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Microsoft Student with Encarta Premium 2008 Win32 Mini Box DVD
Microsoft Student with Encarta Premium 2008 Win32 Mini Box DVD

1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Amazon.co.uk sells the US version of Encarta Student, not the UK one., 18 Jan. 2008
All the words are pronounced in American English, all the videos too... and so on. I already had the US version of Encarta Student since august 2007 (bought from Amazon.com), but I wanted to know the UK version. I had "only" to pay UKP 68.93 to get... the version I already had. Amazon UK does not want to know anything. They say I bought it from a "third seller", not from Amazon.co.uk. But my money was sent to Amazon UK. And I trusted in Amazon UK. No more.


Encyclopaedia Britannica 2006 Ultimate Reference Suite (PC/Mac DVD)
Encyclopaedia Britannica 2006 Ultimate Reference Suite (PC/Mac DVD)
Offered by Unique_Item_Bazaar
Price: £5.74

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars EB software does not work with Windows Vista, 3 Mar. 2007
EB own words: "Unfortunately, at this time the Britannica software is not compatible with Windows Vista. We are working on developing another version of the 2007 software that will work on Windows Vista and we are planning to release this version in the upcoming months. Please check back with us in another month or so and we should have some more information about the Vista-compatible software. But, it is entirely possible that we will not have Windows Vista compatible version of the 2007 product available and that we will wait until the development of the 2008 software." They do NOT offer a reasonable on-line subscription.


Encyclopaedia Britannica 2004 Ultimate Reference Suite DVD Edition and FREE Britannica Quizmaster
Encyclopaedia Britannica 2004 Ultimate Reference Suite DVD Edition and FREE Britannica Quizmaster

27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BRITANNICA (only USA edition) versus ENCARTA UK, 19 Jun. 2004
I have bought both Encarta and Britannica for years (EB in printed edition too: 32 volumes, 32.000 pages). This is my opinion in brief: Encarta UK is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (USA focused and sometimes outdated) makes interesting to buy both.
TEXT: Britannica is a superb encyclopedia of text (not in visual aid) since 1768 (you know: an article by Einstein and so on...). Since 1901 is published in USA (University of Chicago) and is VERY USA FOCUSED. Unlike Encarta, EB has not a UK edition. Contents in electronic version differs from printed encyclopedia (very large articles have been shortened). Britannica claims that it has more entries that Encarta, but this is a joke: articles like "Mexico" are only one (with a lot of subdivisions) in Encarta, while in Britannica subdivisions are unconnected, and you must "jump" from one subdivision to another, which is slow and very annoying, especially if you want to copy it in "WORD". Very often, the text is not updated. Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite has "3 encyclopedias in one: Elementary, Student and Adult".
On the other hand, Encarta's UK text (Premium Suite) is not bad at all. Most articles have the name of their contributors and their professions, works...: They are not "John Doe". You can find large fragments of literary works, literature guides, a lot of sidebars and thousands of quotations. "Encarta Africana" is included only in USA version. The Pop-Up (double clicking a word) Dictionary and Thesaurus has sound for correct pronunciation only in USA edition (by the way, it can read aloud, with a robotic and ugly voice, a whole article). The "Translation Dictionaries" to Spanish, French, German and Italian must be improved, because they are minimal. It gives you a lot of "Internet links", even if you are not connected. With Britannica you must be "on-line" and it searches in an EB Web page.
In theory you can update Britannica over the Internet free for a year quarterly (4 times), but this does not work. Encarta can be updated free EVERY MONTH (USA version every week) with new articles and additions or corrections to the old ones (until October 2004). With Encarta updating really works. Technologically is amazing to see the changes in old items.
ATLAS Britannica has not a real atlas; only a worlds map whose maximum detail are the States of USA. Statistics are very poor. Encarta's Atlas is like another encyclopedia, with a great detail (1 cm = 4 km all over the world) and 20 varieties of atlas presentations (statistical ones can be counted by dozens). If you look at a geographical article (city, river...) you can see in a corner where it is placed and, with only a click, open the Atlas. In articles of cities, if you are on-line, you can see in another corner the weather of this place in that moment.
MULTIMEDIA: They say that "serious" or "adult" readers do not care about "pictures"; that multimedia is only for kids. I do not agree, because I think that, sometimes, "A picture is worth a thousand words". Works of art, anatomy, historical maps, diagrams... Encarta devastates Britannica with a lot of photos, paintings, drawings, charts & tables, animations, interactivities, videos, music and sounds, pictures, 2-D and 3-D virtual tours, 360-degrees views, timeline, games... It is not only the quantity and quality. It is the easy access you have to all the multimedia, and that text and multimedia are fully integrated. Britannica is not really multimedia. It has photos and videos, but they make the program slow and sluggish. They should edit an alternative version with only text, as they did with the first edition in 1995. It performed fast and easy in old computers.
INTERFACE AND PERFORMANCE: This is the worst side of Britannica. With Encarta you only have to type a word or the beginning of a word to see all the articles and multimedia that contain it. If Encarta does not find anything, it gives you automatically alternative spellings. Even if you write the name of a small village lost in any country, you see it in the atlas. If you need to copy text or pictures, the integration with Microsoft WORD is perfect. The "Research Organizer" is very helpful too. Encarta's TEXT FONT is very clear (Britannica's...) and you can choose 3 sizes.
Navigating with Britannica is disappointing. I will only give you an example: if you do not know the exact and correct spelling of a name or word, it does not help you with similar spellings (unless you open a window and "battle" with it). As I said before, the program's performance speed is very slow and sluggish, and it must be dramatically improved. To go "back and forward" you do not find any icon and you need to open a "menu".... One "pro" for Britannica: they say it works with Macintosh.
INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS: Encarta has a lot in different languages. The four I utilize (United Kingdom, Spanish, French and Italian ones) are adaptations of USA version, which is inexorable talking about History, Geography, Literature and other topics. The MISERABLE thing is that articles that equally concern any human being (Health, Mathematics and the rest of Sciences) are a VERY RESUMED translation of USA edition that is, of course, the best of all. Why Microsoft follows such a policy?
I repeat my modest piece of advice: Encarta is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (sometimes outdated) make interesting to buy both.


Encarta Premium Suite 2004 DVD Edition
Encarta Premium Suite 2004 DVD Edition
Offered by Unique_Item_Bazaar
Price: £18.74

20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ENCARTA UK versus BRITANNICA (only USA edition), 19 Jun. 2004
I have bought both Encarta and Britannica for years (EB in printed edition too: 32 volumes, 32.000 pages). This is my opinion in brief: Encarta UK is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (USA focused and sometimes outdated) makes interesting to buy both.
TEXT: Britannica is a superb encyclopedia of text (not in visual aid) since 1768 (you know: an article by Einstein and so on...). Since 1901 is published in USA (University of Chicago) and is VERY USA FOCUSED. Unlike Encarta, EB has not a UK edition. Contents in electronic version differs from printed encyclopedia (very large articles have been shortened). Britannica claims that it has more entries that Encarta, but this is a joke: articles like "Mexico" are only one (with a lot of subdivisions) in Encarta, while in Britannica subdivisions are unconnected, and you must "jump" from one subdivision to another, which is slow and very annoying, especially if you want to copy it in "WORD". Very often, the text is not updated. Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite has "3 encyclopedias in one: Elementary, Student and Adult".
On the other hand, Encarta's UK text (Premium Suite) is not bad at all. Most articles have the name of their contributors and their professions, works...: They are not "John Doe". You can find large fragments of literary works, literature guides, a lot of sidebars and thousands of quotations. "Encarta Africana" is included only in USA version. The Pop-Up (double clicking a word) Dictionary and Thesaurus has sound for correct pronunciation only in USA edition (by the way, it can read aloud, with a robotic and ugly voice, a whole article). The "Translation Dictionaries" to Spanish, French, German and Italian must be improved, because they are minimal. It gives you a lot of "Internet links", even if you are not connected. With Britannica you must be "on-line" and it searches in an EB Web page.
In theory you can update Britannica over the Internet free for a year quarterly (4 times), but this does not work. Encarta can be updated free EVERY MONTH (USA version every week) with new articles and additions or corrections to the old ones (until October 2004). With Encarta updating really works. Technologically is amazing to see the changes in old items.
ATLAS Britannica has not a real atlas; only a worlds map whose maximum detail are the States of USA. Statistics are very poor. Encarta's Atlas is like another encyclopedia, with a great detail (1 cm = 4 km all over the world) and 20 varieties of atlas presentations (statistical ones can be counted by dozens). If you look at a geographical article (city, river...) you can see in a corner where it is placed and, with only a click, open the Atlas. In articles of cities, if you are on-line, you can see in another corner the weather of this place in that moment.
MULTIMEDIA: They say that "serious" or "adult" readers do not care about "pictures"; that multimedia is only for kids. I do not agree, because I think that, sometimes, "A picture is worth a thousand words". Works of art, anatomy, historical maps, diagrams... Encarta devastates Britannica with a lot of photos, paintings, drawings, charts & tables, animations, interactivities, videos, music and sounds, pictures, 2-D and 3-D virtual tours, 360-degrees views, timeline, games... It is not only the quantity and quality. It is the easy access you have to all the multimedia, and that text and multimedia are fully integrated. Britannica is not really multimedia. It has photos and videos, but they make the program slow and sluggish. They should edit an alternative version with only text, as they did with the first edition in 1995. It performed fast and easy in old computers.
INTERFACE AND PERFORMANCE: This is the worst side of Britannica. With Encarta you only have to type a word or the beginning of a word to see all the articles and multimedia that contain it. If Encarta does not find anything, it gives you automatically alternative spellings. Even if you write the name of a small village lost in any country, you see it in the atlas. If you need to copy text or pictures, the integration with Microsoft WORD is perfect. The "Research Organizer" is very helpful too. Encarta's TEXT FONT is very clear (Britannica's...) and you can choose 3 sizes.
Navigating with Britannica is disappointing. I will only give you an example: if you do not know the exact and correct spelling of a name or word, it does not help you with similar spellings (unless you open a window and "battle" with it). As I said before, the program's performance speed is very slow and sluggish, and it must be dramatically improved. To go "back and forward" you do not find any icon and you need to open a "menu".... One "pro" for Britannica: they say it works with Macintosh.
INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS: Encarta has a lot in different languages. The four I utilize (United Kingdom, Spanish, French and Italian ones) are adaptations of USA version, which is inexorable talking about History, Geography, Literature and other topics. The MISERABLE thing is that articles that equally concern any human being (Health, Mathematics and the rest of Sciences) are a VERY RESUMED translation of USA edition that is, of course, the best of all. Why Microsoft follows such a policy?
I repeat my modest piece of advice: Encarta is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (sometimes outdated) make interesting to buy both.


Longman Dictionary of English Language and Culture
Longman Dictionary of English Language and Culture
by Martin Aitchison
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very useful English-English dictionary and encyclopedia, 18 Jun. 2004
In 1568 thin pages, it combines a full coverage of American and British English with the cultural information you need to understand references to people, places, and events in newspapers, in literature, on TV and in films, as well as in general conversations.
Very good for teachers, students (better in Upper Intermediate or Advanced levels) and cultured people in general.


Britannica Concise Encyclopedia (Encylopaedia)
Britannica Concise Encyclopedia (Encylopaedia)
by Dale H. Hoiberg
Edition: Hardcover

36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Britannica Concise versus Columbia Encyclopedia, 12 Jun. 2004
I think both books are outstanding, and more complementary than rivals. In fact, I use both. Nevertheless, there are some differences (but both are made in USA, and very USA focused).
Columbia's big dimensions and weight (8.9 pounds/4 kg) make almost necessary to read it on a desk. Britannica Concise (BCE) is 6.7 pounds/3 kg and smaller.
Both utilize an extremely small font size. Columbia contains 6.5 million words. BCE "only" 2.6.
Britannica C has over 2000 photographs, maps, tables, drawings, color illustrations; nations flags ... In Columbia, illustrations are sparse, limited to about 500 black-and-white line drawings.
Columbia's 6th edition stopped in 1999. BCE is of April 2003 and is edited every year in spring, but I don't know if they are going to update it or not.
Britannica Concise has articles like Super Bowl, Viagra, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Big Stick Policy, Mother's Day and Father's Day ... that don't exist in Columbia.
Quantity does not always mean Quality. B Concise seems to be more shrewd, witty and, by the way, less subjective.
As I said before, both books are outstanding and complementary.


Encyclopaedia Britannica 2004 Ultimate Reference Suite
Encyclopaedia Britannica 2004 Ultimate Reference Suite

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BRITANNICA (only USA edition) versus ENCARTA UK, 7 Jun. 2004
I have bought both Encarta and Britannica for years (EB in printed edition too: 32 volumes, 32.000 pages). This is my opinion in brief: Encarta UK is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (USA focused and sometimes outdated) makes interesting to buy both.
TEXT: Britannica is a superb encyclopedia of text (not in visual aid) since 1768 (you know: an article by Einstein and so on...). Since 1901 is published in USA (University of Chicago) and is VERY USA FOCUSED. Unlike Encarta, EB has not a UK edition. Contents in electronic version differs from printed encyclopedia (very large articles have been shortened). Britannica claims that it has more entries that Encarta, but this is a joke: articles like "Mexico" are only one (with a lot of subdivisions) in Encarta, while in Britannica subdivisions are unconnected, and you must "jump" from one subdivision to another, which is slow and very annoying, especially if you want to copy it in "WORD". Very often, the text is not updated. Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite has "3 encyclopedias in one: Elementary, Student and Adult".
On the other hand, Encarta's UK text (Premium Suite) is not bad at all. Most articles have the name of their contributors and their professions, works...: They are not "John Doe". You can find large fragments of literary works, literature guides, a lot of sidebars and thousands of quotations. "Encarta Africana" is included only in USA version. The Pop-Up (double clicking a word) Dictionary and Thesaurus has sound for correct pronunciation only in USA edition (by the way, it can read aloud, with a robotic and ugly voice, a whole article). The "Translation Dictionaries" to Spanish, French, German and Italian must be improved, because they are minimal. It gives you a lot of "Internet links", even if you are not connected. With Britannica you must be "on-line" and it searches in an EB Web page.
In theory you can update Britannica over the Internet free for a year quarterly (4 times), but this does not work. Encarta can be updated free EVERY MONTH (USA version every week) with new articles and additions or corrections to the old ones (until October 2004). With Encarta updating really works. Technologically is amazing to see the changes in old items.
ATLAS Britannica has not a real atlas; only a worlds map whose maximum detail are the States of USA. Statistics are very poor. Encarta's Atlas is like another encyclopedia, with a great detail (1 cm = 4 km all over the world) and 20 varieties of atlas presentations (statistical ones can be counted by dozens). If you look at a geographical article (city, river...) you can see in a corner where it is placed and, with only a click, open the Atlas. In articles of cities, if you are on-line, you can see in another corner the weather of this place in that moment.
MULTIMEDIA: They say that "serious" or "adult" readers do not care about "pictures"; that multimedia is only for kids. I do not agree, because I think that, sometimes, "A picture is worth a thousand words". Works of art, anatomy, historical maps, diagrams... Encarta devastates Britannica with a lot of photos, paintings, drawings, charts & tables, animations, interactivities, videos, music and sounds, pictures, 2-D and 3-D virtual tours, 360-degrees views, timeline, games... It is not only the quantity and quality. It is the easy access you have to all the multimedia, and that text and multimedia are fully integrated. Britannica is not really multimedia. It has photos and videos, but they make the program slow and sluggish. They should edit an alternative version with only text, as they did with the first edition in 1995. It performed fast and easy in old computers.
INTERFACE AND PERFORMANCE: This is the worst side of Britannica. With Encarta you only have to type a word or the beginning of a word to see all the articles and multimedia that contain it. If Encarta does not find anything, it gives you automatically alternative spellings. Even if you write the name of a small village lost in any country, you see it in the atlas. If you need to copy text or pictures, the integration with Microsoft WORD is perfect. The "Research Organizer" is very helpful too. Encarta's TEXT FONT is very clear (Britannica's...) and you can choose 3 sizes.
Navigating with Britannica is disappointing. I will only give you an example: if you do not know the exact and correct spelling of a name or word, it does not help you with similar spellings (unless you open a window and "battle" with it). As I said before, the program's performance speed is very slow and sluggish, and it must be dramatically improved. To go "back and forward" you do not find any icon and you need to open a "menu".... One "pro" for Britannica: they say it works with Macintosh.
INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS: Encarta has a lot in different languages. The four I utilize (United Kingdom, Spanish, French and Italian ones) are adaptations of USA version, which is inexorable talking about History, Geography, Literature and other topics. The MISERABLE thing is that articles that equally concern any human being (Health, Mathematics and the rest of Sciences) are a VERY RESUMED translation of USA edition that is, of course, the best of all. Why Microsoft follows such a policy?
I repeat my modest piece of advice: Encarta UK is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (USA focused and sometimes outdated) make interesting to buy both.


Encarta Premium Suite 2004 CD Edition
Encarta Premium Suite 2004 CD Edition

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ENCARTA UK versus BRITANNICA (only USA edition), 7 Jun. 2004
I have bought both Encarta and Britannica for years (EB in printed edition too: 32 volumes, 32.000 pages). This is my opinion in brief: Encarta UK is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (USA focused and sometimes outdated) makes interesting to buy both.
TEXT: Britannica is a superb encyclopedia of text (not in visual aid) since 1768 (you know: an article by Einstein and so on...). Since 1901 is published in USA (University of Chicago) and is VERY USA FOCUSED. Unlike Encarta, EB has not a UK edition. Contents in electronic version differs from printed encyclopedia (very large articles have been shortened). Britannica claims that it has more entries that Encarta, but this is a joke: articles like "Mexico" are only one (with a lot of subdivisions) in Encarta, while in Britannica subdivisions are unconnected, and you must "jump" from one subdivision to another, which is slow and very annoying, especially if you want to copy it in "WORD". Very often, the text is not updated. Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite has "3 encyclopedias in one: Elementary, Student and Adult".
On the other hand, Encarta's UK text (Premium Suite) is not bad at all. Most articles have the name of their contributors and their professions, works...: They are not "John Doe". You can find large fragments of literary works, literature guides, a lot of sidebars and thousands of quotations. "Encarta Africana" is included only in USA version. The Pop-Up (double clicking a word) Dictionary and Thesaurus has sound for correct pronunciation only in USA edition (by the way, it can read aloud, with a robotic and ugly voice, a whole article). The "Translation Dictionaries" to Spanish, French, German and Italian must be improved, because they are minimal. It gives you a lot of "Internet links", even if you are not connected. With Britannica you must be "on-line" and it searches in an EB Web page.
In theory you can update Britannica over the Internet free for a year quarterly (4 times), but this does not work. Encarta can be updated free EVERY MONTH (USA version every week) with new articles and additions or corrections to the old ones (until October 2004). With Encarta updating really works. Technologically is amazing to see the changes in old items.
ATLAS Britannica has not a real atlas; only a worlds map whose maximum detail are the States of USA. Statistics are very poor. Encarta's Atlas is like another encyclopedia, with a great detail (1 cm = 4 km all over the world) and 20 varieties of atlas presentations (statistical ones can be counted by dozens). If you look at a geographical article (city, river...) you can see in a corner where it is placed and, with only a click, open the Atlas. In articles of cities, if you are on-line, you can see in another corner the weather of this place in that moment.
MULTIMEDIA: They say that "serious" or "adult" readers do not care about "pictures"; that multimedia is only for kids. I do not agree, because I think that, sometimes, "A picture is worth a thousand words". Works of art, anatomy, historical maps, diagrams... Encarta devastates Britannica with a lot of photos, paintings, drawings, charts & tables, animations, interactivities, videos, music and sounds, pictures, 2-D and 3-D virtual tours, 360-degrees views, timeline, games... It is not only the quantity and quality. It is the easy access you have to all the multimedia, and that text and multimedia are fully integrated. Britannica is not really multimedia. It has photos and videos, but they make the program slow and sluggish. They should edit an alternative version with only text, as they did with the first edition in 1995. It performed fast and easy in old computers.
INTERFACE AND PERFORMANCE: This is the worst side of Britannica. With Encarta you only have to type a word or the beginning of a word to see all the articles and multimedia that contain it. If Encarta does not find anything, it gives you automatically alternative spellings. Even if you write the name of a small village lost in any country, you see it in the atlas. If you need to copy text or pictures, the integration with Microsoft WORD is perfect. The "Research Organizer" is very helpful too. Encarta's TEXT FONT is very clear (Britannica's...) and you can choose 3 sizes.
Navigating with Britannica is disappointing. I will only give you an example: if you do not know the exact and correct spelling of a name or word, it does not help you with similar spellings (unless you open a window and "battle" with it). As I said before, the program's performance speed is very slow and sluggish, and it must be dramatically improved. To go "back and forward" you do not find any icon and you need to open a "menu".... One "pro" for Britannica: they say it works with Macintosh.
INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS: Encarta has a lot in different languages. The four I utilize (United Kingdom, Spanish, French and Italian ones) are adaptations of USA version, which is inexorable talking about History, Geography, Literature and other topics. The MISERABLE thing is that articles that equally concern any human being (Health, Mathematics and the rest of Sciences) are a VERY RESUMED translation of USA edition that is, of course, the best of all. Why Microsoft follows such a policy?
I repeat my modest piece of advice: Encarta is excellent in all aspects, but Britannica's authoritative text (sometimes outdated) make interesting to buy both.


Britannica Concise Encyclopedia
Britannica Concise Encyclopedia
by Encyclopaedia Britannica
Edition: Textbook Binding

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Britannica Concise versus Columbia Encyclopedia, 2 Jun. 2004
I think both books are outstanding, and more complementary than rivals. In fact, I use both. Nevertheless, there are some differences (but both are made in USA, and very USA focused).
Columbia’s big dimensions and weight (8.9 pounds/4 kg) make almost necessary to read it on a desk. Britannica Concise (BCE) is 6.7 pounds/3 kg and smaller.
Both utilize an extremely small font size. Columbia contains 6.5 million words. BCE “only” 2.6.
Britannica C has over 2000 photographs, maps, tables, drawings, color illustrations; nations flags ... In Columbia, illustrations are sparse, limited to about 500 black-and-white line drawings.
Columbia’s 6th edition stopped in 1999. BCE is of April 2003 and is edited every year in spring, but I don’t know if they are going to update it or not.
Britannica Concise has articles like Super Bowl, Viagra, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Big Stick Policy, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day ... that don’t exist in Columbia.
Quantity does not always mean Quality. B Concise seems to be more shrewd, witty and, by the way, less subjective.
As I said before, both books are outstanding and complementary.


The Columbia Encyclopedia
The Columbia Encyclopedia
by Houghton
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Columbia versus Britannica Concise, 2 Jun. 2004
I think both books are outstanding, and more complementary than rivals. In fact, I use both. Nevertheless, there are some differences (but both are made in USA, and very USA focused).
Columbia’s big dimensions and weight (8.9 pounds/4 kg) make almost necessary to read it on a desk. Britannica Concise (BCE) is 6.7 pounds/3 kg and smaller.
Both utilize an extremely small font size. Columbia contains 6.5 million words. BCE “only” 2.6.
Britannica C has over 2000 photographs, maps, tables, drawings, color illustrations; nations flags ... In Columbia, illustrations are sparse, limited to about 500 black-and-white line drawings.
Columbia’s 6th edition stopped in 1999. BCE is of April 2003 and is edited every year in spring, but I don’t know if they are going to update it or not.
Britannica Concise has articles like Super Bowl, Viagra, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Big Stick Policy, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day ... that don’t exist in Columbia.
Quantity does not always mean Quality. B Concise seems to be more shrewd, witty and, by the way, less subjective.
As I said before, both books are outstanding and complementary.


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