Profile for Charles E. Glenn > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Charles E. Glenn
Top Reviewer Ranking: 683,888
Helpful Votes: 9

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Charles E. Glenn (Derby, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Disappeared
The Disappeared
Price: £3.66

4.0 out of 5 stars I would like to read more by this author, 17 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Disappeared (Kindle Edition)
The many twists and turns of the plot kept me hooked from beginning to end. I would like to read more by this author.


Guns
Guns
by Dudley Pope
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars This an old book first written in the 1960's but ..., 23 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Guns (Hardcover)
This an old book first written in the 1960's but what drew me to it are the large number of very clear cutaway drawings of weapons ranging from a wheel lock pistol to a machine gun turret in a World War Two bomber. The large format of the book means the reproductions of period drawings and illustrations are very clear despite the age of the publication.


The Man in the Moss (PHIL RICKMAN BACKLIST Book 5)
The Man in the Moss (PHIL RICKMAN BACKLIST Book 5)
Price: £2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Another great read from Phil Rickman, 23 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Another great read from Phil Rickman. More than a little far fetched, but suspend your dis-belief and enjoy! it gives "The Wicker Man" a good run for its money.


White Seed: The Untold Story of the Lost Colony of Roanoke
White Seed: The Untold Story of the Lost Colony of Roanoke
Price: £3.83

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I knew a little about the failed attempt by Walter ..., 23 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I knew a little about the failed attempt by Walter Raleigh to establish the first English colony in North America.

No one, to this day, knows what happened to the men, women and children who landed on Roanoke Island off the Carolina coast in the late 16th century. When John White eventually reached the colony three years later he found only the deserted remains of their fort and wooden houses. Of the colonists, there was not a trace.

The author weaves a very convincing story about what might have happened in those intervening 3 years. The story is based on very sound research into the social and political context in which the colony was founded. He also presents a very chilling picture of what a thin veneer civilisation is in reality and how things can quickly fall apart when a small group of mis-matched people are stranded far,far from home in the middle of hostile terrain.


Stephen Biesty's Castles
Stephen Biesty's Castles
by Meredith Hooper
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars will love this book, 23 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Anyone who is a fan of Stephen Biesty's cutaway drawings and likes his book, "Castle", will love this book. This book takes the reader through a range of castles through history and across the world.


Copenhagen Interiors
Copenhagen Interiors
by Peter; Fredericksen, Jens Olesen
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars I bought this as I already had the companion book ..., 23 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Copenhagen Interiors (Hardcover)
I bought this as I already had the companion book, "Copenghagen Open Spaces". Lovely photos of a wide variety of traditional and modern Scandinavian interiors.


Witch Hunt
Witch Hunt
Price: £2.09

4.0 out of 5 stars A ghost story focussing on an investigative journalist who unwittingly ..., 23 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Witch Hunt (Kindle Edition)
A ghost story focussing on an investigative journalist who unwittingly uncovers present day links to the real life witch hunts in 17th century Essex. Some truly chilling moments in this story.

Well written, and absorbing story which seems to be based on sound historical research.


The Hill of the Boar (The Seven Seals Book 1)
The Hill of the Boar (The Seven Seals Book 1)
Price: £0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dark Forces in Derbyshire, 31 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I think what most attracted me to this story is that a lot of the events take place in Ripley and Pentrich in Derbyshire, an area I know well but not usually known for its literary connections (DH Lawrence excepted, of course).

This is the first fictional work by this author and a brave venture into what is an already crowded genre; one dominated by well established authors such as James Rollins, David Gibbins and Dan Brown.

Like David Gibbins, Benjamin B. Lewis is an archaeologist in real life. His erudite knowledge in that field shines through in this book. The plot is multi layered jumping from the time of the Druids via Medieval England to modern day. The basic premise of the story is that there is a hidden portal under Pentrich church, a gateway between an evil dimension and our own. If opened, the portal would literally allow hell on earth. The portal has been closed for centuries guarded by a secret society. A murky, multinational company called Heltzer wants to re-open this portal for its own dark ends. A disparate group of ordinary seeming people are brought together to stop them.

Although this story can be enjoyed in its own right, it is intended to form part of a series of novels called The Severn Seals. As a result, the author introduces a cascade of characters and storylines in this first book. At times, this made for a labyrinthine plot which, for me, was fairly hard to follow. ( For others, that may well be part of this story’s appeal). However, enough of the seemingly disconnected storylines come together by the end to make for a satisfying conclusion whilst leaving enough open for the sequels.

The Hill of the Boar is clearly a plot driven story. I felt a lot of the characters were cliched, stock figures. This was particularly apparent in the policeman, Bill Clement, the all too typical, maverick cop with a drink problem and a messy divorce behind him. His scruffy appearance was very reminiscent of the tv detective, Colombo, and in fact one of the other characters refers to him as such. There is a hint of a romance beween the cop and the lady doctor, Caitlin. How many times has that been seen before?
The language is at times a bit clunky. There has been a lack of editing with some words missing or mis-spelt. The frequent use of the word “gotten” seemed at odds with a book written by a modern Englishman.

On those occasions when descriptions of real places, now or in the past, were required, I sensed the real life archaeologist taking over from the fiction writer. At times, he seemed to be striving too hard for archaeological or historical accuracy. In the description of Pentrich Church, for example, architectural terms are used which are unlikely to mean much to the non-specialist. The description of Ripley read as if had been lifted straight from its entry in Wikipedia.

Putting these gripes beside. I think any fan of this kind of fiction will enjoy reading this book. I look forward to the sequels.


An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Uniforms of the Roman World
An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Uniforms of the Roman World
by Kevin F. Kiley
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.58

6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Inspiring Overview of a Vast Subject, 24 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very attractively produced book. It is excellent value for its price having over 600 specially drawn, colour illustrations as well as many "period" illustrations packed into 256 pages.

The book covers the whole of the Roman period, including the Eastern Roman empire until 1453. (Although uniform illustrations stop short of this end date at around the end of the 13th century).

Subjects include the the Roman army and navy and the enemies of Rome. I like the sections on the Roman Navy and artillery and there are some nice reconstructions of the Theodosian Walls of Constantinople.

The worst feature, in my opinion, is the lack of references and a bibliography. This is a pity because much of the information, and many of the illustrations, are derivative, owing much to Osprey series of military uniform books and other works by Peter Connolly, H Russell Robinson, Mike Bishop, Graham Sumner and Raffaele D'Amato.

Those who already have the books by those authors will probably be disappointed to find there is nothing new here. The illustrations are, in many cases, almost direct re-drawings of pictures by Angus McBride, Peter Connolly and Graham Sumner.

Nevertheless, many of the "copies" do full justice to the originals on which they are based. They are also drawn together in a single book, the price of which is less than the full cost of just two Osprey titles.

One of the strengths of this series of military uniform books is that the historic context for each period is more detailed, better written and much more readable than that found in some of the more "technical" studies of arms and uniforms. That is certainly evident here. One can follow the entire history of Rome from its founding to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. According to the synopsis on the jacket, the author, Kevin F. Kiley, has a special interest in the Eastern Roman Empire. It is heartening that a substantial part of this book is dedicated to that oft forgotten part of the Roman world.

The author and publishers seem to have taken on board criticism levelled at previous books in this series where the quality and style of illustration was much more varied. Here, the quality is of a consistently good to excellent standard and there is a far better blend of styles between the three artists used, Ton Croft, Simon Smith, and Mathew Vince.

My only real criticism of the illustrations is that a small number of the computer generated images show some very poor rendering of mail and some of the armour and equipment appears awkward and badly fitting.

One amusing point. Some of the figures appear to have been closely based on modern actors. I recognised Ewan McGregor as a Gallic warrior on page 117 and the Lakhmid horse archer on page 171 looks suspiciously like Christopher Lee!

If I was looking for a reasonably priced book which offers an inspiring and comprehensive overview of the subject, this is the book I would choose. It would certainly make a very good addition to a school or college library.

Charles Glenn, 24/12/2012


Roman Military Clothing: v. 3: AD 400-640 (Men-at-Arms)
Roman Military Clothing: v. 3: AD 400-640 (Men-at-Arms)
by Graham Sumner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Roman Military Clothing AD 400-640, 23 Mar. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was inspired to buy this book after reading William Napier's trilogy of novels on Atilla the Hun. I wanted to know what the Romans who fought against Atilla in the 5th Century might have looked like.

The wealth of evidence for what soldiers wore from the period-mosaics, frescoes and even surviving clothing-is brough to life in Graham Sumner's vibrant illustrations.

I would thoroughly recommend this book and its companion volumes to anyone with an interest in this tumultunous period of history.


Page: 1