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Miss N. Doshi (UK)
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Asus VS228DE 21.5 inch Widescreen 1080p Full HD LED Monitor (1920x1080, 5ms, VGA)
Asus VS228DE 21.5 inch Widescreen 1080p Full HD LED Monitor (1920x1080, 5ms, VGA)
Price: £78.38

2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars, 30 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Colour is not right - either too red or too bright.


Adult Somali Pirate Fancy Dress Costume Mens Pirates Outfit
Adult Somali Pirate Fancy Dress Costume Mens Pirates Outfit
Offered by Simply Fancy Dress
Price: £29.99

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Perfect costume for racists!, 30 Mar. 2015
This is the perfect outfit if you want to prove to your friends that you're a better racist that they are! It's designed especially for all you very insecure peoples who need to put down another culture and the problems that they face in order to boost your ego.


Going South: Why Britain will have a Third World Economy by 2014
Going South: Why Britain will have a Third World Economy by 2014
by Larry Elliott
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.59

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but lacking in-depth analysis, 17 April 2013
The authors' assessment of what it means to be a developing nation fails continuously to take into regard the power aspects of being "third world" - that which goes beyond the mere economic and instead drives the hegemonic. Britain's role in Imperial history is the cause of it's "developed" nature. That needs to be stated clearly and is not.

Otherwise a succinct argument on why Britain will economically fail soon, although its anti-immigrant stance leaves a somewhat bitter taste in my mouth.


Ecozone Biobulb, Energy-Saving Daylight Bulb, Screw Cap E27, 25W Equivalent to 100w, 1750 Lumens, Full Spectrum, Daylight White 6500k, Uses 75% Less Energy. Ideal for suffers of S.A.D
Ecozone Biobulb, Energy-Saving Daylight Bulb, Screw Cap E27, 25W Equivalent to 100w, 1750 Lumens, Full Spectrum, Daylight White 6500k, Uses 75% Less Energy. Ideal for suffers of S.A.D
Price: £9.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very bright & useful bulb!, 21 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As I use this to work on grey days, I find that the brightness of the bulb works like a charm while the curtains remain open. It does get a little more hospital like at night, due to the white light, but then I use a lower voltage lamp to even out the colour. Very useful purchase!


Delonghi HTF3033 3 Kilowatt Horizontal Fan Heater
Delonghi HTF3033 3 Kilowatt Horizontal Fan Heater
Offered by GADAZZLE
Price: £26.75

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strong & Powerful, 21 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Strong fan heater that heats up room very quickly. Also works as a standalone fan which would be very useful in Summer. The only problem is the heater is arranged at an angle, and so doesn't warm up the floor as much as I would like it.

However, if you're just looking for a quick room heater for those colder months when you don't want to turn on all the heating, this should be your first buy.


Politics of Origin in Africa: Autochthony, Citizenship and Conflict
Politics of Origin in Africa: Autochthony, Citizenship and Conflict
by Morten Boas
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant alternative to standard New Wars rhetoric, 21 Mar. 2013
As a student at LSE, much of the reading I have done on African conflict politics has ended up focussing on New Wars theory. This book is a good example of a radical alternative that looks at the complications of the colonial legacy as the origins of conflict rather than repeating the economic globalisation narrative espoused by Kaldor, Duffield et al. Colonial governance, argue the authors, created fixed ethnic categories which over time had become intertwined with fixed borders. Land ownership and ethnicity therefore were hard to disentangle, and points of conflict are now expressed through these land disputes rather than due to identity clashes. This is actively shown across various countries in Africa.

It's only a shame that the authors did not cover Rwanda as it would have been useful to see how their analysis would have been applied onto the genocide, and tensions since then.

I am not convinced, however, that the authors are right, but the fact that it's an alternative that doesn't jump straight into the hands of neo-realism is very very refreshing.


Race, Racism and Development: Interrogating history, discourse and practice
Race, Racism and Development: Interrogating history, discourse and practice
by Kalpana Wilson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling read on material & embodied racisms within development, 3 Feb. 2013
Kalpana Wilson's study of race, racism and development is a highly readable academic treatise that questions the core of neoliberal development. Grounded in Marxist analyses and based on work by Global South scholars, she presents a compelling argument of how development has continued the scientific racisms of colonialism.

She presents her argument beautifully - addressing the often ignored origins of development, the insectionalities of race/class/gender that so typically mark development work, and even how postdevelopment works involve the same racisms that are prevalent within development despite the desire to move away from them.

My main critique is that I think she somewhat fails to engage with postcolonial scholarship on the matter with enough depth. Her easy dismissal of the literature as "Foucauldian" and therefore not creating a sense of material inequality makes the discussion of the production of knowledge argument weak. I also feel she fails to really take on board some of the more complex literature of postcolonialists have added to the pre-existing Marxist literature on race & development.

That said, the ease of reading is remarkable, and full of examples. This is a book on the study of APPLIED development, not merely another treatise of idealistic hope or political theory.


A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently
A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently
by Robert V. Levine
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.91

5.0 out of 5 stars easy reading & filled with curiousity, 20 Mar. 2012
Dive into this book if you're looking for an adventure!

People rarely tell you about how time really works. Until I read this book, much of my thinking was very fixated around clock-time. I was aware of cultural differences (being an archaeologist) but my knowledge of how time was perceived was lacking significantly.

This book is just one of those simple, easy-to-read books that tell you so much through anecdotes. There is nothing I recommend more if you're really interested in time. Compared to this, Hawking is just dull. Time is experienced, not a pretty diagram.


True Country
True Country
by Kim Scott
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite books, 4 Mar. 2012
This review is from: True Country (Paperback)
I studied this as a part of Year 11 English Literature back in Western Australia. The book is a brilliant insight into the divide that pierces white Australia from Aboriginal peoples. Its rich narrative weaves between the main character - an Aboriginal teacher called Billy who was forcibly removed from his people as a child to grow up in a mission & white family - and the interplay with a Noongar community and the other white teachers.

The shallow ignorance of the white Australians foiled against the deep indigenous knowledge of the community elders, the complex culture - specific questions around what defines a good education (knowing the land versus knowing your letters) - and the broader epistemological questions on who we actually are, make this book a great read. This isn't just a story, it's a commentary on contemporary attitudes of white Australia's relationship with indigenous peoples. And it's small peek into the very different worldview of Noongar peoples.

Read it if you genuinely want to understand what social justice and Aboriginal Rights *really* means.


Counterpower
Counterpower
by Tim Gee
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars fun, informative and necessary for a spot of inspiration, 8 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Counterpower (Paperback)
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We are a generation facing failed economic policies, high expenses without the means to pay for them, a lack of employment opportunities that mirrors the Great Depression, and a government that will do anything in its power to silence our complaints. None stand to support us; we are struggling together, but alone. Over the last year, we have been collecting, building movements of resistance, mounting huge campaigns that have brought thousands into forms of direct action. But keeping the momentum going is tiring, and we often need something to inspire us to keep going; stories, anecdotes, history - all of these to bring us hope. And that is why Tim Gee's Counterpower is an important read.

Counterpower is a collection of histories, anecdotes and records of social resistance movements. From the beginning to the end, Tim details small and large resistance movements, from how India gained Independence to the most recent Egyptian "Revolution". Not all of them are successful, and some are just a a hundred words long. The book provides a great introduction to social resistance movements, and coupled with Tim's personal anecdotes - it's light but informative reading.

Plus if you're looking for something not so introductory, Tim's book is a great starting point. For every tale told, there is a clear link to where that information can be found. For example, one of my favourite tales is actually quite accessible online:

"During the First World War, landlords in Glasgow decided to introduce massive ret increases in response to the influx of women moving to the city... resolved to pay only their rent and not the increase... They set up a number of sound signals to summon protesters at a moment's notice, and then squeezed into narrow passageways to blockade the bailiffs' path... Shortly afterwards, the Rent Restriction Act was passed, fixing rents throughout the UK at their pre-war level." (pp 28 - 29; or sourced here)

Where Counterpower falls down, however is in its argument. Tim is not only seeking to provide a history of creating change, but also to explain the methodology of how it is achieved. His argument follows the well-trodden path of categorising these methods into what he calls "Idea Counterpower" (hegemony), "Economic Counterpower," and "Physical Counterpower" (direct action). Though he tries to weave each of his narratives into this overly simplistic analysis, it is clear that this method doesn't always fit. Often Tim is guilty of just boxing the methods of social resistance used rather than successfully trying to understand the actions' historical relevance.

Tim clearly researched for this book: reading autobiographies of those involved, thumbing through Gene Sharp's various publications (as Tim is a Quaker), and investigating personal narratives found online. But there was a distinct lack of analytical depth in the text than comes out quite clearly if you're a student of social change - or an experienced activist. Power is a complex issue that has not been won over just by a single act of direct action; change happens at pivotal points where there are weaknesses, gaps and the crux of imbalance.

For example, Tim does not explain that India received its freedom at a point where ordinary non-Indian Britons were no longer interested in maintaining an outpost in the East. Or that the power of that win perpetuated an imbalance of power in South Asia, where external pressures played an equal part in liberation movements (such as violent protest in the North and the ideological creation of Pakistan). Tim takes each historical reckon as it is, and without significant analysis. A letter from Clement Attlee stating that civil disobedience is what makes India ungovernable may be a way of justifying the action without admitting political or economic failure.

Excluding its analytical flaws, I learned a vast amount of information from Counterpower and I enjoyed the diversity of different social movements Tim Gee explored. The book provides an excellent history of social resistance movements. Equally it's an easy read and a page-turner.

Overall, I recommend that if you haven't read a hundred histories of social resistance movements already, give Counterpower a go. It's fun, informative and necessary for a spot of inspiration. Just don't pay too much attention to the analysis.


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