Profile for Mickey > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Mickey
Top Reviewer Ranking: 53,032
Helpful Votes: 148

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Mickey

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Skellig: 15th Anniversary Edition
Skellig: 15th Anniversary Edition
by David Almond
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £10.10

5.0 out of 5 stars A modern classic, 14 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I give this as a Christmas present to the sons of friends I know every year, and it never fails to ignite a magical engagement and reaction. A contemporary classic. If you know a boy who claims that reading is dull, buy him this book.


A Foreign Country
A Foreign Country
by Charles Cumming
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

3.0 out of 5 stars Quite good, 14 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Foreign Country (Paperback)
A solid thriller but also a bit of a contrived plot. Not his best but okay Cumming is still better than a lot of the spy fare out there.


KP: The Autobiography
KP: The Autobiography
by Kevin Pietersen MBE
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £8.00

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Yawn, 14 Oct 2014
This review is from: KP: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
You can see why the publishers wanted as much hype as possible before anyone had had a chance to read the book. "Poor me, poor me, I'm so talented, I'm so maligned. Life is so unfair. Leave me alone and let me win matches for you losers."

I'm a huge cricket fan and have loved watching KP bat over the years, but the tedium of this self-serving autobiography is as relentless as his whinging. We all know the revelations - don't bother reading the rest.


That Close
That Close
by Suggs
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £7.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Suggs the wordsmith, 20 Nov 2013
This review is from: That Close (Hardcover)
I loved the fact that this wasn't your average ghost written cash-in autobiography. Reading THAT CLOSE is like spending several hours in Suggs' company, propping up a bar as he regales you with brilliantly told anecdotes about his colourful life. It's almost as fun to read as it must have been to live, and although I finished wanting more about Madness, I was delighted by the revelation of what a good writer Suggs is. Read this and then listen to The Liberty of Norton Folgate.


The Sacred History: How Angels, Mystics and Higher Intelligence Made Our World
The Sacred History: How Angels, Mystics and Higher Intelligence Made Our World
by Jonathan Black
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open your mind, 11 Sep 2013
I would call myself sceptical but open-minded when it comes to the other worldly and supernatural. The rational me dismisses such fancies but there's a part of me that wants a different, more magical, version of the world to exist. This book didn't turn me into an angelic believer, but it did make me reassess certain myths and stories, and Jonathan Black's wonderful retellings or interpretations of our shared global narratives really do offer an alternative view of human history. There's something magic within the pages of THE SACRED HISTORY which I found affecting and thought-provoking, so I recommend it whole-heartedly.


Richer Than God: Manchester City, Modern Football and Growing Up
Richer Than God: Manchester City, Modern Football and Growing Up
by David Conn
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A proper football book, 12 Jun 2012
I've always admired David Conn's writing in the Guardian, and didn't realise he was a lifelong Manchester City supporter. I don't follow Man. C but this is still a brilliant book, with Conn walking a fine balance between passionate fan and dispassionate journalist. The result is one of the best books I've read about a football club and what it means to be a football fan, at least since Fever Pitch (and I don't follow Arsenal either). If your Dad took you to football matches you should read this as a reminder of a lost world, and if you take your son to matches now it will make you think about how much the experience has changed in the last 30 years. This is a book which tugs at your heart strings whilst making you think how a sport has eaten away at itself to the detriment of its fans.


My Kind of Cooking
My Kind of Cooking
by Mark Sargeant
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.00

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant cookbook, 2 May 2012
This review is from: My Kind of Cooking (Hardcover)
I bought this on the back of seeing Mark on his new ITV saturday morning show, because I really like the way he cooks. I'm so glad I did as it's packed with fantastic recipes, and you get a real sense of Mark's cheeky passion for food and cooking in the descriptions. Roll on the weekend so I can try out a couple more.


The Fear Index
The Fear Index
by Robert Harris
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.99

13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Slight, 24 Oct 2011
This review is from: The Fear Index (Hardcover)
A huge disappointment from a writer of the calibre of Robert Harris. A ridiculous plot, peopled with cardboard caricatures, and a scattering of financial jargon in a failed attempt at 'insider' authenticity. The ending is so underwhelming and cliched that my only reaction was gratitude for the book not being longer, so I didn't waste more of my time reading it. If you admire Robert Harris, avoid this.


Peter Andre: A New Day at School
Peter Andre: A New Day at School
by Peter Andre
Edition: Paperback

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An instant classic, 7 Oct 2011
The title hints at the riches between the covers. Five words, each beautifully monosyllabic. Peter reminds us of the myriad possibilities of the English language, and how the simplest thoughts can be expressed in the simplest language.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 10, 2012 7:13 PM GMT


Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit
Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit
by Ian Leslie
Edition: Paperback

30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 7 Jun 2011
We all lie but rarely stop to think why we do it, or how often we're lied to back. BORN LIARS made me analyse my own behaviour, listen to my children more intently, watch politicians more closely, dissect adverts and basically look at the world in a refreshed way. Ian Leslie takes you on an effortlessly engaging tour of the world of deceit and self-deception and I loved this fascinating book.


Page: 1 | 2