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Mike Church (Spain)

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Shakespeare's Cuthbert (Cuthbert Series Book 1)
Shakespeare's Cuthbert (Cuthbert Series Book 1)
Price: £2.11

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful, 25 Aug. 2014
As a previous reviewer has observed, Patrick Barrett writes like Tom Sharpe “without the bad language”. Personally, I’d be happy to write like Tom Sharpe using any kind of language, and I fully endorse that reviewer’s opinion. This is a refreshingly clean farce, combining all those essential ingredients: a plot told at breakneck speed, a myriad of highly improbable situations, a motley cast of engaging characters, and a huge sigh of relief when the curtain comes down.

Thoroughly recommended. This is the most pleasurable read I’ve had in ages. And just look at all those 4- and 5-star reviews!


The Division of the Damned
The Division of the Damned
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Seemed perfectly plausible to me..., 12 July 2014
I’m not remotely interested in vampires, I don’t much care for werewolves and, if truth be told, I’d rather not read about the atrocities of the Second World War. What possessed me, therefore, to buy this magnificent tale remains a mystery; and it is, of course, all the more to the author’s credit that I found myself thoroughly absorbed by this page-clicking adventure.

The depth of research and historical accuracy on offer here is such that we find ourselves happily suspending disbelief – vampires fighting alongside SS soldiers for heaven’s sake! – while wondering, Perhaps the history books haven’t quite told us the whole story?

Until you reach the last page, that is, when you fall back to earth with a bump, and remind yourself that daydreaming is all well and good, but it’s not going to put your dinner on the table.


Danger Danger: Twin girls, separated at birth, but who run into similar kinds of danger
Danger Danger: Twin girls, separated at birth, but who run into similar kinds of danger
Price: £1.66

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not another 5-star review?!, 15 July 2012
This is an excellent read, and a thoughtful insight into the lives of three friends (Belfast girls) who lead very separate yet ultimately interwoven lives. The descriptions seem realistic to me, and I particularly enjoyed the pacing of the novel: never dragging yet never galloping out of control, either. I also liked the author's refusal to paint a black and white picture of "the Troubles", and the message that there can never be winners in conflicts of this magnitude. Definitely recommended.


The Blue Food Revolution
The Blue Food Revolution
by Tim Roux
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.42

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Amazing Maze, 1 May 2012
This is a "fantastic" read in every sense of the word. Or two reads, rather; hence the "Revolution" pun in the title, I suppose. HIS story ("Blue Food", blue cover, of course) and HER story ("Revolution", red cover, what else?) interweave against the backdrop of twentieth-century HISTORY, leaving the reader to choose the path they wish to follow: read a chapter (or two), flip the book (or don't), see what she or he is up to (or not), flip back ... Will they ever meet? ... Hang on a minute, they did meet! ... Oh, look, he's off again ...

All roads lead to Rome, they say, and sooner or later you'll END up somewhere in the MIDDLE. This is just as things should be for, whether consciously or not - though almost certainly the former -, the writer appears to be saying (to me at least) that there is no such thing as total freedom; that eventually, for better or worse, we will all have our wings clipped one day. This is cleverly mirrored in the very different paths that HE and SHE take: John has his freedom virtually thrust upon him while Marion is literally itching to get away. In addition, John would seem to be travelling in some kind of invisible tardis-cum-wardrobe, while Marion seems content to rely on good old-fashioned public transport to get from A to B. John's story appears to consist of entirely unrelated episodes, whereas there is a certain continuity to the threads in Marion's adventures. Mars and Venus experts could have a field day here.

Whilst overtly a fun read/romp, BFR is a deceptively deep work at the same time, and I'm aware that many of the historical references went over my head. Indeed, at times I felt a little lost without my Brodie's Notes and/or 20th Century History for Dummies to hand. Better read readers than I will surely enjoy spotting the cultural references along the way.

Well, I could go on and on, but I think I'll bring this review to a close with one of my favourite quotes from the book:

"Being a wanderer I carry the souls of my loved-ones with me and when they die most of their soul disappears with them, leaving me with a wisp of their memory which is nothing like enough to comfort me."

Although also available on Kindle, this book is almost certainly a more enjoyable experience in its original paperback form. It might also be a good idea to order an extra bookmark at the same time.


Edge of Extinction
Edge of Extinction

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Edge of Extinction, 30 April 2012
This is a well-written novel which tackles very relevant issues at the same time: What price progress? Is there no end to man's greed and stupidity? etc. The story itself is both a fast-moving read and a page-turner (or arrow-clicker if you have a Kindle).

I very much look forward to Kristen Stone's next work.


The Angel At The Bar
The Angel At The Bar
Price: £2.39

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love above and pub grub?, 12 Feb. 2012
A manual on brand management? A love story? A long pub crawl? Well, it's all of these things, and so much more. Any book with Tim Roux's name to it is a guaranteed good read as far as I'm concerned. He is particularly good, I feel, on emotional and ethical issues; he's also a dab hand at portraying human tragedy and joy in equal measure. I'm deliberately being vague here as I don't want to give too much away. You'll just have to read the book, I'm afraid.


Harry Walker's Wife
Harry Walker's Wife
Price: £2.39

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too good to be T.Roux?, 8 Feb. 2012
The reviewers below have summarised the plot far better than I can, so I'll just say that I enjoyed every page of this wonderful novel. Tim Roux has an uncanny ability to present original and complex themes in an eminently readable way. Very few writers can pull that off without sounding too high-brow or pretentious.

Many people say that every story that can be told has already been told. Read Tim Roux's works, and you'll soon realise that's not true at all. And what a bargain buy for Kindle lovers, by the way.


Duende
Duende

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So much more than your average love story, 23 Dec. 2011
This review is from: Duende (Kindle Edition)
Duende is an incredibly ambitious novel for a debut. What could have been a "simple" love story is so much more than that, rewarding the reader with a rollercoaster of a ride through the turbulent 30s of Spain's history, together with an overview of the prevalent artistic and philosophical movements of the day. This is a delightful, stimulating and informative read on every level. Oh, and what an ending.


Belfast Girls
Belfast Girls

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not another 5-star review?!, 4 Dec. 2011
This review is from: Belfast Girls (Kindle Edition)
This is an excellent read, and a thoughtful insight into the lives of three friends (Belfast girls) who lead very separate yet ultimately interwoven lives. The descriptions seem realistic to me, and I particularly enjoyed the pacing of the novel: never dragging yet never galloping out of control, either. I also liked the author's refusal to paint a black and white picture of "the Troubles", and the message that there can never be winners in conflicts of this magnitude. Definitely recommended.


Sliding on the Snow Stone
Sliding on the Snow Stone

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sliding... and Moving, 30 Sept. 2011
This is a wonderfully written story, and a fascinating insight into life in a lesser known corner of the world during the second world war. A beautiful read, and sure to make you shed a tear or two as you turn the pages.


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