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Asp K

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ZyXEL WRE2205 N300 Wireless Range Extender/Repeater
ZyXEL WRE2205 N300 Wireless Range Extender/Repeater
Offered by Box Limited
Price: 20.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Temperamental, 24 May 2013
I set up one of these in our office with a Zyxel G1000 wireless AP to extend the range. It appeared to go well, until I tested it with a laptop. I had local network access, but no Internet. It took several frustrating hours of trying to get the Internet to work, including updating firmware and so on. A ridiculously painful experience! Fianlly, I got everything working fine and went home from work. The next day - no Internet access, and no-one could join the network.

Looking at the other reviews, success or failure with this device seems to depend on the type of router or access point it's connected to. Mine was connected to an access point, and it just couldn't handle it. So be careful.


No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Cheap fix that does the job., 15 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Although not quite the same quality as the original genuine Apple part, the differences are neligible, which makes this a good, cost effective solution. Replacing a back glass on the iPhone is simple (unlike the front glass). All you need is a screw driver with which to unscrew two screws. However, the screwdriver provided with this was "star" profile, while the screws on my phone were "+". I received one the one screwdriver with this package, as opposed to the array of tools shown in the picture. However, that was a minor issue.


10.80V,5200mAh,Li-ion,Replacement Laptop Battery for HP 550, HP COMPAQ Business Notebook 6720s, 6720s/CT, 6730s, 6730s/CT, 6735s, 6820s, 6830s, Compatible Part Numbers: 451085-141, 451086-121, 451086-161, 451568-001, GJ655AA, HSTNN-IB51, HSTNN-IB52
10.80V,5200mAh,Li-ion,Replacement Laptop Battery for HP 550, HP COMPAQ Business Notebook 6720s, 6720s/CT, 6730s, 6730s/CT, 6735s, 6820s, 6830s, Compatible Part Numbers: 451085-141, 451086-121, 451086-161, 451568-001, GJ655AA, HSTNN-IB51, HSTNN-IB52
Offered by TradeMarket
Price: 10.26

4.0 out of 5 stars Does the job., 15 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I don't know how long this battery will work, but it's been working fine for a few days and that is certainly is an improvment to the dead battery that was in my 6370s Notebook. The notebook itself is four years old and has seen some wear, and is certainly not worth fitting with an expensive genuine HP battery which would set me back at over 100. This cheap alternative will do just fine.

Thanks for this.


Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955
Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955
Price: 110.61

18 of 26 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A game changer...and may be not for the better., 2 Feb 2013
A good, solid operating system ruined by intrusive privacy issues and a tablet interface stuck on top of it.

Microsoft have finally decided to fundamentally change the architecture of Windows in order to steer its users towards fullfilling the corporation's long term stategic business plans. The changes in Windows 8 have little to do with giving desktop users what they need - they are about Microsoft achieving its own goals of market dominance and power. Ok, Windows 8 may not force users to use the online log on, the SmartScreen filter, and the new "Metro" interface, but the architecture is there, poised and ready, and the users are being channel into using it. This approach is a typical migration tactic used by corporations like Microsoft. If you're wondering what the SmartScreen filter is, it's something that checks what software you are installing and using, and which Microsoft can uninstall if it contravenes their new, heavy-handed EULA. It's not really your computer to do what you want with anymore. Consider it to be desktp PC, transforming itself into an oversized iPad, complete with its proprietary "app" store.

Not only are there proprietary and privacy issues affecting Windows 8 users. I am a long time user of Microsoft products and have been using Windows since 3.11 days. I have invested a subtantial amount of money in Windows based software over the last decade or so, and more importantly a lot of time learning how to use all this software. It almost becomes a way of life, so ingrained to the point where I had come to take the flexibility and openess of the Windows platfrom for granted. Windows 8 threatens that I must drop all that and start over, simply because some bean counters there have come up with a new idea they think is "exciting". To me, it feels like it's been forced down my neck. You may say I have a choice, but do I really? What choice would that be? The choice not to accept a EULA, and abandon the platform and legacy of Windows dependant software that I need for my job? It is not a choice because there is no viable alternative. And yes, I'm angry.

Will be sticking to Windows 7 for as long as it seems reasonable to do, and hopefully things will have changed for the better by then. That depends on you. I'm not optimistic. Sorry for the rant.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 1, 2013 12:47 AM GMT


Microsoft Windows 8 Standard 64 bit OEM, WN7-00403, English Version
Microsoft Windows 8 Standard 64 bit OEM, WN7-00403, English Version
Offered by UNLIMITED COMPUTERS
Price: 85.99

133 of 154 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Needs improvement :/, 20 Jan 2013
Looking at the reviews, I see the same pattern I am seeing all over the Internet. A more or less 50 v 50 split amongst the users. They either love it or hate it. It seems that those users who tend to use the PC like a tablet, for casual surfing, sharing on Facebook and those kind of things in general find the new interface pleasant, especially if they have a touch screen to go with it.

However, another segment of users, who use PCs for productivity, such as devlopers, programmers, graphics artists etc are the one's who tend not to be so impressed. I belong to this group, and I have to say that the new UI doesn't help my workflow at all. It slows it up. I am a big iPhone user and so far that has taken care of my mobile needs, and casual surfing needs, although I could do with something larger like an mini iPad. But I see no reason to bring bring a mobile touch interface to the desktop! The problem starts with the missing the start button, which means you constantly have to click back and forth between two different operating systems looking for applications, for a totally inconsistent experience. Where can I find a complete list of software that is installed on my PC? Where's the recent documents list? Why do applications now open in full screen? All this just makes me lose my train of thought. On Windows 7 and just about every other desktop OS, can easily tell whether an application is running or not by simply spotting its window. The idea of multi-tasking was also greatly supported by the fact that you could have many windows open at the same time in whatever form you desired (overlapped, tiled, stacked) and still see the content of the windows you were interested in. With windows 8, instead of having customisable screen areas defined by us, we now have each single application taking up the entire screen. There is a split screen option but this is not anywhere close to the flexibility of the thirty year old concept of Windows.

A related issue is application management. In Windows 7 we are in control of which applications are running. Windows 8 introduces for the first time "mainstream application suspension". The moment we switch away the system decides what to do with the background application and in most cases it will be immediately suspended. It seems to me that Microsoft decided to find all the bad things in the iOS and put them on a PC. It's criminal. Basically our applications and our ways to use them are being dumbed down. For me it simply goes to show that Microsoft is way out of touch with its business users. Maybe we are entering an era of such simplified UIs, I for myself can only say I consider the previous window concept far superior in comparison as to what the industry is apparently heading to.

If you want to try Windows 8, however, then this product is the one to go for. Avoid the upgrade! OS upgrades can be problematic - especially in light of the fact that this new OS has quite demanding hardware requirements. Besides, you might regret getting rid of Windows 7...
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 4, 2013 8:29 PM BST


Windows 8 Standard Edition to Windows 8 Pro Pack, Upgrade Edition [Product key card only] (PC)
Windows 8 Standard Edition to Windows 8 Pro Pack, Upgrade Edition [Product key card only] (PC)
Offered by TechnicalTraders
Price: 70.00

7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not for productivity!, 20 Jan 2013
It seems that those users who tend to use the PC like a tablet, for casual surfing, sharing on Facebook and those kind of things in general find the new interface pleasant, especially if they have a touch screen to go with it. However, the other segment of users, who use PCs for productivity, such as example devlopers, programmers, graphics artists etc are the one's who tend not to be impressed. I belong to this group, and I have to say that the new UI doesn't help my workflow at all. I am a big iPhone user and so far that has taken care of my mobile needs, and casual surfing needs, although I could do with something like an mini iPad. All serious productivity gets done on a PC with Windows 7, with a keyboard and a mouse. I work with high-end graphics software and I seriously cannot see any benefit from the new UI, so if Windows 8 were something I had to use, I'd be looking for ways to chnage the usability of it so that it had the same natural feel as Windows 8. Fortunately we have several computers so there is no need for me to do that, but I am concerned about the direction Microsoft are apparently heading with Windows 8.

Windows 8 is an unsuccessful attempt to fuse two OSs that are designed two entirely different purposes. It alienated a large segment of its user base. Now what?
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 10, 2013 3:44 PM GMT


PANASONIC - EEUFC1E821 - CAPACITOR, 820UF 25V
PANASONIC - EEUFC1E821 - CAPACITOR, 820UF 25V
Offered by go4products
Price: 4.20

5.0 out of 5 stars A Brilliant Capacitor, 4 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this capacitor to replace one that was on the power regulator board of my 19" widescreen monitor, and which had burned out. After replacing it, the capacitor has lasted longer than the original one did, which kind of proves that is good quality.


Sketching Interiors: From Traditional to Digital
Sketching Interiors: From Traditional to Digital
by Suining Ding
Edition: Paperback
Price: 45.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Guide to Architectural Drawing, 4 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Since I bought it two years ago, this book seems to have worked it's way into my number one reference book for drawing. As an art teacher who has many books on the subject, that's saying a lot. It has an excellent chapter on shading, and is filled with examples of the drawings in architectural style which are inspring and are possible to achieve by anyone who is motivated to study the book and spend some time practicing.


Working the Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business
Working the Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business
by Eileen Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: 13.59

2.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as they are saying, 4 Dec 2012
Although I occasionally found some good information and advice, this is a book that has no structure and no real depth. It seems to be a collection of articles and notes loosely strung together. It is peppered with hundreds of disjointed grey boxes comprising bullet lists of information or one liners, often repeating what has already been said in other boxes. Diagrams are not fully explained. The chapter titles seem arbitrary, with the first one suggesting that the book provides guidance in the forming of a social media strategy, and yet on reading the entire book I found very little discussion on that. At times the book delves into interesting matters, such as copyright and B2B, but at others seems no more than a basic introduction to the Internet, often digressing into history of ICQ, Web 2.0 and bulletin boards. There is also an autobiographical section which is not relevant or interesting. The book appears to be written by an IT person rather than a marketing stategist -- and it shows. Together these factors make the book difficult to use either academically or practically. It functions as hit-and-miss reference book of tips.

I found the book partially useful because the tips are often good, based on honest experience, but I was disappointed because I expected much more.


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