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crewcutandnewt "crewcutandnewt" (Bucks, UK)

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The Hobbit: The Battle of The Five Armies
The Hobbit: The Battle of The Five Armies
Dvd

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but a bit meandering..., 18 May 2015
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Good film, but I rather feel it was a bit strung out. Great battle scenes and graphics (if that is the right word) but found it short on plot and characterisation. Lord of the Rings justified three part treatment but Hobbit which is a short book IMHO doesn't, still some great bits and worth watching (couldn't miss it as we had seen the others which, I guess, is what they bank on).


No Title Available

2.0 out of 5 stars Don't bounce, 13 Jun. 2014
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Really cheap, so feel I shouldn't be too harsh. But these balls do not bounce, even on concrete when you throw them really hard. Good value for the dog or to kick around, but forget it if you want to play tennis with them.


Duck's Day Out
Duck's Day Out
by Jez Alborough
Edition: Paperback

1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 13 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Duck's Day Out (Paperback)
Disappointing given what I paid for this (just noticed it was a Bookstart book, so no criticism of it as a giveaway etc) but it is very short and much smaller than the other Duck books, so have to agree with the other negative views on this site...pity this wasn't made clear in the description. If it had been, I wouldn't have bought it!


A Modern Military Mother
A Modern Military Mother
by Clare Macnaughton
Edition: Paperback

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heartfelt and funny, 10 April 2013
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If you're looking for a down-to-earth slice of life with a lot of humour thrown in for good measure, then look no further.

The book is based on A Modern Military Mother's blog of the same name. MacNaugthen's style is crisp and direct, as she describes the stresses of military life, not just through the impact it has on her husband, Hagar, but on the whole family.” Military life doesn’t allow you to have a stable relationship,” she writes early on. Later, she describes herself as “married, single celibate.” It's an interesting and intimate journal style account of life married to the military.

Right now, military wives are in vogue. But MacNaugten doesn't quite fit with the choir singing, garden partying, stereotype. Certainlly, she describes well a life of partings and reunions, which (apart from the omnipresent threat of loss) makes routine virtually impossible. For example, MacNaughten is poignant when she describes Hagar slipping out in the early hours of the morning on his way to ops, trying not to wake her. But, for me, at least, it's her humour that really makes this book work.

MacNaughten deals with the big stuff (like another review says, rightly, that her writing is heartfelt). And she charts the day-to-day challenges of being married to the military well, for example, she describes the difficulties of finding the right school for her children, the disrupted leave caused by the Icelandic ash cloud.

However, she excels at exploding the traditional expectations of appropriate behaviour for a military wife. For example, her description of the mince-pie bake-off (“not some tongue-in-cheek mince pie gag but a very serious competition”) made me laugh outloud. Perhaps it should come with a health warning; shoots from the hip and may contain strong language. But it is in context.

Like another reviewer, I devoured it in a single sitting or, in my case, curled up in bed. It's a feel-good read without being sickly sweet. My only criticism, it's a tad on the short side, at 98 pages. Yet somehow the shorter pithier style seems to fit well with the Kindle. And, it left me wanting more, which is always a good sign (particularly given the number of books I never finish!).


Dealing with Clients' Emotional Problems in Life Coaching: A Rational-Emotive and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (RECBT) Approach
Dealing with Clients' Emotional Problems in Life Coaching: A Rational-Emotive and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (RECBT) Approach
by Windy Dryden
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful but a bit heavy going, 2 Jun. 2011
I bought this as a life coach looking for some pointers on how (and whether) to work with clients who are emotionally "stuck."

Dryden writes well and the book is heavily evidenced based with a firm underlying theoretical basis and definite program for working with clients who are presenting with an emotional disturbance that prevents them from achieving their life coaching goals.

I'd say it is a great book for someone who is able to work as a counsellor (adopting CBT) and as a life coach. But it's not the sort of book that you can dip into easily - I'm guessing it's not designed to be. You'd need some familiarity with CBT beforehand.

For me (writing an essay on counselling and life coaching) it addressed issues about the relationship between these two disciplines that aren't often voiced. However, I would say it's not a book for novices or coaches who do not have a solid grounding in psychology/counselling in addition to their coaching qualification.


The Tribes of the Person-centred Nation: A Guide to the Schools of Therapy Associated with the Person-centred Approach
The Tribes of the Person-centred Nation: A Guide to the Schools of Therapy Associated with the Person-centred Approach
by Pete Sanders
Edition: Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars easy to read, informative, 2 Jun. 2011
I bought this primarily to help with an essay I had to write on PCC and to get an overview for the more recent developments stemming from Rogerian counselling.

It's clear, well written and nicely broken down into chapters. It was a pleasure to read (unlike many textbooks). The references are good and there are lots of useful pointers for further reading.

I wasn't disappointed. It contains an excellent overview of the development of person centred counselling. For me, however, the biggest plus was that it put this in context. As a student, I had heard a lot about Rogers. This book, however, allowed me to get an overview on how the person centred approach has developed since and some of the controversies within the approach (and which beg the question what is PCC?)

In particular, I found the final chapter on Integrative approaches useful and thought-provoking. I'm a first year student and (rather naively) I'd never seriously questioned how someone can practice a person-centred approach and also work psycho-dynamically. This book took me beyond a superficial disdain for a "pick and mix" approach to therapy, and made me think about how the underlying theoretical framework should determine not only practice, but how we are.


ProBlogger: Secrets for Blogging Your Way to a Six-Figure Income
ProBlogger: Secrets for Blogging Your Way to a Six-Figure Income
by Darren Rowse
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.99

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction, 31 May 2011
I bought this book after reading the other reviews - and was mindful that I am a relative novice (so the comments that it is not the best choice for more experienced bloggers or techies may hold good).

I found it well written and with lots of practical examples and useful links. I don't know if the authors' claims to make a six figure income are exaggerated, but they do put this very much in perspective...making it clear that it is not a get-rich-quick scheme...so I felt their own experiences to be genuinely relaid.

As someone who is simply interested in getting a handle on how a site can be monetarised, I found this a really helpful introduction that cut through all the tons of conflicting information I had been grappling with.

It was easy to read (digested in a couple of days) and within a matter of days I was able to put together a self-hosted blog and add adsense to it...so I'd say it was definitely what I needed to make me that one step further, but it would also be useful to absolute beginners.


The No. 1 Car Spotter (Walker Racing Reads)
The No. 1 Car Spotter (Walker Racing Reads)
by Atinuke
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A refreshing read - and a bit different, 31 May 2011
I bought this to read to my son (because he is really into cars and because the cover attracted me). The language though is clear and engaging - it's a good book for confident readers to tackle themselves.

It's not too long, not too short, 110 pages of generously spaced text and copiously illustrated with quirky black and white line drawings.

The story is about a boy in an African village, but there's lots here that children anywhere can relate to (the book is proof that somethings - like having to do tasks we don't always like - are universal). It has the ring of authenticity, explores what it means to be poor in a rich man's world, but without being sentimentally cloying.

Although it's about children in an undeveloped village, their dilemmas and activities are universal. The final chapter, in particular, really makes you think.

I would definitely recommend it as a good book for boys, or girls, or their parents (particularly if you are looking for something a bit more unusual than the usual run-of-the-mill animal/adventure/sporting stories). It's a good story and an imaginative way into exploring other worlds.


Between the Assassinations
Between the Assassinations
by Aravind Adiga
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written, but not White Tiger, 4 May 2010
Like a couple of the other reviews, I was disappointed that this wasn't as satirical or (in my view) as compelling as White Tiger (which I raved over). It is a collection of interconnecting short stories or vignettes, all beautifully written and all very evocative, but I did not feel anything was moving the narrative forward. Perhaps I am being unfair, but I felt that there either should have been more interconnectness or plot to given any sense of unity to this work.


Potty Training In One Week
Potty Training In One Week
by Gina Ford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.24

47 of 58 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Potty trained in one week....who is she kidding?, 21 May 2008
You can't fault her style or clarity, but this book should come with a sanity warning. The programme probably does work but (and this is a big but) your child has to be ready and predisposed to the Gina Ford technique. We had followed a lot of her advice in Contented Baby etc and so were pretty positive about it, but, ended up having to abandon the Gina Ford way of potty training because of the tantrums and tears (and not just the baby's). To be fair, the book makes it clear you can potty-train in one week...but only if your child is ready. And there's lots of good advice on familiarising your child with what will happen and sensible comments on how parents need to prepare themselves too. But nothing really your health visitor couldn't tell you or which you couldn't get off the net. And I think there's another caveat. Your child has to have the "right" personality. My son is very wilful and we abandoned the Gina Ford technique on our third attempt. Her answer would probably be "well, then he isn't ready," but at nearly 3 he should be (our health visitor agrees and, believe me I have devoted weeks to it pretty much full time). All following the Gina Ford method has achieved (apart from making us feel bad)is a power struggle and we are now having to back-track and try to undo some of the damage. No doubt it works well for some, but they're probably the kids who would be easy to potty train in any case.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 19, 2009 11:11 PM BST


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