Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for Mr. Den Browne > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Mr. Den Browne
Top Reviewer Ranking: 20,768
Helpful Votes: 385

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Mr. Den Browne "Bigga D" (SW London, UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
pixel
Car Mount, Idealeben Grip Magic Mobile Phone Air Vent Magnetic Universal Car Mount Holder Cradle for iPhone and Andriod Cellphone
Car Mount, Idealeben Grip Magic Mobile Phone Air Vent Magnetic Universal Car Mount Holder Cradle for iPhone and Andriod Cellphone
Offered by DerekGruppe
Price: £7.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Good mount, 7 April 2016
I was supplied this item at discount price in return for a fair review. This looks like it would work well as a hands free accessory & means you don't have to deal with ugly suction pads. Comes with magnetic plates for fixing.


Salt and Pepper Grinder, Idealeben [2-in-1] Dual Manual Salt or Pepper Mill, Stainless Steel Elegantly Designed with Adjustable Ceramic Grinding Mechanism
Salt and Pepper Grinder, Idealeben [2-in-1] Dual Manual Salt or Pepper Mill, Stainless Steel Elegantly Designed with Adjustable Ceramic Grinding Mechanism
Offered by DerekGruppe
Price: £15.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Cool 2-in-1 Grinder, 7 April 2016
This is a really nice little gadget, works really well & nice, clean design too. Standing at just under 9" (22cms approx) in height, you simply turn it the right way up to grind salt or pepper as required. The detachable covers at each end ensure that the contents don't get damp between uses. I was invited to review this product,but I'm glad to say it's something I'd recommend regardless


[Hand Coffee Grinder] Idealeben Manual Coffee Mill-- Great Coffee Bean Grinder with Stainless Steel Design, Adjustable Fineness with Precision Ceramic, Perfect for Home or Portable for Camping
[Hand Coffee Grinder] Idealeben Manual Coffee Mill-- Great Coffee Bean Grinder with Stainless Steel Design, Adjustable Fineness with Precision Ceramic, Perfect for Home or Portable for Camping
Offered by DerekGruppe
Price: £18.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Great Grinder!, 6 April 2016
This grinder is a really good addition to our kitchen gadgets. We really like our coffee & this has some very nice features. It's adjustable so you can choose how fine or coarse you want to grind your beans. Its also a smart modern design, with a streamlined look to it. Cleaning is straightforward. The device is very easy to use, and comes with some easy to understand instructions as well.
I was invited to review this product by the manufacturer & got it at a discount - but the opinions here are totally my own.


Idealeben 3X 10X 60X Mini Handheld Reading Magnifier Small Portable Illuminated Magnifying Glass Jewelers Loupe with UV Black Light for Coin and Stamp Appraisal Counterfeit Detection (3 Button Batteries, Black)
Idealeben 3X 10X 60X Mini Handheld Reading Magnifier Small Portable Illuminated Magnifying Glass Jewelers Loupe with UV Black Light for Coin and Stamp Appraisal Counterfeit Detection (3 Button Batteries, Black)
Offered by DerekGruppe
Price: £12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Versatile Light, 21 Mar. 2016
Unreadable small print is one of my pet hates so I'm loving this new reading magnifier. This is a really nice piece of design - the reading magnifier is a highly compact but very easy to use piece of kit. So small it'll fit easily into any bag or pocket & just right for when you need to examine something closely. Ideal for personal or office use. It has a variety of different lights for the various functions it can perform & comes in a neat little carrying case. As a bit of a night bird I can see I'll be using this mainly for reading in bed, but it is capable of operating at a much higher level - it'd be fine for anyone who works with things like jewellery, stamps or coins. Good price too.


Garlic Press, Idealeben Stainless Steel Garlic, Ginger, Walnut Press, and Crusher professional Kitchenware (Silver)
Garlic Press, Idealeben Stainless Steel Garlic, Ginger, Walnut Press, and Crusher professional Kitchenware (Silver)
Offered by Highmont
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Ultimate Garlic Press, 21 Mar. 2016
A garlic press is an essential piece of kit in the modern kitchen. Over the years I've worked my through quite a few but often found them fiddly to use or difficult to keep clean, so back to using a knife & then having my hands reek of garlic all day. No such problems with the Idealaben Pampered Chef Advanced Garlic Press. It's a seriously impressive bit of design & manufacture - nice clean action to the press & good solid handles to grip. In addition its very easy to clean - either by hand or in the washing-up machine. Our old one has gone a nasty dull grey colour but that won't happen with this stainless steel model. As well as making short work of all the garlic here, this device can also crack nuts -very handy for anyone pursuing a healthy diet - and other things like ginger root that you don't want to be getting too hands-on with.

I have seen the future with this very impressive device! Highly recommended


Jumpin' Jack Flash: David Litvinoff and the Rock'n'Roll Underworld
Jumpin' Jack Flash: David Litvinoff and the Rock'n'Roll Underworld
by Keiron Pim
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.88

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Only Performance That Matters, 29 Feb. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a fascinating account of an unusual life, set against a restless background of changing times and places as the story moves from the post-war East End, through the long snooze of the 1950’s, and onward to the creative whirlpool of London in what’s now known as the “Swinging Sixties”, before reaching an appropriate end in the come-down years of the following decade. David Litvinoff was a strange character who shape-shifted between different scenes and personal reinventions, mixing with everyone from the Kray twins to the cream of the British art and music scenes, while blagging his way to jobs like society gossip columnist on the Daily Express. Clearly a very intelligent and creative man, with an obsessive love of music (especially Bob Dylan & the Blues) inspiring many a friendship, Litvinoff nevertheless presents a real challenge to any biographer, especially as this is Keiron Pim’s first book. He wanted to move through life without leaving any trace, destroying everything he could of his work and writings before his suicide in 1975. Although the author has managed to find a few letters and other surviving scraps, the gaps in the story or conflicting views presented by different friends suggest that he largely succeeded in erasing or blurring the traces of his past. For all his intelligence, he comes across as an intimidating and rather detached figure, intriguing, but hard to like or trust (I’d imagine), and capable of real cruelty to friends and foes alike.

When the book opens with the lead character trussed up and suspended upside down over Kensington High Street, it’s clear that it isn’t going to be a straightforward tale. Typically, Litvinoff was able to spin and mystify the story to his advantage over the years, reinforced by the equally enigmatic facial razor scarring he’d acquired around the same time.

The “Jumping Jack Flash … Rock’n’roll Underworld” title is a bit misleading, and underplays the breadth of subjects in the book– sure, Jagger and Richards are important figures in the story, along with Eric Clapton & Marianne Faithfull, and the rest of the groovy Kings Road/Pheasantry crowd, but there’s no star-struck celebrity name-dropping to be found here. His significance really comes in his involvement with the making of “Performance”, whether as ‘specialist dialogue consultant’ or the major script-writing role he himself claimed to have filled. In this way, the book makes an interesting companion to the “Performance: a biography” book published a couple of years ago. A lot of the film’s story concerns the effects of a collision between hard core, old school criminality from the wrong side of town, and what happens when it collides with moneyed decadence and the new rock aristocracy across town. Apart from using his knowledge of people like the Krays in the creation of characters like the genuinely sinister and scary gang leader Harry Flowers (based on Ronnie Kray, allegedly), his East End knowledge and connections provided the link the film’s makers needed to take “Performance” to a different level than any previous British crime movie. Thus the film includes real life crims like John Bindon in the cast, while actor James Fox was given all the introductions he needed to fully understand the “Thug Life” of his character and journey safely into the criminal demi-monde and come back intact. It’s this kind of insight and detail (down to hair and clothes) that gives so much of the film a really uncomfortable authenticity (such as the beating and torture of the chauffeur) along with the psychedelic weirdness of much of the story.

One of the first things that draws the viewer into the film is the decadent atmosphere and visual impact of Turner’s Powis Square mansion, with its extraordinary furnishings of faded hippy chic, Moroccan souk and crumbling Kings Road excess. Litvinoff’s work is clearly visible again here, bringing in his friend Christopher Gibbs – who’d furnished Brian Jones’ Earls Court pleasure dome in similar style – to create the create the weird and claustrophobic atmosphere of the time-locked house.

After “Performance” Litvinoff seemed to go into something of a depression, whether because the film hadn’t brought him the kind of wealth and respect he’d hoped for, or as a more general realisation (common at the time) that the party was over, opportunities had been and gone, while tougher times lay ahead. It’s no fault of the book’s that the last couple of chapters flag a little in recounting his hanging out in Wales in the fading light of his psychedelic aristo connections, followed by a lengthy trip to Australia, as always involved in various alternative art and lifestyle scenes, but ultimately brought back to the UK after yet another romantic disappointment.

One of the other reviews here queries whether David Litvinoff is really worthy of a full length book, suggesting that ultimately he’s more of a Zelig-like foot-note to the deeds and lives of more interesting and productive characters. The same point was made more succinctly to the author by an Australian cabbie, “Sounds like you’re wasting your time mate. I’ve never heard of him.” It’s a fair point, but I think the author succeeds in showing why he’s worth writing about at such length. His story shows how the sixties scene didn’t emerge fully formed, but had evolved gradually in the emerging post-war years, and how seemingly disparate elements eventually realised they had causes in common. Litvinoff had an instinctive understanding of the subtle interplays and opportunities as the old rules and class structures were questioned and left behind in the quest for fun, freedom and creativity.

For all his coldness and mutability, David Litvinoff was clearly able to inspire affection and loyalty among his friends. Some of the first reactions to this book show the effect carries on to this day, and how differently he presented himself according to company and setting. There’s no doubt either that he delighted in his own myth-making and muddying. The Kensington story and an ear-to-ear razor slashing were favourite topics for reinvention – was it because he’d generally shown a lack of respect for Ronnie Kray? Or particularly because he’d called him Bootface behind his back? Or was it part of a falling out over a mutual boyfriend?

I’d recommend this book to anyone with a real interest in the extraordinary “Performance” film (I’ll own up – it’s my favourite) or who prefers to look beyond the surface of different scenes and penetrate the details. There’s a dumbed down, convenient Sixties shorthand now where it’s all naÔve mindless optimism, peace and love, Beatles and Stones, bell bottoms and paisley, brown rice for breakfast and so on. This view ignores the many political, artistic and social conflicts of the era and the genuinely confrontational, collision of generations feeling then– so it’s worth reading something like this and see that Litvinoff had an innate understanding of how it felt and what it meant to be an outsider, not only from his East End Jewish roots, and his sexuality at a time when it was a crime to be gay. There’s a fantastic cast of characters –the career criminals, major artists like Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon, the emerging 60’s psychedelic artists like Martin Sharp and Nigel Waymouth. Combined with the author’s instinct for the telling detail and ability to catch the atmosphere of places as diverse as East End spielers, West End clubs or the Australian outback it gives the story a real depth.

Equally, the book isn’t perfect either. There are some fairly general digressions about art movements, for example, that could be edited a bit. The author has succeeded in tracking down a few letters to friends and a transcript made by Litvinoff of conversations with his friend John Ivor Golding that managed to escape being destroyed and sees them as crucial to understanding the man. Whatever, it was great research (as throughout the book) to find this material, but “imho” the letters read like fairly typical stoned/drunk writing – good in parts, but nowhere near as funny or perceptive as it seems to the writer at the time. As for the transcripts, I was never really able to buy into Litvinoff’s fascination with the John Ivor Golding character, while overall the piece seemed to be aiming for an arch Joe Orton/Oscar Wilde type voice, but not quite succeeding.

There s, though, an extraordinary quote, which for me really captures the essence of the man and his hyper-intelligent alienation, and in a strange way captures much of the book’s atmosphere and appeal -

“If you want advice go to a friend, if you want help go to a stranger, if you want nothing at all go to your relations”

Although the line is spoken by Golding - who attributes it to Confucius - it sums up so much of the character and story of David Litvinoff as revealed in this book. The cry for help and contact – beneath the sophistry – is unmistakable.


Premier Housewares Retro Ball Table Clock, Orange
Premier Housewares Retro Ball Table Clock, Orange
Price: £7.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Quite Good Clock But..., 21 Oct. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
There's plenty to like about this clock - nice bright design, tells time well, and doesn't take up too much space on the desk. Fine if you never move it, but there's a real design flaw - the two halves (white top part & orange base) come apart at the slightest touch & it's really fiddly & frustrating trying to get them to fit together again. They aren't made to screw together - just overlap - which doesn't help.


Chelsea FC: Complete Results Archive: Premier League
Chelsea FC: Complete Results Archive: Premier League
Price: £2.10

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars "Complete"?!? You're having a laugh, 9 April 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
For something that's advertised as "Chelsea FC - Complete Results Archive: Premier League" this is seriously lacking in information. If it had cost any more than a couple of quid I'd be wanting my money back. Basically all you get is page after page as follows-

"Blackburn
Rovers
1-2"

followed by date/location/result w/d/l, "additional info", ref's name & attendance figure.

So no team line ups, scorers - or facility to enter them yourself. I can't see how someone can honestly sell this as "complete" when there's so little information.

Don't waste your money on this useless product


Tiger Woods PGA TOUR 12: The Masters (PC / MAC)
Tiger Woods PGA TOUR 12: The Masters (PC / MAC)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars EA = Extremely Annoying, 19 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
EA built the TW games franchise on the PC versions but now it seems they don't want to be bothered with their older fans. I play games occasionally & don't want to have to buy dedicated gaming equipment like Xbox etc. So it was great to get hold of this & hope we hadn't been forgotten completely. Then I found that in their wisdom EA have withdrawn all online support, in-game upgrades, pro shop - the lot. So what you're left with is a very basic & very clunky game where your poor old golfer is doomed to be on the Road to Nowhere rather than the Masters. Strangely the driving is absurdly easy - almost anything you hit finds it way miraculously to the middle of the fairway. But as other reviewers have noted, the putting is a total lottery & practically impossible. It's a shame, because the courses look great.

I've emailed EA several times asking about these problems but never got any replies.


Moon [DVD] [2009]
Moon [DVD] [2009]
Dvd ~ Sam Rockwell
Offered by Discs4all
Price: £3.18

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The moon who fell to earth, 16 Oct. 2014
This review is from: Moon [DVD] [2009] (DVD)
I read some very positive things about this film, and was looking forward to seeing it. As a long term Bowie fan, there was the`added appeal of it being directed by his son Duncan Jones. I must own up to not having watched it right to the end as I'd twigged the punch line in the story long before (don' t worry, no spoilers here).

The main character is in charge of a mining unit on the dark side of the moon. All he has for company is a kind of updated Hal super computer/robot from "2001" called Gerty. Gerty is voiced - very well - by Kevin Spacey, but by the time I gave up I was wondering if that's where most of the budget went. Lots of slow scenes on near empty sets. When he ventures outside things get really laughable - the base and moon ranger look like they were knocked up on "Blue Peter".

From the other reviews here I can see I'm in the minority - I had high hopes for this but the script's nowhere near as clever as it thinks it is, I couldn't raise much interest in the main character, and otherwise it just came across as a cut-price mix of undeveloped ideas from "2001" and "The Man Who Fell to Earth", in the end it just felt dull and empty - like space in fact...
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 23, 2014 1:23 PM BST


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7