Profile for Mr. Graham C. Bird > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Mr. Graham C. Bird
Top Reviewer Ranking: 607,898
Helpful Votes: 9

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Mr. Graham C. Bird (Royaume Uni)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Leven & East of Fife Railway (Oakwood Library of Railway History)
The Leven & East of Fife Railway (Oakwood Library of Railway History)
by A. Simpson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.95

4.0 out of 5 stars The Leven & East of Fife Railway, 25 Jan 2014
The book tells the story of a minor Scottish line in the Kingdom of Fife. Like many others, it started independently and was later taken over by a main line company (in this case the North British Railway). It led a quiet existence until it closed to passengers in the 1960s and freight somewhat later. However the original company sacked its first Engineer, Thomas Bouch, for incompetence. So it's of interest that his later career ended spectacularly with the notorious collapse of the Tay Bridge in 1879.

The history of the line (and its motive power) is related in full from opening to closure, and also considers its economic and social background. It is well illustrated and there is a good index. The book is the final part of a trilogy by the same authors.


Mapping Britain's Lost Branch Lines: A nostalgic look at Britain's branch lines in old maps and photographs
Mapping Britain's Lost Branch Lines: A nostalgic look at Britain's branch lines in old maps and photographs
by Paul Atterbury
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.99

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mapping Britain's Lost Branch Lines, 24 Jan 2014
This book is well presented, has a fascinating collection of pictures, 25 handy maps, and some interesting (if sometimes brief) notes on 260 or so 'lost' British branch lines. It's fine either for browsing or for 'on the ground' exploration. So far so good. But what's not to like? Well, a number of the supposedly 'lost' lines are still very much with us, and are even electrified - eg the Seaford branch and Watford-St Albans. Why devote space to these when other, genuinely 'lost', lines such as the Ventnor West branch or the Lynton & Barnstaple could have been covered instead? Also, the author's somewhat artificial exclusion of routes connecting two junctions rules out a vast number of lines - Chichester-Midhurst or the Bure Valley line, for example - which share all the characteristics of branch lines. We need another volume to deal with these! Finally, some of the maps are slightly misleading - it looks like the Clevedon branch, for example, joined up with the Weston, Clevedon & Portishead. But it didn't! So, a very good product but, for me, it doesn't quite get top marks.


Page: 1