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D. Newrick "David Newrick"
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Four Seasons (London Mozart Players, Juritz) [DVD AUDIO]
Four Seasons (London Mozart Players, Juritz) [DVD AUDIO]

5.0 out of 5 stars Vivaldi Vivaldi Vivaldi!, 14 Mar. 2008
Without doubt you will know the music on this disc. The Four Seasons have been used in every area of film, television, advertisements, even hotel foyers. The popularity of this music has remained high for decades.

When music is so popular you have to tell yourself that it is well worth having a higher-definition sound - even if you do have previous stereo recordings. I have the Kennedy version and never listen to it - many of you will know why. This interpretation is much closer to the original (using modern instruments) and stands repeated listening. Also the on-screen visuals are quite delightful (although I frequently only listen to the music). As if that wasn't enough you also get a further two concertos - the D Major RV 582 and the C Major RV 581, both for violin and double orchestra.

If the price remains so low then buy it! It is well worth being totally selfish and indulging yourself with a modern copy of this truly great work.


Beethoven: Complete Symphonies
Beethoven: Complete Symphonies
Price: £12.44

73 of 80 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding recording and interpretation, 14 Mar. 2008
This is an absolute bargain for the quality and scope of what you are getting.

Sonically the multi-channel recordings are consistently outstanding - allowing the music to breathe new air. The interpretation by Bernard Haitink and the London Symphony Orchestra is a revelation, at times driven and forward moving, at other times laconic and reflective - revealing layers in the music that are not apparent in the more 'famous' recordings to date. Once you have heard this set you will understand much more clearly why Beethoven was seen by his contemporaries to be smashing apart the symphonic form in length, scope, theme and complexity.

Wherever you look on this set there are musical rewards to be found. As if that wasn't enough you also have the Leonore Overture (No. 2) and the Triple Concerto.

I could go on, but you don't have all week to read reviews. Simply a 'must have' for any modern classical music lover (in my humble opinion).


Chants D'auvergne (Casadesus, Orch. National De Lille, Gens) [DVD AUDIO]
Chants D'auvergne (Casadesus, Orch. National De Lille, Gens) [DVD AUDIO]
Offered by MEGA Media FBA
Price: £9.00

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Authentically French & beautiful, 28 May 2006
These songs have grown in polularity for many years now and have been recorded by some major figures. Many compilations never fail to include Bolero as a beautiful piece of music.

Yet this collection contains many more beautiful songs, excellently performed by the soprano Veronique Gens here. There is always a slight nasal quality to the French accent which makes it quite distinct and which is always missing from more 'operatic' singers. Gens, actually coming from the Auvergne itself, does not attempt to remove this from her voice and so makes it a truly authentic French collection of delightful songs.

The Orchestra National de Lille under Casadesus play with sweetness or with joy and vigour - depending on what is required by the composer for these peasant songs. On-screen you are treated to delightful scenes of the Auvergne (I assume, or country scenes at least) which really do enhance the beauty of the whole experience.

I have to admit I was really suprised at how good this entire package is because of its low price. Quite frankly Naxos should be doubling the price for such authenticity and quality - until they do that then this is an absolute bargain which you will want to listen to over and over again.


Mahler: Symphony No. 2 "Resurrection" [DVD AUDIO]
Mahler: Symphony No. 2 "Resurrection" [DVD AUDIO]
Offered by music_by_mail_uk
Price: £22.95

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb in every aspect, 15 May 2006
If there are any works that cry out to be recorded in the new high quality multi-channel formats this is one of the leading contenders. Gustav Mahler actually wrote this work to use the space of the auditorium, placing the horns for example off the stage area, to give a sense of wonder and awe at immense powers at work.

Zubin Mehta with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra excel throughout. The soloists and choir performance excellently at every level; at times hushed with reverence, then exhultant as they sing to the heavens. The recording engineers have found a perfect balance in the recording placing the soloists, Nancy Gustafson and Florence Quivar, so that they soar above the chorus sublimely which is especially noticable in the Etwas bewegter movement. Yet when the organ thunders towards the end of the work the room almost shakes at the tremendous power of its sound.

Yet the dvd-audio disk does not stop there. The artwork and inormation provided both in the booklet and on-screen are impressive also.

There are many great recordings of this powerful and moving symphony. From Bruno Walter to Bernstein to Barenboim many conductors and orchestras have sought to provide us with their interpretation of this profound work. Zubin Mehta, in my opinion, has placed himself up there amongst the great recordings. He has been assisted at every level by quality from everyone else, including Teldec, making this an unreserved recommendation for your DVD Audio library.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 25, 2010 12:13 PM GMT


Best Classics 100 [DVD AUDIO]
Best Classics 100 [DVD AUDIO]
Offered by inandout-distribution
Price: £20.69

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A missed opportunity, 8 May 2006
If, like me and many others, you are beginning to explore the new music formats of SACD and DVD-Audio you will find that this release is a missed opportunity.

Believing that this was a release of recordings by EMI that had been recorded in the new high definition formats I was very disappointed to find that it is nothing more than the lower definition two channel stereo, rather than 5 or 5.1 sound. Further, almost track for track they are almost exactly the same recordings that are available at almost half the price in the 'Your hundred best tunes' box set also by EMI.

What then are you paying your money for? It would seem that EMI believe you are willing to pay extra for the benefit of having 2 discs to swop rather than 6 and to have a repetitive image of swirling notes moving on your screen - there are no track details or information shown on the screen other than the track title itself. Sadly, the two discs are simply stuffed into a single DVD box.

Comparing this release to the excellently recorded Chants d'Auvergne DVD-Audio recording on the low price Naxos label seems almost farcical. The difference in the sound from the higher definition 5.1 recording and the on-screen images and displayed information between the two is enormous. Naxos clearly have the lead in this field and have taken the initiative in a still fairly unproven market. If you are trying out these formats the Naxos recording just mentioned or the Teldec Mahler's Resurrection Symphony recording, conducted by Zubin Mehta, would be much more rewarding for sound quality and performance.

So where does this leave EMI classical then? Well, they have missed an opportunity to release a showcase DVD-Audio. Instead of creating enthusiasm amongst buyers there is a danger that if they buy these 2 disc they will be deeply disappointed at what they hear. It is NOT a DVD-Audio recording, it is a stereo recording on DVD discs - as long as you aware of that you will be better placed to make an informed decision - but if you really want to try out the higher definition sound DVD-Audio provides then look elsewhere and save your money.


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