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J. A. Dean "judydean7"
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Braun MR500 Hand Blender
Braun MR500 Hand Blender
Offered by loriberto78
Price: 60.91

5.0 out of 5 stars Reliable and easy to use, 6 Jun 2014
I've had my Braun Hand Blender for years. It's mounted on the kitchen wall above the worktop with the bracket provided so is always within easy reach. It's great for sauces, soups and smoothies, milk shakes and also for soft cake mixes. The whisk attachment whisks egg whites really quickly and the chopper makes light work of grinding nuts, making breadcrumbs, etc. And it creates minimal washing up. Last year I decided to treat myself, for the first time ever, to an expensive food mixer (I bought a Magimix) but it is such a hassle I find I hardly ever use it and wish I'd never bothered. Mostly I just reach for my trusty Braun.


Lion Heart
Lion Heart
by Justin Cartwright
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 12.91

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A very unlikely hero, 9 Feb 2014
This review is from: Lion Heart (Hardcover)
I found this a totally implausible book. We are asked to believe that the charmless narrator, Richie has reached the age of 33 without ever having had a proper job, despite having achieved the finest First of his Oxford year. (So how has he survived for the past decade? The same question could be asked of his father, whose livelihood is never explained.) Nevertheless, everything now falls into Richie's lap. All the women who cross his path desire him (he is, after all, devilishly handsome) and every property owner he encounters offers him free accommodation. He gets invitations to luxury homes and London clubs. Travel is easy and money for flights, taxis, and trains is no problem. He is loaned a Porsche and bought an expensive suit by a long suffering friend, research grants come his way just for the asking, an ageing aristocrat gives him a job in the House of Lords, and wonderfully significant documents turn up everywhere he looks. Worse, an awkward, unresolvable relationship issue is settled by a simple plot device (that I won't reveal) that leaves the way clear to a happy ending.

If I had read this in a work by Ian Fleming it would have stretched my credulity. Are we supposed to take it seriously?


Our Spoons Came From Woolworths: A Virago Modern Classic (VMC Book 105)
Our Spoons Came From Woolworths: A Virago Modern Classic (VMC Book 105)
Price: 5.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a unique authorial voice, 13 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Barbara Comyns is a new writer to me but I intend to seek out more of her work. If anyone doubts the value of the Welfare State, the Abortion Act, and the Sexual Discrimination Act, they would do well to read this book and to discover what life in the 1930s could be like for a naive young woman who is introduced to its realities the hard way. Comyns writes in a very distinctive first person voice that I've not encountered elsewhere and the detached, unadorned tone only serves to underline her heroine's vulnerability and to make her story more affecting. Yes, she is foolish and few assertive modern women would be likely to make the same mistakes, but it's hard not to be caught up in her problems and to be happy for her when they're resolved. This is an original piece of fiction that deserves to be better known.


As Luck Would Have It
As Luck Would Have It
Price: 5.04

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Author in search of an editor, 4 Jan 2014
What has happened to our once great publishing houses? This autobiography by one of our finest and best loved actors is published by Harper Collins, a firm that I would have expected to produce better than this shoddy, cynical piece of work. The "Afterword and Acknowledgements" indicate that the book had been in preparation for seven years and that Garry O'Connor, its ghostwriter, had interviewed dozens of people during that period, presumably with the intention of producing a full biography. Did the publishers become impatient? Did someone at Harpers think it would be a great idea to cash in quickly on the success of Last Tango in Halifax? Who knows. But I strongly suspect the book is based entirely on an unedited transcription of tape recorded reminiscences by Jacobi, rushed into print without care or attention. No proof reading, no index, no fact checking, no second or third draft, no appendix listing his theatre, TV and film credits. Well, here's one member of the reading public who cares very much about omissions and errors, and who is becoming tired of books that reveal too clearly that some publishers are not doing their job properly.


The Unlikely Pilgrimage Of Harold Fry
The Unlikely Pilgrimage Of Harold Fry
by Rachel Joyce
Edition: Paperback
Price: 3.85

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars In defence of older readers, 9 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I agree with everyone here who has described the book as shallow, repetitive, underwritten and psychologically and logistically unconvincing. However, I'm very irritated by the suggestion made by several reviewers that it might be suitable for older readers or that a film version would appeal to the 'grey pound'. I can assure them that one's critical faculties are just as sharp at sixty plus and that we are equally capable of identifying cheap, cynical rubbish.


Dear Lupin...: Letters to a Wayward Son
Dear Lupin...: Letters to a Wayward Son
by Roger Mortimer
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 9.09

26 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The upper classes in denial, 10 Dec 2012
This is not quite the good natured, humorous collection of letters you might have expected from the carefully edited passages read on Radio 4 when it was chosen as their Book of the Week. Instead it's a veiled portrait of a dysfunctional and unhappy upper class family in denial about their problems. A depressed father, married to an accident-prone alcoholic wife, writes superficial letters full of trivia of no interest to the reader, to their drug addicted and alcoholic trustafarian son who, after dropping out of Eton, and then Army training, has spent a lifetime drifting in and out of a variety of doomed ventures. A measure of the father's concern and awareness is the question he asked his son when the latter, at the age of 32, finally booked into a rehabilitation centre. "It seems very pleasant here, old boy, but what exactly are you here for?"
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 11, 2013 3:16 PM BST


NIX 8 Inch Hu-Motion Digital Photo Frame - X08C. Motion Sensor turns frame ON/OFF automatically when it senses you nearby. Hi-Res 800 x 600 pixels
NIX 8 Inch Hu-Motion Digital Photo Frame - X08C. Motion Sensor turns frame ON/OFF automatically when it senses you nearby. Hi-Res 800 x 600 pixels

1.0 out of 5 stars Very disappointing, 8 Aug 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I couldn't get this to work as it should. The frame either kept getting stuck on the same image and wouldn't move on or, in random mode, kept showing the same few images over and over again rather than working its way through the whole file in random order. And the frame doesn't allow a simple dissolve from one image to another, but has a selection of very naff over-elaborate options. If you insert a memory stick, it protrudes to the side of the frame and looks ugly. Nor was I impressed by the picture quality - the images weren't crisp and the colours were washed out. So I'll stick to viewing my photos on my desktop with Iphoto. I sent the frame back and got a refund. Not recommended.


The Complete Buster Keaton Short Films [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1917]
The Complete Buster Keaton Short Films [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1917]
Dvd ~ Fatty Arbuckle
Offered by bestmediagroup
Price: 24.50

102 of 104 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous films, appalling audio commentaries, 1 Jun 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In 1917 a 21 year old Buster Keaton walked on to a film set for the very first time and without a single retake made his screen debut in a comedy sketch in Arbuckle's 'The Butcher Boy'. This collection includes 13 of the 14 films that Arbuckle and Keaton made together (one remains lost) and all of the 19 independent shorts Buster made after getting his own studio in 1920. It charts Buster's early development as one of the greatest performers and directors in the history of film comedy. The films are wonderful, and if you don't already know them, you are in for a treat.

The accompanying book has some nice photos, as well as extracts from Buster's autobiography and interview transcripts, but most of it is given over to a discussion between three film writers which I didn't find particularly illuminating.

My big problem is with the audio commentaries. They are by one Joseph McBride, described as a 'film historian' but who seems to fancy himself a psychoanalyst. My advice is don't listen to them, because they will kill the comedy for you. If you must, treat them with caution. McBride is OK while he sticks to explaining the technical and creative aspects of the films and providing a little historical and sociological context. But when he moves into the realm of psychology he is on very shaky ground. His comments about Buster's personal life are, at best, speculative and, at worst, inaccurate and insulting. Take no notice of them. There are plenty of Keaton experts around who would have made a better job of this, and I'm surprised at Eureka Video's choice.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 16, 2009 5:32 PM BST


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