Profile for T. Leunig > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by T. Leunig
Top Reviewer Ranking: 41,512
Helpful Votes: 143

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
T. Leunig "Dr Tim Leunig" (London, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3
pixel
Power Trip: A Decade of Policy, Plots and Spin
Power Trip: A Decade of Policy, Plots and Spin

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the dullest books I have ever read, 14 Jan 2014
This book fails at all levels. It is not sufficiently wide reaching or thoughtful to interest those who are interested in the Labour years as a whole, and it is not sufficiently juicy for those who like gossipy accounts. It is long and dull. And he certainly doesn't seem very apologetic for the things that he did. I was lent a copy by a friend, but even so, I regret the time I spent reading it.


How to be a Minister
How to be a Minister
by Gerald Kaufman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars As good as a Minister told me it was, 14 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How to be a Minister (Paperback)
I work in Ministerial office, and a Minister told me that this was a great book, and that those who work in Ministerial office would enjoy it, and learn from it. They were right. I recommend it to anyone who works in the Civil Service, in any policy role, as well as those who want to understand Ministers' lives. It is well-written, and manages to be both serious and funny at the same time.

The Minister who recommended it to me also told me that when they first became a minister, a former Cabinet Minister sent them a copy!


Man Belong Mrs Queen: Adventures with the Philip Worshippers
Man Belong Mrs Queen: Adventures with the Philip Worshippers
Price: 4.19

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mildly interesting, 14 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is mildly interesting but not more than that. We don't get a lot of insight until the last chapter. The earlier chapters are a bit plodding.


Obsessive Compulsive Demon
Obsessive Compulsive Demon
Price: 0.77

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth reading: well written and informative, 14 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a short autobiographical book about the author's coming to terms with OCD, learning to cope with it, and then conquering it. It talks about the role of family and friends, counselling, medication, and CBT.

It is a short book - 48 pages - and that means that anyone can sit down and read it in an hour. It is very well-written, very honest and very straightforward. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in OCD as a condition, but above all to those who have a family member or friend who is suffering from this condition. Bluntly, if the author, whose OCD was severe, can conquer it, so can your friend or relative. This book will give you hope, as well as tips on what to do.

(nb just to be clear, although I am Dr Leunig I am not a medical doctor).


Zyxel 500Mbps Micro Slimline Powerline Adapter (Twin Pack)
Zyxel 500Mbps Micro Slimline Powerline Adapter (Twin Pack)
Offered by 7dayshop Limited (VAT Registered)
Price: 21.45

1.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly easy to set up - but broke after 13 months, 19 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
You plug it in, and press the little button on each adaptor. Then the internet works in another part of your house. It is that simple. The cables are included. It took me less than five minutes from opening the box, to having it all working. I was very pleased indeed.

Sadly 13 months later it stopped working altogether, and I have had to throw it away. It had a 3 year warranty, so they sent me another, but that took 4 weeks, so I had to buy another one in the interim. As you can imagine, I bought a different make!


Cabin Max Black Executive Trolley Flight Approved Hand Luggage- 20" high, 41l case - Black
Cabin Max Black Executive Trolley Flight Approved Hand Luggage- 20" high, 41l case - Black
Offered by Home & Travel
Price: 59.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A wheel fell off within a week, 6 Nov 2012
I treat suitcases carefully. My 1992 Delsey is still going strong, and my 6 Asda carry-on is at least 5 years old, and well used. The wheel fell off this case within a week.

If it had lasted I would have rated it as a reasonable but not exceptional case if priced at around 25. It is a little heavy, and smaller than easyJet allows as hand luggage. The outside compartment is hard to access, and there is no ticket compartment.


Poor Economics: Barefoot Hedge-fund Managers, DIY Doctors and the Surprising Truth about Life on less than $1 a Day
Poor Economics: Barefoot Hedge-fund Managers, DIY Doctors and the Surprising Truth about Life on less than $1 a Day
by Abhijit Banerjee
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

53 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book deserves to be read as well as bought, 9 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an excellent book, that brings their research - and that of others - to the intelligent but not expert reader. (Think: broadsheet newspaper reader)

I am an economist (I teach at LSE), but I am not a development economist. I have no vested interested in the area. I found this a straightforward read - 2 days worth of holiday reading. I think it spot on for the target market - my wife is currently reading it.

The conclusion are broad: poor people are rational, but often ill informed, and that becoming well-informed takes time and effort. As a result, unless everyone understands what the poor think, and why they think it, policies may not work. If poor people don't believe immunisation works, they won't want it whether it is free or not. If poor people think that education is only worthwhile for the brightest, they won't send their kids to school unless they think that they are bright. And if teachers have the same views, their efforts in teaching weaker students will be weak, and universal education will not achieve much. In contrast if schools and parents believe in education, universal education will work much better, for any given level of staffing, funding, etc. We therefore need to understand - and sometimes work to change - beliefs.

The authors are great fans of "random controlled experiments" whereby policy is applied to one group and not to another, and the results compared. This is obviously a good idea, but it would be nice to know a bit more about whether the results are replicable. After all, if beliefs matter, results from one place in India may not travel to another in India, let alone to Africa, etc.

I make two mild criticisms. The books intellectual "straw men" (Jeff Sachs and Bill Easterly) are very American. British academic Paul Collier (Bottom Billion - a great book) gets the odd mention, but Sachs and Easterly are the reference points. I am not sure that they are the best reference points, although they are big names people are likely to have heard of.

Finally, some historical awareness would make this a better book still. For example, the authors argue that human capital, laws, etc are useful when the growth spark arrives - which sounds like a lot of the "why england, why not France?" and "Why Europe, why not China?" economic history literature. Similarly their (surely correct) argument that micro businesses and self employment are what poor people do when they can't get steady employment is matched by studies of the Great Depression (or street vendors in Greece today, for that matter). Such parallels would also make us understand that poor economics has a lot in common with the economics of poor people in history, and the economics of poor people in rich countries.


Athens (Lonely Planet Encounter Guides)
Athens (Lonely Planet Encounter Guides)
by Victoria Kyriakopoulos
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just right for 5 days, 9 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Combine it with tripadvisor and the web for up to date prices/opening hours - which have changed in 5 years - and you can pop this in the back pocket and you are away. We went for five days (2 adults, 1 9 year old) and found this book just what we wanted. Of course some restaurants have closed - there has been a crisis. But Greek people ARE friendly - my daughter was given a strawberry by a market seller, and a small easter egg in a shop (we were just looking in the window!) Athens is great, and pretty empty at the moment. So book your ticket, buy this book, and take off. You won't regret it - it is a must see destination.


Dell 1350cnw  Colour  Printer A4  colour LED, WIFI, 12 ppm colour/15 ppm mono
Dell 1350cnw Colour Printer A4 colour LED, WIFI, 12 ppm colour/15 ppm mono

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very hard to get to work, 19 Dec 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very difficult printer to install. I could not get it to work - and after 2 hours, the Dell technician decided it was faulty. I could not get the replacement to work either - but after 90 minutes of controlling my computer from Bangalore the Dell technician got it to work.

It now does what it says on the tin. It works from all rooms in my house, wirelessly, from both my laptops. I doubt I will be able to get it to work with any other computers, unless the man in Bangalore helps me. So it is not very "future proof" - and for that reason, along with all the hassle of setting it up, I give it 3 stars. (Ideally I would have it so that visitors' computers just find it automatically, and can use it).


Osteoporosis in Men
Osteoporosis in Men
by Eric Orwoll
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 135.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The leading book if you are a man with osteoporosis and you want to understand your condition, 28 Aug 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Osteoporosis in Men (Hardcover)
This book is by the world's leading authors. It is written by doctors, for doctors. I am not a medical doctor (my PhD is in economics) so some of it went over my head. But I got a lot from the bits I did understand, and was able to discuss the treatment options with my doctor more effectively as a result.

It is well organised - the lay reader can pretty much turn to section 10 "Therapy" immediately, and discover the options, the pros and cons, and so on. It won't be the easiest 130 pages you'll ever read, but I found it useful. The final chapter, on future therapies, gives you a sense of what might be around the corner, which is useful if, like me, you are 40.

Other chapters are much more specialised - for example, the chapter covering the connection between organ transplants and osteoporosis is important if you have an organ transplant, but of limited interest to the general reader.

Although I like this book, and am glad to have it on my shelf, I would recommend Orwell / Atlas of osteoporosis as a starting point in preference to this book. It is easier, and shorter.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3