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Andrew Brady (Essex)
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Erbstein: The triumph and tragedy of football's forgotten pioneer
Erbstein: The triumph and tragedy of football's forgotten pioneer
Price: £2.25

4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating look at another world, 11 Jan. 2015
Very interesting, and thoroughly researched. Amazing story of how his family escaped the holocaust, and extremely moving when dealing with the Superga tragedy and its aftermath. The last 4 matches of Torino's season were completed by their youth team, and all their opponents agreed to field their own youth teams in turn. Football sometimes gets it right, perhaps more then than it does today.


Case Histories: (Jackson Brodie)
Case Histories: (Jackson Brodie)
by Kate Atkinson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too good for crime genre, too exciting for literary novel, 30 Aug. 2010
That's it really. If you can read the first three chapters without wanting more, then put it down - I was hooked and horrified, then I enjoyed the unravelling as it all unravelled...


History Lessons: What Business and Management can Learn from the Great Leaders of History
History Lessons: What Business and Management can Learn from the Great Leaders of History
by Jonathan Gifford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs to connect more, 26 April 2010
Result! A book about business which uses history to make its case for modern leadership techniques (apparently of interest to pretty much everyone, whether "the president of a multinational corporation or the organizer of a local charity event.")

Unfortunately the book is a bit of a let-down. After a bright beginning which sets out eight aspects of leadership (like "changing the mood", "bringing people with you" and "creating opportunities"), things go downhill faster than King Harold's army chasing the Normans at the Battle of Hastings. The succeeding chapters simply list three great leaders for each leadership trait, and tells each one's story, or part of it, to show how they were good at planning (Napoleon), leading from the front (Nelson), making it happen (Oliver Cromwell), or whatever. In fact it feels suspiciously like some history essays with some business bits stuck in to join them together and make a theme.

It's not a bad book at all in terms of readability - there are some interesting subjects like Lee Kuan Yew, the founder of modern Singapore - but I just wish Gifford had made a bit more effort to bring the worlds of business and history together. And even for me, indoctrinated as a youth by the Ladybird world view that history is about chaps, preferably British chaps too, the choice of just TWO women out of 24 subjects seems a bit old hat. Queen Elizabeth I and Elizabeth Garrett Anderson could surely have been joined by Florence Nightingale, Joan of Arc, Boudicca, Eva Peron, Rosa Parks or Catherine the Great?

In short, leaders looking for inspirational stories might well find them, but the struggle of linking Genghis Khan's creation of the largest contiguous land empire in history with your attempt to open a branch in Romford might prove a bit much unless you're in the mood.


Management for Social Enterprise
Management for Social Enterprise
by Bob Doherty
Edition: Paperback
Price: £28.79

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Meets a gap in the market, 18 Feb. 2010
The concept of management as something to study has taken a bit of a bashing lately, what with all those MBAs ruining the global economy and everything, but there are many, both inside and outside academia, who still attempt to accumulate and distil collective experience for the benefit of those attempting to manage at whatever level.

This interesting book is a useful starting point for those with an interest in managing social enterprises, whether from an academic or practitioner perspective. The authors, based at Liverpool Business School and with considerable experience working with social enterprises, cover a range of useful topics including strategic management, managing people, marketing, governance and financial management. While there are plenty of works on these subjects already, the social enterprise focus throughout is unique, and, despite the academic background, the book scores fairly highly on the readability scale.

The financial management chapter might be particularly useful for the sector: in my experience, managers are perfectly willing to express their need for finance training, and extremely unwilling to attend any courses on the subject when push comes to shove. Aimed firmly at non-financial managers, the section gives a welcome priority to costing and pricing, as well as running through some accounting terminology, strictly on a `need to know' basis.

While there are some areas the book deals with only briefly (those interested in working with the public sector, social accounting, or the role of networks will be largely disappointed), it remains an excellent overview of most of the main issues. Unfortunately the price (£24.99, or about £20 on Amazon which is relatively cheap for a textbook but still pretty dear for 250 pages or so) makes it less of a must-buy, but if you have a birthday coming up you know what to ask for...


The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing (Oxford Landmark Science)
The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing (Oxford Landmark Science)
by Richard Dawkins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.64

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not even finished yet, 14 Feb. 2010
...and it's already been jawdroppingly interesting enough to rate 5 stars. I am a non-scientist and what has amazed me so far is the literate, almost poetic style of some of the writing, quite beautiful and tailor-made for the subject matter's scope and importance.


The Social Entrepreneur Revolution: Doing good by making money, making money by doing good
The Social Entrepreneur Revolution: Doing good by making money, making money by doing good
by Martin Clark
Edition: Paperback

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well written and wide ranging read, 28 July 2009
Social enterprise has come a long way since the UK government `discovered' it in 2002 with the DTI's Strategy for Success booklet. One index of the increasing interest in the subject is the relative flood of books on the subject in recent times. There was a time when an educated fellow such as myself could claim to know all there was to know about social enterprise because he had read two books: Social Enterprise in Anytown by John Pearce and There's No Business Like Social Business. Now it seems that barely a week goes past without another must-read tome on the topic appearing on the shelves. Broadly there are three kinds of `proper' book on social enterprise (if you ignore the academic texts, which let's face it, most people do). There's the `inspiring story of a whole load of world-changing leaders' category, exemplified by what the publishers modestly describe as `the bible for social entrepreneurship', David Bornstein's How to Change the World. Type two is when the inspiring story is actually written by the social enterprise leader in question, Muhammad Yunus's latest book Creating a World Without Poverty being one extremely readable example. Finally there are the step-by-step guides, of which my personal favourite is our own Craig Dearden-Philips's Your Chance to Change the World: The No-fibbing Guide to Social Entrepreneurship, a well-researched and engaging read for any aspiring social enterprise founder.

Martin Clark is another Cambridge based social entrepreneur who has somehow managed to write a book in between his work and family commitments, and the result stubbornly refuses to fit into any of my pigeon holes. Like a well known mobile phone, The Social Entrepreneur Revolution impresses most of all in the number of its applications. Casual readers wanting to gain an outline understanding, academics, wannabe social entrepreneurs and those looking for inspiration will all find something of interest in its pages. Clark has succeeded in talking to the top end SE-lebrities such as Jeff Skoll (top tip for planning your life: imagine what you want written on your tombstone and then work backwards), but also makes room for a Southport pastor and the founder of the WTO (that's World Toilet Organisation, by the way). However, there are also sections allowing the reader to assess his or her own level of entrepreneurship and a quick `set up a social enterprise on a beermat' how-to guide. Finally, those looking for the bigger picture can enjoy Clark's typologies of the social entrepreneur and his concluding chapters on social enterprise's potential to transform the world, chapters in which his refusal to be deflected by negativity or cynicism are most evident.

There are a couple of things I would change - one is the relative lack of attention paid to Clark's own enterprise journey, the other the ghastly cover which combines Soviet Art (good) with New Labour costumes (bad) - but overall this is a book that can be highly recommended.


Playmobil - Soccer Match 4700
Playmobil - Soccer Match 4700
Offered by verkauf1
Price: £86.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Waste of money, 28 July 2009
Our family are playmobil addicts, generally prepared to stump up the expensive prices in return for hours of pleasure. This really is a pathetic excuse for a football game - poorly thought out, hardly any figures, and very expensive. Steer clear


Your Chance to Change the World: The No-fibbing Guide to Social Entrepreneurship
Your Chance to Change the World: The No-fibbing Guide to Social Entrepreneurship
by Craig Dearden-Phillips
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.95

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely accessible introduction, 28 July 2009
Craig is one of the top social enterprise leaders in the East of England region, and this book is a warts and all description of his own story, complemented by the views of other entrepreneurs. It's of interest to educators (like me) and their students, but is also a very practical guide to those wishing to set up a business primarily for social impact rather than financial gain.


1966 and All That
1966 and All That
by Craig Brown
Edition: Hardcover

10 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Based on the extract in the Guardian..., 10 Nov. 2005
This review is from: 1966 and All That (Hardcover)
This is the least funny book of this or the last century. Here is a quote regarding 80s music:
"...dominated by groups such as Droan Droan, Spandau Ballsup, Adam Aunt and Depressive Mode. They all danced with great difficulty and thus became known as the New Rheumatics."
Completely unmoved smiley face, tumbleweed etc
Hasn't this person got friends who can tell him what drivel he's writing?


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