ARRAY(0xa335c834)
 
Profile for Adverse Camber > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Adverse Camber
Top Reviewer Ranking: 116,108
Helpful Votes: 13

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Adverse Camber

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Fire and Light
Fire and Light
Price: 1.97

3.0 out of 5 stars Good read BAD Kindle errors, 14 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fire and Light (Kindle Edition)
Interesting read, but so full of typos it was hard not to be annoyed at times.
Characters were interesting and had some cool concepts, but the writing itself didn't excite me.


AudioQuest 90 Degree RCA Adaptor
AudioQuest 90 Degree RCA Adaptor
Offered by iGADGET
Price: 8.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Solid, firm connection, 14 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Great connector that hasn't affected the sound of my subwoofer at all, but now it can sit much closer to the wall and not crush the cable. I'm happy!


Contagious: How to Build Word of Mouth in the Digital Age
Contagious: How to Build Word of Mouth in the Digital Age
Price: 3.99

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some great insights hobbled by terrible execution., 14 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I love the concept of creating content that is easy to talk about and Berger breaks it down into 6 factors that contribute to creating really sharable content. These ideas are really well explained and make intuitive sense, so after the intro I couldn't wait to get into the meat of what makes these points tick and how they can be used.

Berger is passionate about having testable scientific rigour to underlie his points. This was another great hook for me - things should be proven, repeatable and solid. Sadly this is where the book falls flat - because his examples are often naive or just poor science that fails to deliver on his premise.

For example, he mentions an experiment to support the idea that people like to talk about themselves (I think we can all agree that people love to talk without the need for an experiment to prove it, but hey ho). The unforgivable sin is that he chooses an experiment that doesn't show that. The test asks people to take a paid survey and at some point they are given a few minutes of boring downtime. They can choose to wait it out, or they can choose to take less money for the survey but be allowed to talk about themselves during that downtime instead. The paper's authors claim that because their participants will sacrifice money to talk, it means that we find talking about ourselves so beguiling that we'll give up money to do it. All it really proves is that people will pay to avoid boredom. To back that up, many free to play videogames base their entire income on forcing people to wait or pay money to skip the wait. People find that BOREDOM abhorrent enough that they will pay to avoid it - making the game company millions of dollars. So this experiment doesn't back up his point, instead it makes you think he's trying to obsfucate the truth using SCIENCE. The book and his points are worse off for it.

A few pages later Berger says things should be gamified with badges because people like to have a symbol that proves they have accomplished something - and then they share it. That's fine if it's a national medal or a Nobel prize, but digital badges passed beyond saturation point years ago. My friends' Facebook walls are clogged with foursquare and candy crush badges (and whatever else the latest games are posting on their behalf). Rather than wanting to share badges and pass them on, we're becoming hyper-aware of not spamming our friends with crap - because we know how irritating they are when they clog up our social feeds. This in itself falls foul of one of his own points - people share things that other people will think is cool to give them social capital. This point is awesome and really rings true, but it directly contradicts people's real behaviour when it comes to badges.

The book is chock so full of these contradictions and shlock science that all the good stuff gets lost.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 6, 2013 9:57 PM BST


Tech21 D3O Impact Snap Case for Samsung Galaxy S4 - Black
Tech21 D3O Impact Snap Case for Samsung Galaxy S4 - Black
Offered by B2B TRADING
Price: 7.20

4.0 out of 5 stars Sturdy, solid, premium., 8 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Great case. Very strong and solid - the idea of the impact resistance of the D30 compound is amazing.
It doesn't seem to get any fingerprints on the case, so it looks great and stays looking great.

Two slight grudges,
1: The s4 has nice square sides which makes it sit well in the hand, much better than the s3.
BUT the case has rounded sides so it feels like it will slip out of the hand - just like the s3 :(

2: The material feels good in the hand, but its slightly slick and a marginally rougher surface would help it to feel better. It doesn't feel as premium as the crappy plastic back-cover that comes with the s4!


White Porcelain Coffee Filter Cone
White Porcelain Coffee Filter Cone
Offered by Colanders
Price: 6.55

4.0 out of 5 stars Delicious, 30 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Makes extra tasty coffee.
One issue is that it can ride around the rim of the cup, depending on the cup you're using.
Once you've found the right one and paired it with a decent filter paper, this beauty makes really fine coffee - balanced and without the bitter steeped-too-long taste you get from a cafetiere or a percolator.
Really deep and tasty stuff.


Kitchen Craft Aluminium Large Sink Strainer
Kitchen Craft Aluminium Large Sink Strainer
Offered by GSA*Retail
Price: 2.08

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Large not deep, 30 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Slides happily around the sink.
The inset is not really deep enough to keep it in place.
A few knocks with a sufficiently hammer helped, but it still doesn't really stay still, which means it doesn't strain the sink, which means it doesn't do what it should. It's a sink strainer after-all.
I've talked myself into re-adjusting the score from two stars to one.
Yep, pretty poor stuff.


No Title Available

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars POWER, MOAR POWER, 30 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The battery charges with no problems and lasts for a decent amount of time, even when gaming.
A great replacement battery.


Final Empire: Mistborn: Book One
Final Empire: Mistborn: Book One
Price: 1.49

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Glib, but interesting, 25 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've now read all 3+1 books in Mistborn.
It's a little hard to believe in some of the characters as great, powerful characters. They are treated so glibly, their conversations so facile, their plotting so threadbare.
Yet the book is oddly compelling and grows better and better throughout the first 3 books.
So many aspects of it seem like they need to be rounded out much better - the magic system for example - but over the course of the books it evolves, grows powerful and satisfying.
Well worth a read, there is depth behind the simplicity and it's worth discovering.


Going Nowhere: A Life in Six Videogames (Kindle Single)
Going Nowhere: A Life in Six Videogames (Kindle Single)
Price: 1.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short but beautiful, 25 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Very short, but eloquently told tale of adolescence and the way a boy sees the world. Games are the medium he uses to show how kids change, what's important to them, how they behave, learn and grow. Striking in its simplicity, piercing in its plain truthfulness. A joy, albeit a compact one.


The Fractal Prince (Jean le Flambeur)
The Fractal Prince (Jean le Flambeur)
Price: 3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inventive, Mind Blowing well crafted Future Epic, 10 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
An absolute tour de force of inventiveness.
Fascinating worlds, beautifully rich technology and great characterisation makes the Fractal Prince into a must read.
You'll need a little patience at first, but stick with the somewhat disorienting lore and language and you'll be richly rewarded. As the texture and subtlety of this well-realised reality gradually reveals itself you'll be gripped, swept up in the journey and completely immersed in the almost magical technology.
In fact, because it is so seamlessly stitched into the lives of the people we're following, you soon understand why Rajaniemi doesn't just explain it - that would break the reality of the world he's created.
Get hold of this and dive in.


Page: 1 | 2