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Reviews Written by
Mr. M. Dodds "CL_Review" (Banbridge, NI, UK)
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Headhunters
Headhunters
by Jo Nesbo
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Frustrating, Jo Nesbo is better than this, 31 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Headhunters (Paperback)
I start this by saying that I am a massive Jo Nesbo fan. I have read, enjoyed and loved each of the Harry Hole series and believe that they are well thought out, believable and real.

This is why it pains me to say that I did not enjoy this book anywhere near as much as anticipated. I wasn't expecting Harry Hole but then again I did hope to get that familiar Jo Nesbo story telling experience, and sadly I was left empty by the construct of the story.

I don't want to get into plot spoilers so I will try to keep my comments in line with what has been said before and also the description on the back of the book. A promising start is made, the character is presented and within the first few chapters we get to understand Roger Brown, what makes him tick and what makes him behave in the manner he does. He loves his wife, he doesn't feel good enough to have her and therefore he steals art to provide a life, that he believes she should have.

We are then introduced to Clas Greve the owner of an extremely rare painting and Roger sees his big pay day. Unfortunately this is where the story quickly begins to unravel. We know something goes wrong, we know that Roger's life is going to be turned upside down by this man. I can see it coming, I know what way this is going to go but instead NO!! it turns into Die Hard or even worse Die Hard 4.0.

I cannot begin to express how much this disappointed me. Ultimately Nesbo gets round to explaining why the characters behave in the manner they do. They are a reflection of each other and only by coming face to face with each other do they only realise what lurks deep within them both. I understand that, I get that but why o why did we have to get car chases, guns, dead bodies and a complete insane dutch man to get us there?!

The Harry Hole books are well written, smart, slick and intellectually stimulating. Why Nesbo left this avenue to embark on a convoluted and Michael Bay style approach in this novel beats me. I feel like I am knifing a dear friend by writing this but it needs to be said.


Sir Vivian: The Definitive Autobiography
Sir Vivian: The Definitive Autobiography
by Viv Richards
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Chopped up, lacking in detail, 6 Mar. 2008
I was thinking that an autobiography on the life and times of Sir Viv Richards would be a fast paced affair detailing his triumphs as a test cricketer reliving all his great moments. However I was disapointed to find that the book did not even stick to a chronological order meaning that it became difficult to even assess the growing stature of the great mans career. Even at this the detail on the matches themselves are light in detail and I afraid to say very rarely took me to that place in his cricketing life. The book ends with a manifesto from Sir Viv on how he would change West Indies Cricket for the better. While it is clear that Viv is a very passionate and devoted person both to Cricket and his country, Antigua, I also got the sense that it was all slightly unnecessary. While an interesting read for anyone with a genuine love and interest in Cricket I would doubt it's appeal outside this bracket


The Last Revolution: 1688 and the Creation of the Modern World
The Last Revolution: 1688 and the Creation of the Modern World
by Patrick Dillon
Edition: Paperback

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good overview of the changes that shaped much of our modern world., 6 Mar. 2008
Patrick Dillon writes a superb, detailed account of the turmoil that surrounded this period in history. While the glorious revolution of 1688 is explored in detail with the personalities of Kings William and James shining through, it also catalogues other changes to Britain that were ushered in at the same time and introduces us to many of those characters including Sir Isaac Newton. However while this is a superb book I could not help but feel slightly lost in all the detail, as well as this we are constantly brought back to the North family. While they are obviously there to illustrate how modern England was changing I could not help but see them as slightly irrelevant to the story Dillon was trying to portray. However with these minor points aside this is a very interesting and informative book on a contentious period of history with great references for further study.


Nine-Day Queen of England: Lady Jane Grey
Nine-Day Queen of England: Lady Jane Grey
by Faith Cook
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good read for those interested in the Tudor power struggle, 18 Jun. 2007
A very good look into the life of lady Jane Grey. Cook expertly eplores the relationships within the royal family while highlighting the religious piety of both Lady Jane and King Edward. A great encouragement for all christians and an interesting insight into the lives of those who were willing to stand for biblical truths in England at the time.


Adenauer
Adenauer
by Charles Williams
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow burner that accelerates to it's conclusion, 13 Jun. 2007
This review is from: Adenauer (Hardcover)
Charles William's gives a descriptive and introspective look into the life of West Germany's first chancellor. I found this book slow to get into at first, however as the books moves to the defining years of Adenauer's life it shows how huge a part this man had in shaping the new West Germany. For those interested in German history and it's development after WW2 this is a very good read.


Monarchy: From the Middle Ages to Modernity
Monarchy: From the Middle Ages to Modernity
by David Starkey
Edition: Hardcover

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Gripping Tale of The Transfer of Power through the Ages, 26 Jan. 2007
David Starkey provides a gripping tale of the various claims to the English and later British throne that there has been throughout the century. What Starkey achieves so well in this book that he does not merely catalogue every King and Queen from King Henry VII to Queen Victoria but rather how the power of the monarchy passed to each Dynasty in turn. A great read and one which is highly recommended for anyone reading about the English monarchy for the first time.


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