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Julian Gardiner (London)

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Bulk Hardware Chrome Plated Single Robe Hook (Pack of 5)
Bulk Hardware Chrome Plated Single Robe Hook (Pack of 5)
Price: £4.53

2.0 out of 5 stars Hook broke within a month, 24 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you'd asked me a few days ago I would have said these hooks were just fine. Unfortunately the hook I screwed to my bedroom door has just broken in two. It had only had a dressing gown hanging on it! Maybe I was just unlucky.


In the Beginning: A New Interpretation of Genesis
In the Beginning: A New Interpretation of Genesis
by Karen Armstrong
Edition: Paperback

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating insights into the characters of Genesis, 25 May 2007
In this short book Karen Armstrong sheds more light on the meaning and continuing relevance of the book of Genesis than many authors have done in far longer works. In a series of short chapters she discusses the vividly drawn men and women who, with their very human mixtures of strengths and weaknesses, people these remarkable stories. She sees Genesis as the story of God's withdrawal from an intimate involvement in his creation and of the human response to the dilemmas of living in the complex world he has left us. This book makes it abundantly clear why the Hebrew Bible continues to fascinate both believers and non-believers; it will send you back to the book of Genesis with renewed interest.


Pinker's List
Pinker's List
by Elaine Morgan
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A refreshing new look at the evolution of �human nature�, 12 July 2005
This review is from: Pinker's List (Hardcover)
What does evolution tell us about human nature? Most scientists have concluded that, as the product of evolution by natural selection ("the survival of the fittest"), we are bound to be essentially ruthless and selfish creatures; if we appear to be compassionate or generous there must be a "tit for tat" somewhere. In "Pinker's List" Elaine Morgan argues convincingly that the implications of evolution for human nature are not nearly as bleak as has generally been supposed. This is a witty, erudite, and thoroughly enjoyable read, and a very welcome counterblast to those who have tried to use Darwin to prove that "greed is good".


The Seven Deadly Sins: A Contemporary View
The Seven Deadly Sins: A Contemporary View
by Kenneth Slack
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An intelligent and thought-provoking read, 20 May 2005
First published in 1985, this book asks what the contemporary relevance of the thoroughly-medieval sounding "seven deadly sins" still is. In modern times, religious people have tended to steer clear of excessive talk about sin, yet, Slack argues, these "deadly sins" are all still very real for people today. Slack sees these sins as misapplications of proper and natural drives. They are "deadly" in that they are inimical to life, and what it is to be truly alive. A chapter is devoted to each sin: pride, covetousness, lust, envy, gluttony, anger, and sloth. Twenty years on, some of the "up to date" references are now rather dated. But this is an excellent book, still well worth reflecting on.


God in All Things: Earthing Our Spirituality
God in All Things: Earthing Our Spirituality
by Gerard W. Hughes
Edition: Paperback

49 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful and inspiring book, 20 April 2005
This is the sequel to Gerard W. Hughes's classic God of Surprises. Personally, I found this book even more helpful.
Hughes argues passionately that, if God is real, then he is present in all aspects of life. Also, God is a God of compassion, so we cannot seek God without seeking a source of love and compassion towards all people. This is very much a book about breaking down spiritual barriers. Hughes talks a lot about the "split spirituality" that enables us to give only part of our lives to God. Because what Christ demands of us is difficult and revolutionary, we may often choose to keep Him at the edge of our lives. He also writes movingly about the need for understanding between different Christian groups and between different faiths, including also those of no faith.
This is a very moving book. I found it too precious to read through from cover to cover in a few days. Rather, I read it a few pages at a time as an aid to prayer and contemplation. I warmly recommend it as an aid to anyone's spiritual journey.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 28, 2014 6:07 PM BST


A Jealous Ghost
A Jealous Ghost
by A.N. Wilson
Edition: Hardcover

25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling and thought-provoking mystery, 11 April 2005
This review is from: A Jealous Ghost (Hardcover)
Sallie Declan is an American postgraduate living in London and writing her PhD thesis on Henry James's novella The Turn of the Screw. Socially isolated and struggling with her work, she decides to take a job as a nanny. But her life starts to take on an uncanny resemblance to the Henry James story of her studies.
This short novel by A. N. Wilson is a page-turner of a mystery that can be read on a number of levels. It raises some of the same questions about the nature of story telling and the reliability of any narrator as The Turn of the Screw, to which it is a worthy tribute. It is also a convincing and disturbing portrayal of a mind losing touch with reality, as well as (perhaps) a critique of deconstructionist literary theory.
This is a gripping book and, despite its unlikely subject matter, a strangely believable one. Well worth reading.


Warrior Lovers: Erotic Fiction, Evolution and Female Sexuality (Darwinism Today)
Warrior Lovers: Erotic Fiction, Evolution and Female Sexuality (Darwinism Today)
by Catherine Salmon
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating read., 20 Jan 2005
This book offers a remarkably convincing explanation of why some women should want to read and write male/male erotic romances. The book starts with a forceful and provocative statement of the fundamental importance of our evolutionary history to human psychology. The authors then argue how this explains some fairly basic differences in what men and women find erotic, drawing on some interesting comparisons between the behaviour of heterosexuals, gay men, and lesbians. They finally address the question of "slash" fiction and argue that, contrary to what one might think, the appeal of this material is actually rather similar to that of the heterosexual romance novels which are read by many women. I found this book well argued, thought provoking, and enjoyable throughout.


The Monarchy of England, Volume 1: The Beginnings
The Monarchy of England, Volume 1: The Beginnings
by David Starkey
Edition: Hardcover

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling view of Dark Age Britain, 2 Dec 2004
In order to tell the story of the English monarchy, David Starkey starts from the Roman invasion of Britain by Julius Caesar. This first volume ends with the early Norman kings of Britain, William the Conqueror and his sons William Rufus and Henry. Starkey succeeds brilliantly in bringing to life the men and women who shaped this period of history: politicians, plotters, butchers, and saints alike. Offa, Alfred the Great, Edward the Confessor, William the Conqueror and many others, all emerge as individuals with their own personalities, ambitions, and agendas. This is a short book, and provides an excellent introduction to this period of English history. My only regret on finishing it is that the second volume is not yet published.


Consuming Passion: Why Diets Harm Body and Soul
Consuming Passion: Why Diets Harm Body and Soul
by Elizabeth Filleul
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A timely look at why diets don�t work, 1 Sep 2004
Whilst half the world can't get enough to eat, the richer half that can has an increasingly uncomfortable relationship with food. Many people voluntarily starve themselves, while others binge compulsively (some do both). We spend a fortune on diet books and slimming products, yet obesity is at epidemic proportions.
Elizabeth Filleul takes a sane and compassionate look at these issues. She argues that eating disorders are the extreme form of a troubled relationship with food which can affect most of us at one time or another. The message is clear: most diets simply do not work, any weight lost is eventually regained (usually with interest). In order to re-establish healthy eating it is necessary that we understand why we have been abusing food, and get back in touch with our bodies' needs and feelings. Above all we must learn to like ourselves as we are now.
Filleul writes from a Christian perspective, but the book is quite as relevant to those from a different faith background, or none. This is a wonderful book for anyone who has an eating problem, or knows someone who does.


Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
by C S Lewis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.09

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lewis�s last book, and one of his best, 6 Aug 2004
In this slim book, written shortly before his death, C. S. Lewis explores the subject of prayer. Lewis presents the material as a series of letters to an imaginary correspondent called "Malcolm". This device is effective in creating a sense of intimacy; one has the feeling that Lewis is being touchingly frank in his discussion of the difficulties and rewards of the Christian life in general, and prayer in particular. He has interesting and useful things to say about all aspects of prayer: the petitionary prayer, prayers of praise, corporate prayer, and whether it is right to pray for the dead. Lewis's theology has not changed significantly since his much earlier books Mere Christianity and The Screwtape Letters, yet there is something mellower and less confrontational in this writing than in Lewis's more famous Christian books, and it is all the more moving and persuasive for it. The fact that this book was written so near to Lewis's premature death gives it an added poignancy. In conclusion, this is a first rate book which deserves to be more widely known.


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