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2 Parts Hard Leather Case with trpod threaded hole for PANASONIC LUMIX LX3,LEICA D-LUX Digital Camera as DMW-CLX3 or Leica 18669 Classic (Black)
2 Parts Hard Leather Case with trpod threaded hole for PANASONIC LUMIX LX3,LEICA D-LUX Digital Camera as DMW-CLX3 or Leica 18669 Classic (Black)

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Do not buy for LX5!, 18 Nov. 2010
When I purchased this item, it was advertised as suitable for a Panasonic LX5. However, it was completely the wrong size for this camera. The case is meant to attach to the camera through a screw fitting into the tripod connector, but the screw was in the wrong position so the case didn't fit. I had to return it.

Presuming that it actually fits your camera, though, it's a good enough case. It was pretty sturdy and seemed well-made. I wouldn't have had any problems with it if it had been the size it was advertised to be.


QI: The Book of General Ignorance (The Noticeably Stouter Edition)
QI: The Book of General Ignorance (The Noticeably Stouter Edition)
by Stephen Fry
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

47 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and alarmingly addictive, 27 Aug. 2009
The Noticeably Stouter Book of General Ignorance is fun to read and packed full of interesting facts. It's perfect for dipping into every now and again - most of the articles are only one or two pages long, and manage to cram in a surprising amount of information. They often veer off on unexpected tangents - one beginning with a discussion of the phrase `survival of the fittest' concludes with a rush of interesting facts about paperclips (in Nazi-occupied Norway they were used as symbols of the resistance, and only five out of every 100,000 sold are actually used to hold papers together). It's almost impossible to read a page without wanting to run to the nearest person, clutching the book and gibbering, "Did you know...? Did you know...?" (though this has the unfortunate side-effect of making you sound like an irritating know-it-all for the duration.)
This is more of a second edition to the original Book of General Ignorance than an entirely new book, so if you already own the latter it may not be a worthwhile purchase. If you don't, however, Noticeably Stouter has dozens of new articles, amusing quotes from the TV series interspersed throughout, and (for diehard fans), a list of all the QI guests so far. Another definite improvement is the inclusion of an index (subjects range from `aardvarks, colour-blindness of' to `zenzizenzizenzic, as failed neologism'). As well as aiding serendipitous browsing, this can be extremely useful when you confidently announce to a roomful of people that strawberries and raspberries are not, in fact, berries, then promptly forget why; or when you urgently need to calculate your pet's real age in dog years.
I've had to wrestle my copy away from visitors, who pick it up, start idly thumbing through it, and refuse to put it down for the rest of the evening. I've spent a number of rainy Sunday afternoons curled up with it on the sofa. I've spouted facts from it to dozens of long-suffering friends and relations. And I'm not quite sure if I feel more or less ignorant than I was when I started. Definitely a trivia book in a class of its own.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 19, 2015 11:35 PM BST


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