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Emeka O (London UK)

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The Lion of Umuna: The Legacy of the Nomads (West African Super Heroes Book 1)
The Lion of Umuna: The Legacy of the Nomads (West African Super Heroes Book 1)
Price: £3.30

5.0 out of 5 stars A masterful blend of cross-cultural folklore and mysticism, 28 April 2013
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This could easily have been another routine fictional novel which chronicles the triumph of good over evil. But it went much deeper, blending African (Igbo) folklore with Hebrew mysticism. It also had a rich sprinkling of classical Greek anecdotes. Not sure I have seen African folkore rendered in such contemporary and non-exotic fashion before.

Well worth reading.


Telecom Infrastructure Sharing as a Strategy for Cost Optimization: A Case Study of MTN Nigeria-Zain Nigeria Collocation
Telecom Infrastructure Sharing as a Strategy for Cost Optimization: A Case Study of MTN Nigeria-Zain Nigeria Collocation
by Emeka Onuzuruike
Edition: Paperback
Price: £51.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent insights on telecoms network sharing, 26 Mar. 2013
This book derives from an MBA thesis and so it has an academic feel to it. The author has dutifully explored the concept of network sharing in Nigeria and in the process, x-rayed the opportunities and challenges network sharing can bring to telecoms operators across Africa.

At its heart is a detailed questionnaire which seems to have been completed by 20 highly relevant individuals in the Nigerian telecoms industry. The insights has provided supporting evidence to the author in proving his hypothesis that network sharing is beneficial to operators and the presumed risks are, perhaps, slightly overstated.

Accordingly, this book will be highly beneficial to anyone trying to understand the concepts of network sharing in general, and the African market in particular. It deconstructs what network sharing entails, appraises the opportunities it offers, examines the risks it presents and offers analysis and insights on how regulators and operators can help to realize the benefits of network sharing.

In terms of its content, it deserves a five star. However, its academic format impacts on its readability, hence a four star.


Korda, Michael Power:How to Get it, How to Us
Korda, Michael Power:How to Get it, How to Us
by Michael Korda
Edition: Hardcover

3.0 out of 5 stars Some good points, some rubbish ones, 12 Jan. 2011
I know this book is dated, but still it has some valid points that can at least make you seriously think about how the concept of power is ingrained in all that we do. But the book can also be comical and I can only assume that perhaps that is how the world worked in the 70s.


Making Innovation Work: How to Manage it, Measure it, and Profit from it
Making Innovation Work: How to Manage it, Measure it, and Profit from it
by Tony Davila
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars The single best resource for innovation, 12 Jan. 2011
If you must read one book on innovation, then this is the book for you. The book cuts out much of the chatter on innovation and delivers succinct and concise insights on the topic.


Development as Freedom
Development as Freedom
by Amartya Sen
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.63

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Humanizes economic development, 5 April 2010
This review is from: Development as Freedom (Paperback)
This was a well argued book with really insightful analysis of the concept of development as freedom. Amartya is arguing that developing nations should not embrace a benevolent dictator but should continue expanding rights & freedoms, even if this leads to occasional paralysis.

To understand it, look at the simple puzzle: should developing countries embrace Western concepts of freedom/human rights which has so far failed to lift many of them out of poverty OR should they embrace the Chinese/Asian model of authoritarianism which has succeeded in massively expanding economic development (GDP/GNP)?

By broadening the scope of freedoms, Amartya attempts to show that the Asian model is not a justifiable alternative. He starts by first questioning the use of income levels as a measure of development. For Amartye, development is much more than that, encompassing the totality of the individual's capacity to live his life as he wants.

For him, if the purpose of economic development is to bring social development, then it is wrong to allow the pursuit of the former to hinder the latter. As such, suppressing freedoms (including democratic rights) can never be excused by the claim of chasing economic development.

I have to agree, though, with those who say it is too long to read - hence my four stars.


Economic Philosophy
Economic Philosophy
by Joan Robinson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.65

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good historical overview of economics, 5 April 2010
This review is from: Economic Philosophy (Paperback)
This 1962 classic attempts to articulate the guiding principles behind the subject of economics. Joan starts by trying to reconcile economics with the notion of science and emphasizing the moral and metaphysical dimensions of the subject. She asks the question: Is economics a science or is it an art? If the subject claims to be science, how can its practitioners cling to untested slogans or untestable hypothesis?

To answer the question, Joan generously cites historical economics texts ranging from Adam Smith, Marx, Ricardo, Schumpeter and Keynes. What follows next is an assorted historical discourse on economics as an ideology. She starts off by delving into the classical theories of value, wades through the neo-classical theories of utility and swims into the Keynesian world. That led nicely to her discourse on development and under-development.

This book may have seemed insightful 50 years ago. But in today's post credit crunch world, it is common knowledge that economics is not an exact science. Likewise, under the wave of fiscal policies pushed through to beat the recession, everyone now accepts that governments and economics are twinned.

All the same, the book is a nice summary about economics ideology. Don't bother to read it though if you don't have a grasp of rudimentary economics. It is heavily academic.


Spurs' Cult Heroes: The 20 Greatest Legends in Tottenham's History
Spurs' Cult Heroes: The 20 Greatest Legends in Tottenham's History
by Michael Lacquiere
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.88

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written narrative of Spurs heroes, 5 April 2010
Although I do not support Spurs, this was a book well worth reading. The writing was simple as the author navigated his way through those he regards as the best Tottenham Hotspurs players of all time. Of course everyone will not agree with his choice and he was quite upfront in conceding that fact.

Cult Heroes' list starts off with Sandy Brown (never heard of him before anyway) who played for Spurs between 1900 and 1901, scoring 25 goals in the process. At first, I wondered why such as mediocre history should be included in the list, but then as I read on, it became clear that he masterminded Spurs' first silverware - the FA cup in 1901 in which he scored 15 goals in 8 games against 5 different opponents.

The book continued with the historical slant, dishing out facts, accolades and praises for an array of players who must be evergreen in the minds of any genuine Spurs fan. I particularly enjoyed the stories of Danny Blanchflower who captained the Spurs to a Championship and FA Cup double in 1960/1961. Anyway, much of it became familiar to us younger folks and non-Spurs addicts when the author started describing the antics of players like Glenn Hoddle, Chris Waddle, Paul Gascoigne, Jurgen Klinsmann and David Ginola.

In the end, I was not converted to support Spurs, but the book helped me to develop a greater respect for the team down the road.


The Ten-Day MBA: A Step-By-Step Guide to Mastering the Skills Taught in America's Top Business Schools
The Ten-Day MBA: A Step-By-Step Guide to Mastering the Skills Taught in America's Top Business Schools
by Steven A Silbiger
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written, 25 Nov. 2009
I started an MBA course but wanted to get the nuggets of what I will be studying. The Ten Day MBA gave it to me. The book is beautifully written and is peppered with understandable examples. Am already speaking and writing like an MBA after having just reading two of the modules.


The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good
The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good
by William Easterly
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.89

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Challenges what you believe, 29 May 2009
Easterly does a good job challenging contemporary opinion on how to solve poverty around the book. While the book's title is slightly embarrassing, in a way, it explains the two main themes of the book. Firstly, most of the current attempt to fix the poor world is underpinned by an assumption that the West has a moral burden to help. Secondly, and unfortunately, that attempt fails at the implementation stage because of bureaucracy, arrogance, 'planners vs searchers', and the in situ patronizing and condescending attitude of some Westerners.

Be warned though. It is slightly too long and the statistics can bore you out if all you want is a nice read. Also, by not proffering solutions, Easterly may occasionally appear pessimistic or nonchalant.


The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It
The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It
by Paul Collier
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.35

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Detailed and insightful, 29 May 2009
This book shatters the pervasive and simplistic view that corruption is the ONLY reasons why countries are poor. Using excellent analysis, Paul has presented and demonstrated that the picture is a lot more complicated. His four traps exposes the dangers facing many poor countries. And by bringing in personal examples and relationships with policy makers, he shows that with boldness and the right policies, poor countries can emerge from despair.


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