Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Summer Savings Up to 25% Off Cloud Drive Photos Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Learn more Shop now Learn more
Profile for Juan Korkie > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Juan Korkie
Top Reviewer Ranking: 7,934,609
Helpful Votes: 28

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Juan Korkie (London, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Shamans, Healers and Medicine Men
Shamans, Healers and Medicine Men
by Holger Kalweit
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.56

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inviting a transformation of awareness, 8 Nov. 2007
There are many reasons for reading this book. For a start, it provides a concise and accessible overview of shamanism, its history, the process of initiation, and the role and practice of shamans. The book is also a valuable resource for comparing shamanism as practiced in different cultures, highlighting similarities and differences, with many informative stories and accounts. However, what I find most valuable about this book is the way Kalweit speaks about shamans in terms of energy and awareness, and how these relate to ordinary ways of understanding and making sense of the world. His ideas on how shamans and tribal cultures have been discredited by western language and medicine is particularly valuable. He does not present shamanism as an escape into obscure practices and rituals, but rather as a source of inspiration to transform our awareness, leading to a deeper and more intense appreciation of life.


Shamanic Voices (Arkana)
Shamanic Voices (Arkana)
by Joan Halifax
Edition: Paperback

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A combination of first-person accounts and shamanistic ideas, 26 Oct. 2007
Halifax provides a well-balanced combination of first-person accounts and an overview of key ideas and themes in shamanistic thinking. A wide-range of accounts by shamans give the reader a sense of their way of relating to and making sense of the world, as well as how shamans speak about themselves. Halifax introduces the book and chapters by focusing on the shared underlying themes. This mix of specific personal accounts and general shamanistic ideas makes for fascinating reading.


With Mystics and Magicians in Tibet, etc. With plates, including a portrait (Penguin Books. no. 68.)
With Mystics and Magicians in Tibet, etc. With plates, including a portrait (Penguin Books. no. 68.)
by Alexandra David Neel
Edition: Unknown Binding

5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling weaving of magical ideas, stories and practices, 26 Oct. 2007
This is one of the earliest books I read about magic and mysticism. It inspired me to move onto an exploration of the field with a sense of there being much hidden underneath our daily lives. David-Neel provides an account of her travels and covers a wide range of ideas, rituals and stories. It provides an excellent view of the magical ideas still embedded in its culture of origin. I definitely recommend it.


Mystical Qabalah
Mystical Qabalah
by Dion Fortune
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction to the Qabalah, 16 Oct. 2007
This review is from: Mystical Qabalah (Paperback)
This is one of the first books I read on the qabalah, and one that I have returned to on more than one occasion. The book provides a brief introduction to the qabalah as the "Yoga of the west" and gives an overview of its origin. The remainder focusses on the ten sephiroth of the Tree of Life, and introduces the various associations in terms of the god names, images, numbers, symbols and meanings. It is an excellent starting point for contemplating the tree and understanding how the different sephiroth are connected, yet it is done in way that encourages flexible thinking. Fortune also introduces qliphoth which is very useful. The 32 paths are mentioned, but for a more detailed discussion of these there are other texts available. I recommend this book as an excellent introduction to the Tree of Life.


Kali's Odiyya: A Shaman's True Story of Initiation
Kali's Odiyya: A Shaman's True Story of Initiation
by Amarananda Bhairavan
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An elegant integration of Kali and shamanism, 16 Oct. 2007
A very moving book that brings the different aspects of Kali and shamanism together. The book covers a number of years in the lives of two childen growing up in a rural indian village where Kali workship is integral to daily living. Accounts of their experiences and the discussions with Aunt Preema gives an insight into both the everyday and more hidden sides of Kali worship, the latter linking with the odiyyas (shamans). By means of conversation ideas about Kali, karma and reincarnation are explained in a way that does not require previous knowledge of the topic. The shamanistic ideas relating to awareness, energy and freedom resonate with the ideas found in the books of Carlos Castaneda. Overall the book is a very elegant integration and presentation of otherwise complex ideas that are conveyed in the context of a series of very human experiences. I definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in either Kali or shamanism, or both.


Evil Selected lectures
Evil Selected lectures
by Rudolf Steiner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.95

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A perspective that makes sense, 15 Oct. 2007
This review is from: Evil Selected lectures (Paperback)
I have just read this collection of Steiner's lectures for the second time, having been drawn back by the ideas that keep coming up in my day-to-day thinking. As with most of Steiner's work, whether the books or lectures, they are never "easy reads". However, he conveys his ideas in a way that makes sense, even if you do not consider yourself an anthoposophist. Steiner presents evil in a way that one can relate to in the course of everyday life, and though a familiarity with his style and ideas helps, his examples explain the fairly complex and unusual ideas very well.

He speaks about evil in terms of qualities being out of place - qualities that belong in the spiritual world that are applied to physical realm. He explains why certain qualities, for example the ego, need to be strong to be in the spiritual realm, but does not belong in the physical world. He also talks about evil in terms of qualities that are in excess, which again makes sense and is an idea that anyone can relate to. His description of the difference between Luciferic and Ahrimanic forces takes some getting used to, but if one moves beyond the usual associations of the "lucifer", it makes perfect sense.

I will definitely recommend this book to anyone that is interested in a less dogmatic and more thoughtful consideration of evil.


Practical Guide to Qabalistic Symbolism
Practical Guide to Qabalistic Symbolism
by Gareth Knight
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A "must have" for those with more than a passing interest, 1 Oct. 2007
Of the books I have read on the subject this is the one I keep going back to. The book strikes a perfect balance by being neither a casual and superficial read nor dense and obscure. It makes an excellent reference text and is based on the glyph of the Tree of Life. It provides a wealth of associated images, symbols, meanings, myths, etc that assists one in getting a sense of the nature of the paths/spheres. I definately recommend it to anyone who has done some basic reading on the Qabala and wants to make a more detailed study of it.


Page: 1