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Anatomy Of A Murder
Anatomy Of A Murder
Dvd
Offered by Lovefilm UK Limited
Price: 0.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Must see, 24 April 2014
This review is from: Anatomy Of A Murder (DVD)
Wonderful suspense sustained till the end; beautifully acted. Entertaining and witty, can be watched with the whole family. Thoroughly recommended.


Men's fully adjustable Clip on Braces/Suspenders - Black
Men's fully adjustable Clip on Braces/Suspenders - Black
Offered by Sassy You
Price: 10.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good metal clips, 31 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
These braces have very good metal clips, and they do not seem to bite into the cotton trousers. The straps are okay for casual use.


Mens braces wide adjustable and elastic suspenders Y shape with a very strong clips - Heavy duty (Dark Blue)
Mens braces wide adjustable and elastic suspenders Y shape with a very strong clips - Heavy duty (Dark Blue)

4.0 out of 5 stars very strong, excellent for workwear or thick cotton trousers., 23 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The chrome plated metal clips are very strong, and there is little chance of the clips coming undone. But the vice like teeth also bite into the material, so may tear fine material, eg wool or linen. Excellent for workwear, and may be okay on thick cotton trousers. For my woollen trousers I have had to buy other braces.

The straps are also fairly wide at 39 mm, too wide for office trousers or dinner suits.


Namiki The Falcon Flexible Nib Fountain Pen, Black Resin Barrel, Soft Medium Nib, (60252)
Namiki The Falcon Flexible Nib Fountain Pen, Black Resin Barrel, Soft Medium Nib, (60252)
Offered by Creston
Price: 120.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good pen with a Fine nib; does Not have a "flexible" nib!, 18 Sep 2013
Namiki Falcon, Soft Fine: (rated as a pen with a Fine nib, not as a pen with "flexible" nib)

I am a regular fountain pen (and an occasional dip pen) user since school days, and I have a variety of pens including some high quality pens. Most of the time I write in an ordinary style, but I can write in a calligraphy style using an italic or an oblique nib.

I bought this beautiful looking pen with a view to having my first "flexible nib" fountain pen, for daily use (dip pens are fantastic but you can't carry them around). I wanted a modern pen as opposed to an antique/used pen, and I chose a Soft Fine nib.

The Soft Fine nib is slightly finer than the usual fine nibs we get in the UK. The pen has a wonderful ink flow. The nib gives a little, but is NOT a "flexible nib". Posting the cap on the body makes the writing lighter and better. The line width variability, a key feature of "flexible nibs" is imperceptible. (The writing is nothing like the sample writing shown on the website. In fact I felt misled, but I won't return the pen.) It writes like a pen with a rather nice fine nib; but the scratchiness is distinctly audible, although reduced after writing some 200 pages of A5, so far. Recently I had to complete a lot of forms and the fine nib was excellent for the purpose. Also the SF nib deposits less ink on paper compared to say a M or OBB. With so many notebooks sold with somewhat thin paper, it is an advantage that this nib does not soak through, and one can write on the reverse side of the paper.

The refillable ink converter has an infuriatingly tiny capacity. A great disappointment for a pen that carries the late Prof Namiki's (founder) name - Pilot should rethink. Cartridges have their advantage, but with such a wonderful range of inks now available today, users want refillable pens. (Since bottled ink is far from cheap, I don't see manufacturers or retailers making less money selling bottled ink as opposed to ink cartridges. So why not provide decent size converters?)

It is a good pen with a Fine (not flexible) nib. Without a good size converter it is not practical/dependable enough for daily use. Over priced (It should be sold at $99 equiv in the UK, not 150). Mont blanc or Pelikan are far better pens.

I purchased the pen from Amazon US, as UK was far too expensive (even after taking duty and express air freight into consideration), and the product was delivered by 9 am on the 3rd day of ordering - amazing! Also in the US they offer a much wider range of ink cartridges for this pen. Why is it that UK customers are so often neglected or ripped off?


The Philosophical Traditions of India (Routledge Library Editions: Buddhism)
The Philosophical Traditions of India (Routledge Library Editions: Buddhism)
by P T Raju
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 94.55

5.0 out of 5 stars one of the best intro to Indian philosophy, 7 May 2012
This is an excellent book. I have read at least thirty books (incl. multi-volume ones) on Indian philosophy (and over 300 books on Hinduism), by Western and Indian authors, published in the last 130 years or so, and I find this to be one of the best 'introductions'. It is succinct and balanced, and written in Western English for students in the West. (That it avoids some Western authors' misunderstandings of Hinduism, or pro-Buddhist leanings, or anti-Brahmanical prejudices, or simply Western/Christian feelings of superiority, is a welcome bonus.) Eminently suitable for Western readers and for children of Indians raised in the West.

(I would also recommend Prof Lipner's "Hindus" - the first edition is just as good as the second)as a general introduction.)

I do not see this book advertised much in the UK/US. I bought my copy, by chance, from Motilal Banarsidass, while on tour in India. I very much hope the publishers take a fresh look at making this book widely available in India and the West. (PS: I am not connected with either authors mentioned here.)


Patanjali's Yoga Sutra (Penguin Classics)
Patanjali's Yoga Sutra (Penguin Classics)
by Patanjali
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars definitely worth a read, 6 May 2012
This is a very good book on Yoga Sutra; also a good self-help book to manage modern-day stress; definitely worth a read.

Yoga is about mental discipline, mastering one's mind to live a more fulfilled /less stressful life in this world, as we find it. Any reader, irrespective of his faith, should benefit from this book, whether s/he believes in the Hindu idea of karma or not, and whether s/he tries to (or even ultimately manages to) attain kaivalya (isolation/liberation) or not.

In some quarters yoga has got itself a bad name (due for example to excessive emphasis on certain types of physical exercise, abuse of 'tricks' of yoga, or misuse of herbs/drugs to enhance physical powers) and as a result many people avoid finding out about yoga, thinking it is not for them. I too was such a cynic but after reading this book I feel Patanjali's ideas are of much wider application and perhaps even of universal benefit.

The book is written in modern, Western English and alludes to Western philosophical concepts where relevant. Readers in the West, and children of Indian origin raised in the West, should find it easy to read.

The author rightly puts ethics/dharma in the centre of Hindu philosophical thought, which is overdue in Indological writings, and deserves praise.

Read the book as a self-improvement book if nothing else, in the quiet of your home, and check out whether you agree with Patanjali who lived circa 2-3c A.D.!

Some thoughts for the 2nd edn:

(1) Should the Intro also have a short summary of the text, which a reader could use as a helpful guide? [Particularly so, as some of the sutra-s repeat or elaborate an earlier idea, a few sutra-s appear to be in the wrong sequence, and the commentary (mostly helpful, occasionally over-elaborate) make the text - excluding the Intro - quite long at nearly 240 pages.]

(2) Expand the Glossary to incorporate all specialist words relating to Yoga Sutra?


Rama the Steadfast: An Early Form of the Ramayana (Penguin Classics)
Rama the Steadfast: An Early Form of the Ramayana (Penguin Classics)
by M Valmiki
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy this book!, 16 Oct 2010
The Ramayana is the great Hindu epic poem (kavya) by Valmiki, written about 500-300 BCE. But the story probably existed for centuries before it was composed by Valmiki, and enhanced by others subsequently. The Ramayana is older than the Mahabharata (which is considered the epic history - itihasa), and the two books are well known to most Hindus, at least in part. These books describe Hindu values and ethics (dharma) and I recommend all Hindus to read them and introduce them to their children.

"Rama the Steadfast" (2006) by the great Sanskritist, Prof Brockington (and his wife), is a scholarly translation. Both authors are authorities on Hindu epics and I would recommend this book for general readers and specialist scholars alike. Being a translation of the critical edition, it leaves out Books 1 and 7. [I wish these had been included as Appendices, because the whole story is over 2000 years old, and most Hindus are sceptical about Western ideas of "ur" (the original) version.]

I hope Penguin see fit to offer a competitively priced hardback version of this book soon, as they have already done for some of their other books. The Ramayana is a "holy book" and will be read and re-read, and this book is a true classic!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 22, 2011 11:11 AM BST


The Ramayana (Penguin Hardback Classics)
The Ramayana (Penguin Hardback Classics)
by M Valmiki
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 9.09

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Does this book kill the beauty of the Ramayana kavya?, 15 Oct 2010
The Ramayana is the great Hindu epic poem (kavya) by Valmiki c 5-3c BC. But the story probably existed for centuries before it was composed by Valmiki, and enhanced by others subsequently. The Ramayana is older than the Mahabharata (which is considered the Hindu epic history - itihasa). These two books are well known to most Hindus, at least in part. These two books, considered holy, describe Hindu values and ethics (dharma) and I recommend all Hindus to read them and introduce them to their children.

Prof Sattar has taken great trouble to abridge and re-tell the story in an easy, flowing and simple language such that even a child can read and understand it without assistance. She has incorporated the first (Childhood) and the seventh (Epilogue) Books, considered by many as later additions, to provide the traditional "full story". However, the English although modern is not how it is spoken in the West, and children particularly in the West may find the expressions jarring. (By using modern English, the quaintness of old Sanskrit expressions is also lost.) The narrative style is very flat - almost devoid of any excitement, passion or human emotions. (You only have to see plays and films on the Ramayana or hear a Sanskrit [or other Indian language] recital to appreciate what a loss that is!) The story has been retold in such a (boring) way that even a committed Hindu adult will have difficulty maintaining interest, let alone a young reader. Had she written in an "unputdownable" style, given her easy story telling abilities, the book might have been a real hit, as a story book.

This book is not a scholarly "true to Sanskrit" translation, as acknowledged by the author. Nor does it bring out Hindu values or highlight their culture.

Alas, in my view, this book is a missed opportunity. Penguin, the publishers, are absolutely right that the Ramayana is a Classic, but this abridged re-telling of the story is anything but a "Classic".

Fortunately, Penguin have an alternative translation of the Ramayana, which deserves to become a "classic".

"Rama the Steadfast" (2006) by the great Sanskritist, Prof Brockington (and his wife) is a true scholarly translation. Prof Brockington is an authority on Hindu epics and I would recommend this book for general readers and specialist scholars alike. (Being a translation of the critical edition, it leaves out Books 1 and 7. I wish these had been included as Appendices, because the whole story is over 2000 years old, and most Hindus are sceptical about Western ideas of "ur" [the original] version.) It is not a children's book but the language is by no means difficult, and most parents would want their 11-14 year olds to possess this much vocabulary. It is priced about the same, but sadly is in paperback only. (I hope Penguin see fit to produce a competitively priced hardback version soon.) This is the book that I re-read with pleasure and it is the one that I will buy again (to present to someone). [PS: I am not a student of Prof Brockington, nor have I met him.]

**C R Rajagopalachari's book (1957) remains an excellent book for both children and adults. It is an abridged re-telling of the story, but it reflects the Hindu spirit. I bought my copy in 1962 for Rs 2.00 from AH Wheeler & Co, the company with their iconic bookstores on Railway Platforms throughout India. (** a Sanskritist with excellent fluency in English, author of many books, an ardent Indian freedom fighter, a close associate of Mahatma Gandhi, the first Indian Governor-General of India, Chief Minister of Madras, etc)

And we are all waiting for Prof Goldman's 7 vol translation (the definitive translation?) to be completed soon.

On Binding:

It was a very nice touch to have this book bound - because it will be considered a "holy" book by many Hindus and they will read it again and again. The Publishers must be congratulated for offering a Hardback at such a reasonable price!


The Upanishads (Classics)
The Upanishads (Classics)
by Juan Mascaro
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy this book!, 21 Sep 2010
It covers most of the important topics despite its compact size. It is the best translation I have come across. It does not have others' commentaries, but the author's Introduction is brilliant.

A must read for all Hindus.


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