However the author has escaped this by having equally interesting characters around Petrovich and by making the protagonist quite annoying. There is still a little wish fulfillment in giving a right wing US President a spanking. But since we all want to do that anyway it was just fun.


Theories Of Flight: Metrozone Book 2 (Samuil Petrovitch Novels)
Theories Of Flight: Metrozone Book 2 (Samuil Petrovitch Novels)
by Simon Morden
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

3.0 out of 5 stars We're out of explosives and only have theoretical physics left, 5 Mar 2013
Still and enjoyable read, Theories of flight has Petrovich become a physics celbrity. But he is concerned about someone trapped in the East End of London and sets out to the rescue. However the Outies from beyond the M25 are invading and he is likely to be lost without the help of some special allies. A good romp although a little predictable. It is problematic to write too much power or control into a character because the character gets lost in the power. That almost happens in this novel, although since Petrovich is a sympathetic refugee from St Petersburg the reader sticks with the book until the 'I have the one ring' phase passes.


Equations Of Life: Metrozone Book 1 (Samuil Petrovitch Novels)
Equations Of Life: Metrozone Book 1 (Samuil Petrovitch Novels)
by Simon Morden
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.66

4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable romp across a dystopian future, 5 Mar 2013
I don't much like post-apocalyptic or dystopian futures since they are so bleak and often humorless. Not so Equations of Life. The protagonist chases and is chased around the secure (green zone?) of West London by Mad Max style gangs. But at the same time there are still corporations and privilege to contend with. Encounters on the way include Japanese Corporate Yakuza and combat trained nuns. Full marks to Simon Morden, who has written a slightly more light-hearted version of a post cyberpunk future. Some of the secondary characters are themselves attractive. Like Wong the cafe owner who camps up his oriental image. Or Chain, the seedy detective who makes seedy look smart. All in all a decent read.


Ack-Ack Macaque
Ack-Ack Macaque
by Gareth L Powell
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A nice read, 1 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I recall the original short story which shares the same name. It was one of those where the concept and character stays with the reader for a long time. I am pleased to see that although the original publisher Elastic Books is no longer, Gareth Powell has gone from strength to strength. He has taken the original story and expanded it to cover an alternate world where Akk Akk can be a real person as well as an online presence. The tale is not complex but still entertaining


Love [DVD]
Love [DVD]
Dvd ~ Gunner Wright
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: 7.74

7 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pretentious and boring, 22 Feb 2013
This review is from: Love [DVD] (DVD)
Love is not like 2001, nor is it like Moon. It is a long and pointless film about an astronaut who becomes marooned in space. He has over a hours worth of hallucinations and odd memories. Then it all gets explained in the last ten minutes. It really is a boring film. If you like watching a man in space tear pieces of paper and scribble then this is for you. Plot value = 0. Entertainment value = 0.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 13, 2013 4:17 PM GMT


Haiku
Haiku
by Andrew H. Vachss
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Quite a likeable tale once you get past some believability, 20 Feb 2013
This review is from: Haiku (Hardcover)
William McIlvaney portrayed a sympathetic view of down and outs in The Papers of Tony Veitch. It was believable because Veitch was a drunken nuisance, disliked by his family but could not help himself. In Haiku, Vachss has created a group of similar homeless in New York. They are presented with an opportunity one night when a woman is seen to dispose of a package in the river. They see the chance to find out who she is and blackmailing her to keep the information about the package quiet.

The believability gap is in the behaviour of the homeless characters. There is the absence of the psychiatric disorders that are common with long term homeless. The book contains little of the persistent drunkenness and alcohol dependency. They are much too cooperative and sociable with each other too. No fighting over a scrap or imagined insult.

But get past that and the tale is quite good. What do you do if you have no resources at all and want to make the simplest enquiries. How do you move three tons of paper and find a safe place to store it. In some respects this was like The Apprentice for down and outs. The characters are reasonably plausible if you ignore the absence of genuine tramp behaviour. They are mostly likeable and the reader can identify with them. The story moves at a rather sedate pace which reflects the fact that a group of homeless men cannot access the services the general populace takes for granted. The writing is easy to follow. The mens' families are seldom mentioned and they have only contact with each other.

The result is that the men are so marginalised by society that the people of New York can largely be ignored. This gives a better tale. All in all, not a bad book.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20