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John Ireland

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The Bread Book
The Bread Book
by Linda Collister
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My copy is getting quite stained, 20 Oct. 2006
This review is from: The Bread Book (Hardcover)
My copy is getting quite stained now. A good sign that it's actually useful for what it claims on the cover "A step-by-step guide to making" bread. The action photos are clear, as are the instructions - including explicit alternatives for fresh, dried and easy-blend yeast. Good range of breads and some nice plain shots of the finished products. There are some romantic pictures of bakers too if you like Hovis ads. Ignore the really awful staged pictures of bread with flowers, candles and rustic apples.


Human Traces
Human Traces
by Sebastian Faulks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.83

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where's Sigmund?, 20 Sept. 2006
This review is from: Human Traces (Paperback)
Quick march through late 19th centrury psychiatry and neuroscience before ending up in Faulks' familar First World War stomping ground. Strangely fails to mention Freud by name despite comprehensively duffing him up.


Things Can Only Get Better: Eighteen Miserable Years in the Life of a Labour Supporter, 1979-1997
Things Can Only Get Better: Eighteen Miserable Years in the Life of a Labour Supporter, 1979-1997
by John O'Farrell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.28

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Things can only get better, 31 Aug. 2006
Like John O'Farrell, I missed voting in the 1979 election by the accident of being born too late. Unlike him, I got round to joining the Labour Party a few moths after Mrs T took the piss out of St Francis on the steps of Number 10, but that's a mere detail. My late teens / early 20s "growing pains" were similar to his. I too suspected that flowers were "right" wing - still do in fact. I was a member of Battersea CLP (but in the next ward along from Queenstown) at what must have been roughly the same time as him - and yes, reading the Alf Dubbs saga brought tears to my eyes (again). So this book was a very personal read for me. Not because I knew John O'Farrell nor most of the people he mentions - though some of the names were familiar and I did live across the square from Martin Linton (who was admired from afar at ward meetings - what else for a person who wrote for the Gruniad?). Creating personal affinity through "shared" experiences must be the knack of writing a book like this. Easier for Nick Hornby as affinity with football is widespread and it seems OK for men to get soppy about Fulham, Rangers or whatever. Much less so with pinkco politics whose adherents are spread thinner. Just for the record, I left Battersea before John O'Farrell after serving my time as assistant membership secretary (my highest office in the Labour Party!). A few years later, I left London too. The rest is history, but I do miss Clause Four on the back of my membership card.


Dot.Con: The Real Story of Why the Internet Bubble Burst
Dot.Con: The Real Story of Why the Internet Bubble Burst
by John Cassidy
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Con of a Dot.con book, 5 May 2003
I'm not totally convinced by this book. Emily Bell's Observer review notes that much of this book is taken from secondary sources. There's nothing wrong in that - though a good number of the sources are fairly accessible and obvious. The value added comes from the way in which the theme of financial speculation and manias is used to structure the book's history of the "Internet bubble". Again the sources used are obvious, but it's a neat narrative trick. The book's other strength is that the narrative is wide ranging, although at times I felt that the breadth stretched my credulity, such as the material on William Gibson and cyperpunk. In the end though I found the book's almost circular reasoning on the bubble unsatisfying. In particular I remain unconvinced of the role that Cassidy attributes to the Fed and Alan Greenspan .


Bread
Bread
by Eric Treuille
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Definitely in the Dorling Kindersley style, 5 May 2003
This review is from: Bread (Hardcover)
I first read this book in the small hours while rolling around with stomach ache on the bathroom floor of a hotel near Tarbet. Despite that I enjoyed this book's approach. There is a definite Dorling Kindersley style and when they get it right the style works. I think that's the case here. The photography is particularly good: clear close-ups of basic steps such as kneeding, dough at various stages of its life and the and shaping of loaves. There is useful general material on technique, equipment and ingredients too. This book works well in the kitchen - the instructions are clear and the recipes tend to turn out well.


Official Motorcycling Compulsory Basic Training, Theory and Practical Test (Driving Skills)
Official Motorcycling Compulsory Basic Training, Theory and Practical Test (Driving Skills)
by Driving Standards Agency
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading, but buy some Post It notes first, 27 Oct. 2002
Driver education has moved on apace in the two decades since I learnt to drive a car. No bad thing really. "Essential skills" starts off with basic material such as bike controls, types of bike and clothing amost at a pre-CBT level. More CBT material - but this time on actually riding the bike - is covered in the next couple of chapters. Gradually the book moves onto systems - OSM, PSL etc and their application to various traffic situations. For me these were the best parts of the book - clear explanations and good graphics. The book closes with chapters on riding in various conditions and on motorways, plus travel in Europe and the environment. On my second pass through the "systems" chapters I became fustrated by the organisation and marked various pages - typically those that applied the system - with post it notes. This made subsequent use of the book far easier.


Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America - A Memoir
Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America - A Memoir
by Elizabeth Wurtzel
Edition: Paperback

10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Mind candy, 27 Oct. 2002
Spike Milligan (in his book with Anthony Clare) says that it's well nigh impossible after the event to describe accurately what he felt like when depressed. That thought kept running through my mind as I read the 300 odd pages describing Wurtzel's experience. After 100 pages it was joined by Wurtzel's own view that her friends must be fed up with her screaming that she wants to die. They weren't, but I was. Read the Prologue, the final two chapters (on how Prozac started to work for Wurtzel) and the Epilogue on the widespread use of Prozac (including the advent of feline sized prescriptions) plus a few random pages and you'll get all you need from this book. Kay Redfield Jamison's book covers similar ground (though for a bipolar manic depressive rather than a unipolar depressive) and does a far better job. It's clearer on the links between mania / depression, the perception of self and more acute on her feelings about medication. Perhaps Jamison's day job as a psychiatrist helps, though Wurtzel's day job ought to have helped her write something better.


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