Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now
Profile for S Wood > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by S Wood
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,980
Helpful Votes: 1916

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
S Wood (Scotland)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
No Way to Run an Economy: Why the System Failed and How to Put It Right
No Way to Run an Economy: Why the System Failed and How to Put It Right
by Graham Turner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Roots And Remedies, 10 July 2010
Presently, with the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition in power in the UK, it seems that the roots of the current economic woes in The Credit Crunch have been consigned to some dark recess, while "our" government gears itself up to apply what is perhaps best described as a Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) to the United Kingdom, one that will make the IMF's intervention in the Labour Government (1976) seem like a picnic. Graham Turner, with over twenty years experience of working in the financial sector, is well qualified to bring the reader back to the reality of the problems roots, and how they continue to effect the global economy, with particular emphasis on the situation in the United States and the United Kingdom.

While the current focus is on government debt Turner reminds us that the problems relating to mortgages, consumer debt, interest and the availability of credit are far from happily resolved. His many graphs indicate a number of continuing problems, such as the fact that financial sectors writing down of problem mortgage and consumer debt has diverged from the growing levels of debt delinquency in order for banks to declare increases in profitability.

With regard to the longer term issues that have been at the root of the credit crunch Turner identifies a number of issues such as globalisations negative effect on wages as a share of GDP, the impetus this shortfall has provided for the increasing levels of consumer debt, and the lack of controls with regard to the financial sector. He also reflects on the Marxist and Keynesian analysis of the credit crunch.

As for solutions, Turner thinks that a substantial increase in quantitive easing is the least worst way of ensuring that the economies of the US and UK dont enter into a deflationary spiral reminiscent of Japan in the 1990's and beyond. He is also in favour of reforming the current shareholder model of corporate capitalism in favour of one that democratically reflects the interests of workers and the wider community, the meaningful nationalisation of banks, and modifications to the global economic structures to provide space for the meaningful participation of employees in the economic sphere.

"No Way To Run The Economy" is a fascinating read. The statistically minded will be in seventh heaven with Turners 70+ graphs that concisely illustrate much of what is discussed in the text. The shortcomings of this book are that it is too short for the breadth of the subject, and it also (presumably to be optimally relevant upon publication) appears to have been written in a bit of a hurry. Some complicated matters are well explained, others left this reader scratching his head, and while the glossary is welcome it is far from exhaustive. Despite these flaws, Turner has written a valuable and informative book that is a good bit more relevant to the economic problems we face than any amount of George Osbornes or Vince Cables babblings ever will be.


Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World
Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World
by David Brion Davis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New World Slavery, 24 Jun. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Describing the rise and fall of slavery in the New World in a mere 320 pages is a demanding project for a historian, and one that David Brion Davis largely (with a few caveats) accomplishes with no small amount of skill in his book "Inhuman Bondage".

The books begins with the Amistad case from the late 1830's which is somewhat at odds with the Spielberg version, though far more interesting and revealing for being so. Davis then makes room to contemplate the roots of slavery in the Near East, the Greek and Roman Empires, and on through history until it erupted into the New World with the "discoveries" of the late fifteenth century. This, for me, was the highlight of the book, and also includes reflections on the interaction between slavery and racism (and the accompanying arguments between cause and effect) as well as examining the Christian, Islamic, Jewish, Ancient World and Enlightenment views of race and slavery.

As regards the main subject of the book, slavery in the New World, Davis focuses on the North American experience, followed by that of the Caribbean, with Brazilian slavery in the rear. Spanish slavery, except in so far as it applied to the Caribbean, is largely absent. Other subjects that receive attention are Slave revolts in the various colonies, the role of the Haitian revolt in the demise of Slavery, British and other European emancipation, the debates about the role slavery played in the industrial revolution, the American Civil War and emancipation, as well as the astonishing case of the Brazilian slave revolt that brought about emancipation in that country, the last in the Western hemisphere to do so. Paradoxically the actual day-to-day realities of the slaves and slavery remain relatively untouched by the text.

I didn't agree with all of Davis's analysis, but to his credit he makes the reader aware of other historical views even if his dismissal of the connections between slavery and industrialisation is more than a little heavy handed. The book only truly irked with regard to Davis's opinion on the Turner rebellion; his remark that the massacres of whites was brutal and counterproductive is reasonable, but to then go on an claim that this was little different psychologically from the mental state that leads to the genocide of Jews, is to put it politely, a grotesque overstatement. For a start the Nazis were not treated by the Jewish people in the way that White Americans treated Black slaves. If Davis himself applied this assertion systematically his account of the Haitian revolt would have been very different, and less enlightening for that. He certainly doesn't apply it to the putting down of Slave revolts, including those in the British Caribbean where hundreds of blacks died, many cold bloodedly executed in response to wide spread insurrections that resulted in less than a handful of white deaths.

In short, "Inhuman Bondage" is a thoroughly interesting exploration of New World slavery. As a book its fascinating and enlightened scholarship easily out-weigh its occasional defects. The accounts of the roots of slavery in the old world are easily, and somewhat perversely given the books title, the highlight of the book. Readers interested in reading further into the subject can do no worse than Robin Blackburn's dense but comprehensive The Making of New World Slavery; for the Haitian revolt C.L.R. James The Black Jacobins is still a remarkable account; those interested in the experience of the North American mainland will find that Peter Kolchin's American Slavery (1619-1877) will supply the details that are largely absent from Davis's account, and Eric Foner's Reconstruction is an immensely detailed account of the post-emancipation experience of American blacks.


House of Cards: How Wall Street's Gamblers Broke Capitalism
House of Cards: How Wall Street's Gamblers Broke Capitalism
by William D. Cohan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.08

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bearing All?, 24 Jun. 2010
William D. Cohan, a journalist for the Financial Times and Fortune magazine and formerly an "investment" banker on Wall Street, has written an account of the financial company Bear Sterns from its inception to its demise during the initial stages of the recent financial crisis.

Cohans starts of his tale at the end with an account of the goings on as Bear Sterns attempted to stave of liquidation before going on to tell the story of it's inception and life, finally ending on where it began with the companies demise, as well as an ostensibly broader picture of the credit crunch kicking in.

Unfortunately Cohan is unable to transcend his background as an insider and financial journalist and makes little effort, not even a glossary, to describe the terms that he throws around the text with gay abandon, for those without a background in finance, or a working knowledge of the large lexicon of financial terminology. The impression is of someone who, in a manner of speaking, is in love (with perhaps a dash of hate) with the world of high finance (quite literally for the apparently dope smoking Bear Sterns CEO James Cayne) and has written a book primarily for insiders. The compensation package for the financially illiterate is a stirring narrative, of rich, hard working, foul mouthed and folksy bankers, studded with quotation after quotation from many of the main characters in the tragedy, or more likely farce, that makes up Bear Sterns life and death.

With regard to broader issues beyond the internal world of Bear Sterns and Wall Street Cohan is silent, or fairly asinine. The perspective is one that seems unable to step outside the collection of received wisdoms that make up the free-market mantras of Wall Street. Personally if I heard another CEO of a belly up banking company mouth platitudes about the fate of his employees, given the fate of the average American employee under Wall Streets regime, I was going to puke up.

A compelling enough read, but like many of the main personalities of the story, one that is essentially hollow and un-enlightening with the exception of what one can garner by reading between the lines. Personally I'll be looking elsewhere for the story of the credit crunch.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 16, 2010 3:17 PM BST


The People's War: Britain 1939-1945: Britain, 1939-45
The People's War: Britain 1939-1945: Britain, 1939-45
by Angus Calder
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.41

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lost Worlds, 16 Jun. 2010
I had a sense, when reading Angus Calder's seminal "The Peoples War", of not just visiting one lost world (that of the home front during the second world war), but also that of the time the book was written in, late 1960's Britain; and not just because of (thankfully rare) sentences such as "For the New Britain rearmament meant a gay boom in aircraft production." The books discussions of the social and economic circumstances of wartime Britain are clearly written in pre-Neo Liberal times, when a mixed economy, a welfare state, and social cohesion were regarded as the norm. One could hardly imagine a writer tackling the vast subject of the home front in quite the same manner as Angus Calder did forty years ago, and his book is none the worse for that. On the contrary therein lies much of it's value in that "The Peoples War" allows the reader a double dose of time travelling: explicitly to the wartime 1940's, and implicitly to the post-war consensus that was still alive when this book was written.

At nearly 600 pages plus footnotes, bibliographical essay and index this book is difficult to pick up, but it is even more difficult to put down. Calder chronicles the home front in Britain, from the phoney war (called "The Bore War" at the time) to the general election which saw a landslide victory for the Labour Party in summer 1945, and reflects on a number of events in-between including the ascendancy of Churchill, the Battle of Britain and the Blitz, rationing, evacuation, the mobilization of people and economy for the wartime struggle, the planning for a "peoples" post war Britain that would embrace all classes, and the V-weapon attacks.

Calder makes use of a vast amount of sources including Government records, the archives of Mass Observation whose job it was to gauge the mood of the British throughout the war, newspapers and memoirs. This vast mountain of information is intermixed with revealing and apposite anecdotes, and rendered in a readable prose that is at times melancholy and sad, though just as often wry and funny.

It's heartening that this piece of exemplarily social and political writing is still in print after four decades. It gives the reader a many-dimensioned picture of the effect that the war had on the home front. Additionally it tells the story of how the post-war consensus including education, social security, the National Health Service, nationalisation, etc went through its birth pangs. A good part of British Politics since the mid 1970's has been the story of the rolling back of the gains made during the war and in the immediate post war years, and part of the importance of this book is in its telling the story of how that consensus came about. A well recommended read.


The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better For Everyone
The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better For Everyone
by Richard Wilkinson
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inequality Corrodes Society, 7 Jun. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett have put the question of inequality under the spotlight in their fine study, "The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone". The focus of their efforts is on the richer nations, essentially those that are in the OECD. They make a strong case for the correlation between the amount of inequality in a country, and the incidence of a number of social problems ranging from teenage pregnancies and drug use, to life expectancy, depression and obesity. Not only that, but they make a case for the fact that people across all income levels in the more equal societies benefit - not just those at the lower income levels.

Wilkinson and Pickett buttress their assertions with a vast array of data. In some cases the correlation between inequality and social problems is very strong, for example between income inequality and rates of imprisonment, in others it is merely pretty strong. There are a few exceptions, but the general case for the link between inequality and a variety of damaging social problems is concluisively made.

Identifying the reason for link between inequality and social problems, disentangling cause and effect, is more problematic. The authors make quite strong cases in some instances, but in others the link is of a more speculative. More studies evidently need to be carried out.

The moral of this story: that inequality is damaging to society seems self-evident, at least to this reader. The novelty in this book is the volume of data accumulated to back the argument, and the number of social issues examined. It puts defenders of the unequal societies we live in, particularly the Anglo-Saxon countries, on the back foot during any discussions of inequality. One can see this vividly expressed if one clicks on the one-star reviews of this book, the paucity of the response is impressive.

On the downside, it was a disappointment that only rich countries were fully investigated, though the volume and quality of data available from these countries is no doubt of a more comprehensive nature. Certainly (from the data at the beginning of the book) the correlation between social indicators and inequality in less developed countries appears just as, if not more, damaging. The ideas that the authors propose for remedying the situation are of a tentative nature, and rightly so. They are presenting the data; it is the responsibility of society at large to debate these issues, and hopefully for the debate to go beyond the platitudes of the professional political class, the constraints imposed by the corporate media, and other vested interests in an unequal society. To this end the authors along with others have formed the Equality Trust, details of which are in the book.

A fine book, which clearly presents arguments and data in a way that should be clear to even the most statistically challenged reader. Other books that examine the links between wealth and social problems that are worth reading include those by Oliver James who has been probing these issues, particularly with regard to mental health, for a number of years (see Affluenza and The Selfish Capitalist: Origins of Affluenza).


Hopes and Prospects
Hopes and Prospects
by Noam Chomsky
Edition: Hardcover

84 of 88 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Voice Of Sanity, 5 Jun. 2010
This review is from: Hopes and Prospects (Hardcover)
Eighty-one years old last December, and showing no sign of easing up on his Stahkanovite work rate, Noam Chomsky has recently published "Hopes and Prospects" - his latest collection of writing on global affairs. As usual Chomsky doesn't focus his scrutiny on official enemies, that would be too easy though no doubt rewarding (at least financially), but takes the more serious responsibility of looking into the rhetoric and reality of his own countries contributions to the world.

Rather than referring to Barack "The Audacity of Hype" Obama, the "hope" of the title refers to developments in Latin America that Chomsky covers in the first section of this book. Indeed at least the first two chapters appear to be transcripts of talks given in Chile. When Obama comes into view the prospect is less one of hope, but of the massive gulf between the rhetoric of his campaign (which in all truth was woolly enough) and the reality of his record in government. His treasury team including former architects and direct beneficiaries of the financial deregulation of the 1980's and 90's (e.g. Lawrence Summers and Robert Rubin) is mirrored in the pitiful nature of the changes to the regulatory system (essentially business as usual) and the unaccountable nature of the banks recent feeding frenzy at public expense.

Beyond the hopes in Latin America and the hype of Barack Obama, Chomsky finds space to consider the United States recent and ongoing interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq; developments in the Middle East, with attention to the attack on Gaza, the attack on Lebanon, and the Obama administrations policy vis-à-vis the Palestinian-Israel conflict; the grotesque hypocrisy of the United States policy regarding the Nuclear issue and Iran; the fate of Obamas one radical policy, his attempt to reform health provision; and the twentieth anniversary celebrations of the events of 1989, where he quotes from a Central American writer that if that celebrant of American foreign policy Vaclev Havel had been active in one of the Latin American countries within the United States domain, rather than genuflecting to the Americans at the orgy of self-congratulation that made up the anniversary celebrations, he would have been found dead at the roadside, mutilated and murdered decades ago.

Among the valuable services that Chomsky provides are his endnotes: they are a pointer to many useful resources, publications and books. One example I am looking forward to getting hold of is Malalai Joyas A Woman Among Warlords. Chomsky quotes from her, and other Afghans at length, and her activism in a hostile environment appears truly awesome. This is a book that I have no problem in recommending to anyone who is serious about some of the most pressing issues facing the world today, and who wishes to get beyond rhetoric and hypocrisy to see what is actually going on.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 11, 2011 2:56 PM BST


Kieron Smith, boy
Kieron Smith, boy
by James Kelman
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Life And Opinions o' Smiddy, 5 Jun. 2010
This review is from: Kieron Smith, boy (Hardcover)
It's not often I agree with the blurb on a books dust jacket, but after reading James Kelmans "Kieron Smith, Boy" I feel that I can enthusiastically endorse the claims made that he is "the greatest British novelist of our times". The hero of the book is one Kieron Smith, younger son of a family who live in the Glasgow (presumably) of the 1950's. It charts his experiences, conflicts and thoughts as related by him, from the age when he is in the middle years of primary school to his early years at secondary.

This is an extraordinary performance on Kelmans behalf; the reader is thrust into the scuffed shoes of Kieron and will find it difficult to take them off, at least voluntarily. The book is utterly absorbing, and as someone who was once a boy himself, though an east coaster rather than a west coaster, and who grew up a few decades later, I found myself constantly back in my own past as well as transfixed by Kierons story. The re-creation of the young boys mentality that Kelman has put into writing is an awesome artistic achievement.

The book is at times melancholy, such as when Kierons granda is enduring his last hospital bound illness, but can often be hilarious such as when Kierons ruminates on religion, principally the differences between "Papes and Proddies", a running theme in his mind, and realistically so given the location of his childhood. The account of life in inner city Glasgow before moving to an out of town scheme, at school, in the tenement flat, at his gran and grandas, his conflicts with his older brother and parents, and those within Kierons head never once struck this reader as anything less than completely real.

Non-Glaswegian readers will be grateful to Kierons mammy, whose constant needling of Kierons pronunciation and nagging in the cause of "proper" English are reflected in Kierons narrative voice. Even swear words are asterisked out, at least until Kieron is away to secondary school.

A short review cant do justice to such a substantial, compulsively and compelling work of fiction. I had thought that Roddy Doyles Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha was the last word in fiction from the point of view of a child, but Kelman has excelled beyond even that high standard in this marvellous novel. Well recommended.


Kieron Smith, boy
Kieron Smith, boy
by James Kelman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Life And Opinions o' Smiddy, 5 Jun. 2010
This review is from: Kieron Smith, boy (Paperback)
It's not often I agree with the blurb on a books dust jacket, but after reading James Kelmans "Kieron Smith, Boy" I feel that I can enthusiastically endorse the claims made that he is "the greatest British novelist of our times". The hero of the book is one Kieron Smith, younger son of a family who live in the Glasgow (presumably) of the 1950's. It charts his experiences, conflicts and thoughts as related by him, from the age when he is in the middle years of primary school to his early years at secondary.

This is an extraordinary performance on Kelmans behalf; the reader is thrust into the scuffed shoes of Kieron and will find it difficult to take them off, at least voluntarily. The book is utterly absorbing, and as someone who was once a boy himself, though an east coaster rather than a west coaster, and who grew up a few decades later, I found myself constantly back in my own past as well as transfixed by Kierons story. The re-creation of the young boys mentality that Kelman has put into writing is an awesome artistic achievement.

The book is at times melancholy, such as when Kierons granda is enduring his last hospital bound illness, but can often be hilarious such as when Kierons ruminates on religion, principally the differences between "Papes and Proddies", a running theme in his mind, and realistically so given the location of his childhood. The account of life in inner city Glasgow before moving to an out of town scheme, at school, in the tenement flat, at his gran and grandas, his conflicts with his older brother and parents, and those within Kierons head never once struck this reader as anything less than completely real.

Non-Glaswegian readers will be grateful to Kierons mammy, whose constant needling of Kierons pronunciation and nagging in the cause of "proper" English are reflected in Kierons narrative voice. Even swear words are asterisked out, at least until Kieron is away to secondary school.

A short review cant do justice to such a substantial, compulsively and compelling work of fiction. I had thought that Roddy Doyles Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha was the last word in fiction from the point of view of a child, but Kelman has excelled beyond even that high standard in this marvellous novel. Well recommended.


The World Since 1945: A Complete History of Global Change from 1945 to the Present
The World Since 1945: A Complete History of Global Change from 1945 to the Present
by T.E. Vadney
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Real "Cold" War (Nearly!), 3 Jun. 2010
T.E.Vadneys "The World Since 1945" is an accessible, and generally excellent, overview of the world's historical experience between 1945 and roughly 1985. The book is comprehensive in its coverage of not only key (or apparently key) events in world history, but also for the particular focus Vadney brings to the experiences of the third world.

Vadneys writes from a tradition that can be broadly described as left of centre. It is certainly not dogmatic, for example the standards he holds the United States to are the same as those that he brings to his coverage of the Soviet Union, but it is one that gives the book an internationalist flavour and a tangible concern for those who live in the third world or under oppressive situations of whatever kind. Another strength of the book is that Vadney doesn't let himself become chained to the standard cold war narrative, and the fruits of his freedom from this are excellent accounts of post-war Latin American, Asian (especially Indo China) and African history that deal with external factors in a rational and reasoned manner. This is particularly important given that at the time these countries were struggling for economic and political independence, which Vadney rightly regards as the key theme of the period. He is also excellent at summarising the pre-1945 histories in a way that gives the reader an insight into the historical context within which the developments and events he describes occurred, and also pays serious attention to events internal to nations, as well as those between nations. The generally good coverage of third world countries in the book doesn't preclude Vadney from coherently accounting for events in Europe, North America and within Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.

Unfortunately the book is by no means perfect, there are a few noticeable bloopers (e.g. he states that the Shiites are a minority in Iraq), and in the vast array of events and developments he writes on it is easy to make a case for problems of selection, emphasis, and (less frequently) accuracy. This is most systematic in his coverage of the confrontation in the Middle East between Israel and the Arabs. Vadney, and it was not uncommon amongst apparent lefties at that time and since, follows a line that is sympathetic to the official Israeli discourse to a degree that ought to be a major embarrassment to anyone serious about narrating and explaining historical reality,

In general I find that books of this nature that synthesis a large amount of material in a relatively short space can form an excellent introduction to a subject. In this case the subject is the post-WW2 world, and Vadney not only stimulates a curiosity to discover more about particular developments from third world de-colonisation and economic development, to nuclear weapons and neo-colonialism, but also provides a basic framework for understanding them on a global basis. With the exception of the material that pertains to the Middle East, "The World Since 1945" provides an excellent and intelligent summary of world history for the period that is well worth reading.


Better Day Coming: Blacks and Equality 1890-2000
Better Day Coming: Blacks and Equality 1890-2000
by Adam Fairclough
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.24

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Fight Back From Slavery, 28 May 2010
The focus of Adam Faircloughs book, as is evident from the title "Better Day Coming", is on black efforts at fighting for full citizenship within American society. Things had become extremely bleak for them after the radical Republicans (it was not an oxymoron in the 1860's and 70's) efforts at Reconstruction were defeated, and blacks lost their vote and representatives, land and legal equality. Any attempts at seeking re-dress were brutally put down by Southern Democrats and the Klu Klux Klan. Faircloughs narrative takes the reader from those bleak times through the variety of accommodations and rebellions, dead-ends and progress, that make up the black experience in America up to the end of the twentieth century.

A good deal of this history is focussed on the personalities that stood out in black history, from militants such as the forthright campaigner against lynching Ida B. Wells at one end of the spectrum, to the black Americans Samuel Smiles - Booker T. Washington, with many others including Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey and Martin Luther King. Fairclough doesn't ignore some of the movements (the communist party, the NAACP, the Black Panthers, etc) or events (the civil rights movement, the legal battles, the battle for integration, etc). In short he captures a good deal of the black Americans twentieth century experience and struggle for equality.

If there is a shortcoming in the book it is Fairclough can be on occasions a little wishy-washy in his narrative. Sometimes in his efforts to achieve "balance" he appears a little lame, merely repeating both sides of the argument without making a judgement, or calculating the costs and benefits of actions on the struggle for black equality. In contrast with the events he describes, Fairclough seems to be always on the look out for a silver lining, for the American system, if not for the blacks themselves. As an example consider this quote with regards to the Great Depression - "President Roosevelts vigorous leadership and evident sympathy for the "forgotten Americans" deepened the interest of everyone in politics." Did it really? Or was it the catastrophic economic depression, and the failure of the established political classes, year after year, to find a solution that caused an upsurge in Americans interest in politics? In another case he describes how Martin Luther King bowed to pressure from the Kennedy administration and dismissed two of his advisors and fellow activists who had a communist background, and then without qualification adds, "yet King was nobodies puppet."

Those shortcomings aside, Faircloughs "Better Day Coming" is an interesting narrative of the black struggle for equality in the twentieth century. His opinion may on occasions be questionable, but he does provide a full enough account in the text for the readers to ask meaningful questions of their own, and on that basis it is well worth reading. For anyone who is interested in the period of Reconstruction that immediately precedes the events described in this book, one could do no better than Eric Foners magnificent Reconstruction.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20